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Full text of "The Biographical record of Kane County, Illinois"

II B R.AR.Y 

OF THL 
UNIVERSITY 

or ILLINOIS 



977.323 
B52 



111. Hist. Surv. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



OF 



KANE COUNTY, 



ILLINOIS. 



people t/int lake no pride in the noble achievements of remote ancestors -juiJI never achieve 
anything worthy to be remembered with pride bv remote generations." MACAULEY. 



CHICAGO : 
THE S. J. CI-ARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

1898. 



" Biography is the only true history." 

EMERSON. 



(T 



PRKFACE. 




HE greatest of English historians, MACAULAY, and one of the most 
brilliant writers of the present century, has said: "The history of a 
country is best told in a record of the lives of its people." In con- 
formity with this idea, the BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD has been prepared. 
Instead of going to musty records, and taking therefrom dry statistical 
matter that can be appreciated but by few, our corps of writers have 
gone to the people, the men and women who have, by their enterprise 
and industry, brought these counties to a rank second to none among 
those comprising this great and noble State, and from their lips have the story of their life 
struggles. No more interesting or instructive matter could be presented to an intelligent 
public. In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation 
of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and 
economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing 
an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout 
the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of 
life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in 
every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually 
crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the 
world, have pursued the " even tenor of their way," content to have it said of them, as Christ, 
said of the woman performing a deed of mercy "They have done what they could." It 
tells how many, in the pride and strength of young manhood, left the plow and the anvil, the 
lawyer's office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country's 
call went forth valiantly " to do or die," and how through their efforts the Union was 
restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every 
woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. 

Coming generations will appreciate this volume and preserve it as a sacred treasure, from 
the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which 
would otherwise be inaccessible. Great care has been taken in the compilation of the work, 
and every opportunity possible given to those represented to insure correctness in what has 
been written ; and the publishers flatter themselves that they give to their readers a work with 
few errors of consequence. In addition to biographical sketches, portraits of a number of 
representative citizens are given. 

The faces of some, and biographical sketches of many, will be missed in this volume. 
For this the publishers are not to blame. Not having a proper conception of the work, some 
refused to give the information necessary to compile a sketch, while others were indifferent. 
Occasionally some member of the family would oppose the enterprise, and on account of such 
opposition the support of the interested one would be withheld. In a few instances men 
never could be found, though repeated calls were made at their residence or place of business. 



July, 1898. 



THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING Co. 




HON. CHARLES WHEATON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



HON. CHARLES WHEATON, a lead- 
ing member of the bar of Aurora, Illi- 
nois, was born in Warren, Rhode Island, 
May 29, 1829, and is the son of Nathan M. 
and Content B. (Maxwell) Wheaton, the 
former being the son of Charles Wheaton, 
who was born in Rehoboth, Massachusetts, 
and was the son of Nathaniel, who was a 
native of the same place. Nathaniel was 
the son of Daniel, who was also born in Re- 
hoboth, while Daniel was the son of Eph- 
raim, who was the son of Robert, who was 
born in England in 1606, and came to Amer- 
ica in 1636, landing at Salem. He was the 
founder of the family in this country. From 
Salem, he removed to Rehoboth, where his 
death occurred. He was a minister of the 
Baptist church. 

Nathan M. Wheaton was born in War- 
ren, Rhode Island, in 1785. He was a 
merchant and trader, in his own ships, to 
the West Indies, Cuba and other islands. 
His death occurred July 3, 1861. He was 
a member of the Episcopal church, and in 
politics was a Whig. Content Maxwell, his 
wife, was a daughter of James and Content 
(BraytonJ Maxwell, who were members of 
the society of Friends, or Quakers. Not- 
withstanding his religion, James Maxwell 
served in the war of the Revolution, going 
into the service from Rhode Island. He 
was of Scotch ancestry. The Braytons were 
also Quakers. Content Maxwell was born 



in Warren, Rhode Island, December 26, 
1795, and died in November, 1837. To 
Nathan M. Wheaton and wife were born 
nine children Elbridge Gerry, Mary, 
Emma, Laura, Rebecca, Susan, Charles, 
Elizabeth, and one who died in infancy. 
Emma married William Baker; Laura mar- 
ried George L. Cooke; Susan married S. V. 
R. Hickox; and Elizabeth married Daniel 
L. Turner. All are now deceased save our 
subject and Elizabeth. 

The early life of Charles Wheaton was 
spent at Warren, Rhode Island, and until 
sixteen years of age he attended the Epis- 
copal school at Warren. He then came 
west, and entered the college, at Robin's 
Nest, known as Bishop Chase's Jubilee Col- 
lege, in Peoria county, Illinois, where he re- 
mained one year. To assist Bishop Chase, 
his father had bought two scholarships, one 
of which he used for his son. Upon leav- 
ing that college, he entered Trinity College 
at Hartford, Connecticut, from which he 
was graduated in June, 1849. 

After his graduation, Mr. Wheaton en- 
tered the law office of Hon. Benjamin F. 
Thomas, at Worcester, Massachusetts, where 
he spent two years, and was admitted to 
the bar, in September, 1851. He there be- 
gan practice, which he continued for three 
years, and in October, 1854, again came 
west, locating at Batavia, in January, 1855, 
then one of the most promising towns in 



10 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the Fox River Valley, where he opened his 
office. He practiced there until 1859, when 
he removed to Aurora, opened an office, and 
has here continued in active practice. His 
first partner was S. W. Burns and then A. 
G. McDole, the firm name being Wheaton 
& McDole. In 1873, he opened an office 
in Chicago, which was run under the firm 
name of Wheaton, Canfield & Smith. This 
partnership continued until 1875, when it 
was dissolved, since which time he has been 
alone. Since 1875, his time has almost en- 
tirely been devoted to the trial of cases, and 
there has been but few cases of importance, 
in this or adjoining counties, that he has 
not been on one side or the other. 

. Mr. Wheaton was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah H. Brewster, July 17, 1860, at 
Middlebury, Vermont, of which place she is 
a native, born October i, 1830. She is the 
daughter of Elisha and Rebecca (Fish) 
Brewster. Elisha Brewster was born at 
Norwich, Connecticut, in 1790, and was the 
son of Seabury Brewster, who was the son 
of Wrestling, who was a native of Norwich. 
His father, also named Wrestling, was like- 
wise a native of Norwich, and whose father, 
also named Wrestling, was a native of Dux- 
bury, Massachusetts. His father was Love 
Brewster, who was born in England, and 
who was the son of Elder William Brewster, 
who came over in the Mayflower in 1620. 
Elisha Brewster married Rebecca Fish, at 
Hartford, Connecticut, September 28, 1812. 
She was born September 28, 1789. Her 
father was Miller Fish, born in Bazrott, 
Connecticut, in 1764, and married Huldah 
Corning, who was born in Hartford, No- 
vember 4, 1765. Their children were: Hen- 
ry, Rebecca, John, Mary, Frederick, Ed- 
ward J., George H., Huldah C., John M., 
Julia C. and Arthur M. 



Mr. and Mrs. Wheaton are the parents 
of five children, as follows: Lizzie T., who 
married Charles H. Hale, of Aurora, by 
whom she has two children, Bessie W. and 
Helen L. ; Clara S., at home; Sarah, the 
wife of Bert A. Allen, living in Aurora, and 
they have one child, Charles W. ; Anna H., 
at home; and Mary F., who married Harry 
H. Holden, of Aurora, and they have one 
child, Sarah M. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wheaton are members of 
the Congregational church, and in politics 
he is a Republican. In 1864 he was elected 
mayor of the city, but resigned before the 
expiration of his term. For four years he 
served as a member of the board of super- 
visors, and in 1870 was a member of the 
constitutional convention, in which body he 
was an active factor. He resides in a beauti- 
ful home, at 297 La Salle street, which he had 
erected for himself, and around him are all 
his family, to whom he has given a home, and 
in whose society he finds much enjoyment. 

In his long professional career, Mr. 
Wheaton has much to be proud of. He has 
been eminently successful in the trial of 
cases, rarely losing a cause he espoused, and 
his arduous labors have brought him a lib- 
eral competency. His professional career 
has been free from trickery and question- 
able practices, so often resorted to by mem- 
bers of the bar. His strength has been in a 
good education, a sound knowledge of law, 
a careful study of cases placed in his charge, 
the completeness of his briefs, his skillful 
management, and his able, logical and elo- 
quent pleading, having always the respect 
of the court and the confidence of the jury. 
His private life has been as pure as his pro- 
fessional one, and he holds the esteem and 
confidence of the community in which he 
has so long dwelt. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ii 



SAMUEL W. CHAPMAN, ex-postmaster 
of Elgin and senior member of the firm 
of S. W. & A. M. Chapman, dealers in car- 
riages, wagons and agricultural implements, 
26 River street, Elgin, is a truly representa- 
tive citizen of Kane county, where almost 
his entire life has been spent. He was born 
in Wyoming, New York, September 9, 1843, 
and is the son of Samuel and Margaret 
(Spittal) Chapman, both of whom were na- 
tives of Glasgow, Scotland. Their family 
comprised nine children, four sons and five 
daughters, eight of whom are now living 
Samuel W. , of this sketch; Helen M., wife 
of Frank P. Smith, of Kinsley, Kansas; 
Mary E., wife of John Collins, of Harter, 
Kansas; Sarah J., wife of Edson B. Easton, 
of Guthrie, Oklahoma; Albert A., of Texas; 
John E. , of Texas; Grace A., wife of Royal 
W. Kimball, of Elgin; Julia A., wife of 
George M. Peck, of Elgin; and Fred L. , 
publisher of " The Ram's Horn," Chicago. 
Samuel Chapman, the father, by occu- 
pation was a farmer, and came to America 
in 1841, locating in Wyoming, New York. 
In 1844, he came to Kane county, Illinois, 
and settled in Plato township, where he en- 
gaged in farming until his death. He first 
purchased forty acres of wild land, and as 
his means increased added to his posses- 
sions until he was the owner of four hundred 
and sixty acres. Thoroughly loyal to his 
adopted country, when the South rebelled 
against the general government he assisted 
in raising a company of cavalry known as 
the Plato Cavalry, of which he was commis- 
sioned first lieutenant. He and John S. 
Durand furnished the horses for the com- 
pany, which they afterwards sold to the 
government. After the battle of Pea Ridge 
he resigned and came home. Politically he 
was a democrat, and while not caring for 



office, served his township as supervisor for 
some years. His death occurred in Octo- 
ber, 1886, at the age of seventy years. His 
good wife survived him more than a year, 
dying at the age of sixty-nine years. They 
were members of the Congregational church 
and died in the full assurance of faith in the 
life beyond the grave. Both were well 
known and universally esteemed. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
also named Samuel Chapman, was likewise 
a native of Scotland, and there died when 
about seventy-five years of age. His occu- 
pation was that of a farmer. The maternal 
grandfather, Andrew Spittal, was born in 
Scotland and died near Glasgow when about 
eighty years of- age. He followed farming 
as a means of livelihood. 

Samuel W. Chapman, our subject, was 
about one year old when brought by his par- 
ents to Kane county, and upon the old farm 
in Plato township his boyhood and youth 
were passed. The eldest in the family, he 
was early 'trained to labor upon the farm 
and knows from experience the meaning of 
hard work. His primary education was ob- 
tained in the subscription and district 
schools, and his collegiate training at Beloit 
College. 

Soon after leaving college Mr. Chapman 
went to Burlington, Iowa, as cashier in the 
American and United States Express office, 
where he remained four years, discharging 
his duties in a faithful and conscientious 
manner. He then returned to Elgin and 
ran a flouring-mill. for ten years, when he 
secured the position as agent of the McCor- 
mick Harvesting Machine Company, remain- 
ing with that company for fifteen years, re- 
signing in 1893, when he embarked in his 
present wagon, carriage and implement 
business. In 1896 he associated with him- 



12 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



self A. M. Chapman, who, while of the 
same name, is no relation, and the business 
has since been conducted under the firm 
name of S. W. & A. M. Chapman. Not- 
withstanding the hard times since the busi- 
ness was begun, a good trade has been 
established, which is constantly increasing. 

On the 1 5th of December, 1867, Mr. 
Chapman was united in marriage with Miss 
Alvena F. Stone, a native of Elgin town- 
ship, and a daughter of Isaac and Abigail 
Stone, natives of New Hampshire, and who 
came to Kane county in 1831. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chapman now reside in a pleasant 
home, No. 753 Highland avenue, where 
they delight to entertain their many friends. 
Mrs. Chapman has for many years been a 
member of the Congregational church, and 
is well known in religious circles. Frater- 
nally, Mr. Chapman is a Master Mason. 

Like his father before him, Mr. Chap- 
man is a thorough Democrat, and in the 
success of the party takes especial delight. 
His face is a familiar one in the conventions 
of the party, and his influence is felt in its 
councils. He has never cared for official 
position, as his tastes and inclinations ran 
in an entirely different channel. For seven 
years, however, he served as a member 
of the board of education, because of the 
fact that he is a firm believer in the public 
schools and desired to render all the aid in 
his power to make them efficient. In Feb- 
ruary, 1894, he was appointed by President 
Cleveland, and confirmed by the United 
States senate, as postmaster of Elgin, and 
served until February, 1898. His admin- 
istration of the office was such as to win 
the confidence and good will of all the 
patrons of the office of whatever political 
belief. 

As a business man Mr. Chapman is prob- 



ably best known. For about eight years 
he has been a director in the Century club, 
a business men's association, and as such 
has exerted an influence for good in behalf 
of his adopted city. Thoroughly progress- 
ive, he is ever ready to champion anything 
that will advance the best interests of Elgin. 
This fact is well known, and this it is which 
commends him to all business and profes- 
sional men, those on whose efforts the city 
relies for its growth and well-being. A cit- 
izen of the county for more than half a cen- 
tury, there is nothing that affords him more 
satisfaction than to see it take front rank 
among the counties of this great common- 
wealth, and to this end he is willing to bend 
all his energies. 



MILTON THORNTON, who is living 
retired in the city of Geneva, has been 
a resident of Kane county for more than 
sixty-one years, having located here in May, 
1837, at a time when the whole country 
was comparatively new, the cabins of the 
settlers being few and far between. He is 
a native of New Hampshire, born in the 
town of Thornton, Grafton county, October 
20, 1809. His father, William Thornton, 
was also a native of New Hampshire, and a 
direct descendant of Matthew Thornton, of 
national reputation, and one of the signers 
of the Declaration of Independence. He 
was a farmer in New Hampshire, and there 
spent his entire life. His wife was Polly 
Bagley, a daughter of Winthrop Bagley, a 
soldier in the Revolutionary war. 

Milton Thornton grew to manhood in 
his native state, and had but limited educa- 
tional advantages. He is mostly self-edu- 
cated, his knowledge, which is of a practical 
nature, being acquired since reaching ma- 
ture years. He remained on the home 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



farm with his father, assisting in its cultiva- 
tion until he was twenty-eight years old. 
He then came west by way of the New 
York & Erie canal and the great lakes, to 
Chicago, and crossed the Fox river at Gen- 
eva May 24, 1837. He at once took up a 
claim in the town of Virgil, Kane county, 
comprising a tract of two hundred and sev- 
enty-five acres, on which he built a dwell- ' 
ing house, and, fencing the land, began its 
improvement. In due time he had a splen- 
did farm, on which he resided for about 
forty years. He first built a small house, 
to which additions were later made. 

For seven years after his arrival in Kane 
county, Mr. Thornton lived a bachelor's 
life, and during that time suffered from fever 
and ague, the prevailing disease of that 
early time, and also endured all the hard- 
ships and privations incident to pioneer life. 
His first marriage was in June, 1844, when 
he married Miss Ruth Jenkins, a native of 
Columbia county, New York, who came to 
Illinois, with her father, Joseph Jenkins, who 
was also a pioneer of Kane county. There 
were two children by this union, both of 
whom died in childhood. This wife died Jan- 
uary 27, 1847, and Mr. Thornton next mar- 
ried Paulina Bunker, the wedding ceremony 
taking place December 23, 1847. She was 
a native of Columbia county, New York, 
and died May 16, 1876, at the age of sixty- 
five years. There were also two children by 
this marriage, and they also died in child- 
hood. In Campton township, May 31, 
1877, Mr. Thornton married Mary C. 
Thompson, a native of Greenbrier county, 
West Virginia, who came to Illinois in child- 
hood, and was reared in Kane county. Her 
father, Robert Thompson, was also a native 
of West Virginia, and one of the pioneers 
of Kane county. 



In early life Mr. Thompson was an old- 
line Whig, and cast his first presidential 
vote for Henry Clay in 1832. In 1840 he 
voted, in Kane county, for Harrison and 
Tyler, " Tippecanoe and Tyler too." Be- 
ing a strong anti-slavery man, and a be- 
liever in equal rights of all, he voted for 
John C. Fremont, in 1856, and has since 
been a stanch Republican, casting his last 
presidential vote at the age of eighty-seven 
for William McKinley and protection. He 
has never missed a presidential election 
since casting his first vote for that office. 
He has held several local positions of honor 
and trust, including township supervisor, 
justice of the peace, road commissioner, and 
in whatever position elected, made a faith- 
ful and efficient officer. He and his wife 
are members of the Unitarian church, be- 
ing a firm believer in its doctrines and ten- 
ets. By his exemplary habits and upright 
character he has won the respect and es- 
teem of all who know him. 



WILLIAM W. BALDWIN is one of 
the younger members of the legal 
profession in Elgin, but his ability is by no 
means limited by his years, and he has now 
gained a clientage and reputation that many 
an older attorney might well envy. A na- 
tive of Cooperstown, New York, born April 
9, 1870, he is a son of Philander and Esther 
(Laberdie) Baldwin, the former of German 
ancestry and the latter of French ancestry. 
The paternal grandfather of our subject was 
a man of considerable prominence in Coop- 
erstown, where he spent his entire life, and 
by speculation he became quite wealthy, 
but lost most of his money before his death. 
His son, Philander Baldwin, was a mason, 
contractor and builder for many years, but 



'4 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



now follows farming near Ottawa Lake, 
Michigan, where he and his wife now make 
their home. They are the parents of six 
children, all living: William W. ; Mrs. Min- 
nie Davidson, who resides in Wisconsin; 
Albert, in the Tri-State College, Toledo, 
Ohio; Philander, a resident of Toledo, Ohio; 
Wesley and John, still with their parents. 
The father of this family is a Jeffersonian 
Democrat in his political belief, and his 
wife is a Catholic in religious faith. 

William W. Baldwin obtained his edu- 
cation in the common schools and received 
few advantages in his youth to fit him for 
the practical and responsible duties of life. 
He was ambitious, however, and made the 
most of his opportunities. In 1887 he 
came to Elgin, where he continued his edu- 
cation by pursuing a commercial course, 
after which he took up the study of law. 
By correspondence he pursued a two-years' 
law course under the direction of the 
Sprague University, and then entered the 
law office of Frank E. Shopen, who in- 
structed him in the principles of jurispru- 
dence for two years, after which he was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Ottawa, Illinois, in De- 
cember, 1896. 

Mr. Baldwin at once returned to Elgin, 
opened an office ajid has since engaged in 
practice, meeting with gratifying success in 
his chosen calling. On the I5th of Sep- 
tember, 1897, ne formed a partnership with 
J. R. Powers, Jr., and the firm has attained 
considerable prominence in legal circles in 
Kane county. Mr. Baldwin was appointed 
notary public in 1895. 1 his business he 
has made a specialty of pension-law prac- 
tice, also patent-law, and in the latter divi- 
sion of jurisprudence he has handled a num- 
ber of very important cases with success. 
These have frequently called him to Wash- 



ington; and he has won some notable vic- 
tories in forensic encounters with men of 
high worth in the legal profession, a fact 
which plainly indicates his own ability. 
He is a member of the Chicago Law Stu- 
dents Association. 

In his political relations Mr. Baldwin is 
a Republican and served as delegate to the 
Illinois Lincoln Republican League at 
Springfield in 1894. Socially he is con- 
nected with the Knights of the Globe and 
the Sons of Veterans. He is also a valued 
member of the First Baptist church and a 
man of benevolent, kindly nature. 

Mr. Baldwin was married September 15, 
1897, in Elgin, to Miss May L. Smith, a 
daughter of Curtis A. and Mary (Crowfoot) 
Smith. Her father is a representative of 
one of the old families of Elgin and is now 
connected with the Elgin Watch Factory in 
the responsible position of foreman of one 
of the departments. Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin 
have a wide acquaintance and high standing 
in the social circles of Elgin and share in 
the warm regard of many friends. 



ISAAC H. WARREN, a prominent at- 
I torney of Elgin, with office in the Home 
Bank Building, is a man who thoroughly 
loves his profession, and is eminently gifted 
with the capabilities of mind which are in- 
dispensable at the bar. In preparing a case 
for trial every fact, however insignificant, 
is carefully studied and its possible relevancy 
to the merits of the case weighed and con- 
sidered. He is thoroughly familiar with 
authority and never at a loss for a prec- 
edent. 

Mr. Warren was born March 8, 1851, in 
Boone county, Illinois, and is a son of John 
and Anna (Church) Warren. His maternal 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



grandfather, William Church, was an Eng- 
lishman by birth and was a lieutenant in 
the English army, being in the service when 
Napoleon threatened to invade England. 
On coming to the United States William 
Church located in New York, where he fol- 
lowed the occupation of farming until his 
death. He married Miss Esther Deacon, 
and to them were born eight children five 
sons and three daughters of whom Mrs. 
Warren is the eldest. Two sons and all the 
daughters are still living, their average age 
being seventy-five years, and both in mind 
and body they are well preserved. 

John Warren, our subject's father, was 
born in England, in 1811, and when nine- 
teen years of age accompanied his parents 
on their emigration to America. He was 
one of a family of nine children five sons 
and four daughters. During his younger 
years he engaged in farming in the Empire 
state, but at an early day came to Illinois, 
and upon a farm in Boone county lived un^ 
til called from this life in 1884, at the age 
of seventy-three years. He was officially 
connected with the Congregational church, 
of which he and his wife were both earnest 
and faithful members. She is still living. 
Their children were as follows: J. W. , a 
salesman living in Omaha, Nebraska; A. G. , 
who died at the age of eighteen years; Isaac 
H., of this sketch; Etta, wife of W. W. 
Ware, a farmer of Batavia, New York; 
Josephine, deceased wife of Rev. M. N. 
Clark, a Congregational minister; and Del- 
la, wife of W. A. Whiting, a merchant of 
Poplar Grove, Illinois. 

Reared on the old farm in Boone county, 
Illinois, Isaac H. Warren obtained his early 
education in the public schools of the local- 
ity, and he was later a student in Beloit 
College, of Wisconsin, having secured the 



means to continue his studies by teaching 
for four years in the country schools. When 
his literary education was completed, he 
read law in the offices of several attorneys, 
and in January, 1891, was admitted to the 
bar, being licensed to practice before all the 
courts of the state. He at once opened an 
office in Elgin, and now enjoys a good 
practice. 

On the i6th of May, 1882, Mr. Warren 
was united in marriage with Miss Viola O. 
McAllister, daughter of S. McAllister, of 
Elgin, and to them have been born two 
daughters: Louie O. and Vera L. Mr. 
Warren is a member of the Congregational 
church, while his wife is a Baptist in relig- 
ious belief. Socially he is a prominent 
member of the Odd Fellows' lodge of Elgin, 
in which he is now serving as treasurer, and 
has passed through all the chairs in the 
Royal League, being past archon and deputy 
of the same. As a Republican he takes an 
active interest in political affairs, and has 
held some minor offices, including that of 
township collector and school director. In 
all the relations of life Mr. Warren displays 
that integrity of character that wins and 
holds the confidence of all with whom he 
comes in contact, and his many estimable 
traits of character have gained for him a 
host of warm friends. As a citizen he holds 
a prominent place in the regard of his fellow- 
townsmen. 



DANIEL VAN GORDER, a well-known 
contractor, and one of the -highly re- 
spected citizens of Elgin, living at No. 432 
Fulton street, is a native of New York, born 
May 15, 1830, near Aurora, on Lake Cay- 
uga, in the town of Scipio, Cayuga county, 
and is a son of John and Sarah (Helms) Van 



i6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Gorder, who were born in Pennsylvania, of 
Holland ancestry. Throughout his business 
career the father engaged in contracting and 
hotel keeping, conducting a popular hostelry 
in Geneseo, New York, for more than 
twenty years. He was widely and favor- 
ably known, and well deserved the reputa- 
tion he enjoyed of being one of the best 
landlords in his section of the state. He 
died August 20, 1852, aged sixty years, and 
his wife seven days later, at the age of fifty- 
nine. She was a devout and earnest Chris- 
tian woman, a faithful member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and the poor and 
needy were never turned from her door 
empty-handed. She was kind and obliging 
at all times, and her home was the favorite 
stopping place with the minister. Of her 
nine children, Daniel is the eighth in order 
of birth, but only three are now living, the 
others being Selah, a contractor and builder, 
residing in Elmira, .New York; and Amy, 
widow of Henry Boughton, and a resident 
of Galena, Kansas. 

The boyhood and youth of our subject 
were spent in his father's hotel at Geneseo, 
New York, which he visited a few years 
since, and in the public schools of that city 
he acquired his education. After leaving 
the school room he learned the painter's 
trade and for some years engaged in house 
painting, after which he was employed as 
clerk in hotels in New York City, Newark, 
New Jersey, and Rochester, New York. He 
began contracting in 1855, in New York, 
where he was employed as foreman on the 
Erie canal, but in 1857 came west, stop- 
ping first in Chicago. Subsequently he 
went to Dubuque, Iowa, and still later to 
Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, where he 
spent some years as a railroad contractor. 
He has engaged in the same business in 



many states, including Colorado, New York, 
Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Minne- 
sota, Iowa, Kansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, 
Arkansas, Alabama and Mississippi. From 
Memphis, Tennessee, he came to Elgin in 
1889, and here he has since made his home 
while continuing to engage in both railroad 
and general contracting. 

In 1849 was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Van Gorder and Miss Laura Welton, 
daughter of Amos Welton, of Canandaigua, 
New York, and to them was born a son, 
Charles, now a job printer and prominent 
citizen of Elgin, who married Hannah 
Bundy and has two children, Prentice and 
William. The first wife of our subject died 
in 1864, at the age of twenty-three years, 
and in 1866 he wedded Miss Susan Bundy 
by whom he has one daughter, Lucille, a 
proficient and popular music teacher, now 
connected with the Hecker's College of 
Music in Elgin. In religious belief the 
the mother is an Episcopalian. 

In 1859 Mr. Van Gorder was made a 
Mason at Prairie du Chien lodge. No. 106, 
F. & A. M., and has since affiliated with 
that fraternity. Politically he is not identi- 
fied with any party but votes independently, 
endeavoring to support the man best quali- 
fied for office regardless of party ties. As 
a citizen he ever stands ready to discharge 
every duty devolving upon him, and he has 
a large circle of friends and acquaintances 
in the various states where he has been 
located at different times throughout his 
active and useful career. 



JUDGE R. N. BOTSFORD, senior mem- 
J ber of the firm of Botsford, Wayne & 
Botsford, lawyers, Cook block, Elgin, is 
one of the truly representative members of 




JUDGE R. N. BOTSFORD. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the legal profession in Kane county. What- 
ever may be said of the legal fraternity, it 
cannot be denied that members of the bar 
have been more prominent actors in public 
affairs than any other class of the commun- 
ity. This is but the natural result of causes 
which are manifest and require no explana- 
tion. The ability and training which qual- 
ify one to practice law also qualify him in 
many respects for the duties which lie out- 
side the strict path of his profession and 
which touch the general interests of society. 
This is what makes him a leader of men 
and often leads him, sometimes in reality 
against his will, into the political arena, and 
in times of war into the military serv- 
ice as commander of regiments, brigades, 
divisions and corps. That the subject of 
this sketch has left his impress upon the 
history of Kane county, its annals for the 
past fifty years will duly attest. 

Richard N. Botsford was born in New- 
ton, Fairfield county, Connecticut, October 
28, 1830, and is a son of Austin N. and 
Volucia V. (Glover) Botsford, also natives 
of the same state, and the parents of eight 
children, five of whom are now living: 
Richard N., our subject; Eugene M., of 
Newton, Connecticut; Austin N., of Fort 
Dodge, Iowa; Caroline, wife of Edward 
Parsons, of Connecticut; and Alosia, wife 
of Reuben Johnson, of New Haven, Con- 
necticut. 

Austin N. Botsford, the father, was a 
man of marked ability, and by occupation 
was a farmer. He served his district as a 
member of the legislature, and was also a 
captain of the state militia. Religiously he 
was a Universalist. His death occurred in 
1842, at the age of forty-four years. After 
his death his wife married W. Northrup, 
who died many years ago. She lived to be 



eighty years of age, dying in 1894, in New 
Haven, Connecticut. 

The paternal grandfather, Philo Bots- 
ford, was a native of Connecticut, of Eng- 
lish stock. He was the father of two chil- 
dren. His death occurred at the age of 
seventy-eight years. The maternal grand- 
father Glover was also born in Connecticut 
and died at the age of about fifty years. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood in his native state and is a graduate of 
the State Normal School, at New Britain, 
Connecticut. For some years after his 
graduation he- taught school in Connecticut, 
Illinois, Wisconsin dnd Missouri. While 
engaged in teaching he read law, and in 
1857 was admitted to the bar in Black River 
Falls, Wisconsin. Removing to St. Charles, 
Kane county, for a time he was engaged in 
publishing a newspaper, and in 1858 com- 
menced the practice of law there. In 1869 
he removed to Elgin and has here continu- 
ously made his home from that time, en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession. 
While yet residing at St. Charles, in 1861, 
he was elected county judge and acceptably 
filled out a four-years' term. 

On the 2/th of December, 1860, Judge 
Botsford was united in marriage to Miss 
Ellen E. Bundy, daughter of P. E. and 
Pamelia (Lowell) Bundy. By this union 
two children were born, Carl E. and Alosia. 
The latter died in 1892 at the age of eight- 
een years. The former is now the junior 
member of the firm of Botsford, Wayne & 
Botsford. 

Politically Judge Botsford is a Democrat, 
and although he has always taken an active 
part in political affairs he has never been 
an office seeker. Business and professional 
interests have demanded of him his time, 
and he therefore left to others office seek- 



20 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ing. His reputation as an attorney secured 
him the nomination of his party for the of- 
fice of supreme judge, in June, 1897, but as 
his party is in a strong minority in the dis- 
trict, he failed of an election. That he 
would have creditably filled the position is 
acknowledged by all, especially the legal 
fraternity. 

The Judge comes of a long-lived race, 
his maternal grandmother living to be one 
hundred and two years old. Although near 
the three-score-and-ten mark, he is a well- 
preserved man with physical and mental 
abilities unabated. With the exception of 
a short time in Missouri and Wisconsin, he 
has been a resident of Kane county since 
1 85 1, and as stated, the impress of his mind 
has been left upon the county. He is hon- 
ored and respected by all. 



ELISHA WEED is a retired farmer living 
in the village of Hampshire, and is well 
and favorably known throughout Kane coun- 
ty. He was born in Bloomfield township, 
Trumbull county, Ohio, August 20, 1817. 
His educational advantages were such as 
were provided in the early days in his native 
county, when teachers were paid eight dol- 
lars a month and board around, many of 
them knowing but little more than some of 
their pupils. The school houses were built 
of logs and provided with wooden benches 
for seats. 

John Weed, the father of our subject, 
was born near Bangor, Maine, and by oc- 
cupation was a farmer. In the war of 1812 
he served two years as sergeant in a Maine 
regiment and was in the battle of Sackett's 
Harbor. In Ohio he married Jemima Big- 
elow, daughter of Timothy Bigelow, a sol- 
dier of the Revolutionary war, who came 



with the family to Ohio, where he died. 
His wife was a Miss Hovey. In 1815 Tim- 
othy Bigelow moved with his family from 
Vermont to Ohio, the father and son walk- 
ing all the way, the mother driving a four- 
horse wagon containing all their earthly 
possessions. In Cattaraugus county, New 
York, wolves killed one of their horses, and 
from there they drove three. They settled 
in Ohio when that was a wilderness and 
lived the life usual to pioneers. Of the nine 
children born to John and Jemima Weed, 
four are yet living, as follows: Elisha, our 
subject; George N., living in Ohio; Eliza- 
beth, wife of John Burns, of Hampshire; 
and William, who resides in Missouri. 

At the age of nineteen our subject went to 
Indiana, working in Bartholomew, Johnson, 
Floyd and Tippecanoe counties, at one time 
being employed on the old state road, from 
New Albany northwest. While at this work 
the contractor failed, and Mr. Weed could 
get no pay for his labor. The contractor 
promised to pay him, however, and agreed 
to keep him until he was paid. Mr. Weed 
walked one hundred miles to the contractor's 
home, where he remained for some time 
and was finally paid. For a time he rented 
land in Indiana and engaged in farming. 

On the roth of March, 1842, at Blue 
River, Bartholomew county, Indiana, Mr. 
Weed was united in marriage with Miss 
Julia A. Hartman, who was second in order 
of birth in a family of eleven children born 
to Francis and Magdeline (Gilbert) Hart- 
man, both of German origin. She was born 
near Little York. Pennsylvania, July 22, 
1822. A few years later her parents moved 
to Indiana and settled in Bartholomew 
county, at a time when the country was 
comparatively new, and where they had 
none of the comforts of their old Pennsyl- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



21 



vania home. The mother cried over the 
desolate outlook, but after a time became 
more contented. By this union there were 
five children: the first named died in infancy; 
Helen M. married E. L. Starks, of Starks 
Station, and died, leaving one daughter, 
Mabel H., while one child died in infancy; 
Francis W. married Rachel Dean, by whom 
he has four children, Carrie A., Harry, 
Edith and Frederick, and they reside in 
Sac county, Iowa; George A. married Jane 
Tait, and lives in Sac county, Iowa; and 
Frederick P. A., who married Harriet Plum- 
mer, and lives on the old home farm. 

In 1845 Mr. Weed came to Kane coun- 
ty, Illinois, traveling by wagon drawn by 
oxen, and located in Hampshire township, 
where he bought forty acres on section 27, 
to which he later added one hundred and 
twenty acres. His deeds, signed by James 
K. Polk, then president of the United States, 
have never been transferred. Deer, wolves 
and wild game abounded in the country at 
that time and the few neighbors were very 
far apart. It was nearly all raw, unbroken 
prairie and timber. 

Mr. Weed is a member of the Masonic 
order, and is the last of the charter mem- 
bers living, of Hampshire lodge, No. 443. 
He has been a Mason for over forty years. 
In early life he was a Whig, his first vote 
being for William H. Harrison, in 1840. 
Since the formation of the Republican party 
he has been a strong advocate of its princi- 
ples, and has voted his party's ticket. In 
early life he served as constable, road com- 
missioner, school director and in other 
minor official positions. He is now one of 
the solid and substantial men of Hampshire 
township. The conditions of life now ex- 
isting are very different from what they 
were when Mr. and Mrs. Weed came to 



Kane county, a young married couple. Mrs. 
Weed learned to spin, weave linen and 
wool, and in early days made all the clothes 
for herself and family. After a long and 
useful life they are now living in retirement, 
enjoying the fruits of their former toil, and 
surrounded by those who have intimately 
known them in days gone by. 



JOHN R. POWERS, of the firm of 
Baldwin & Powers, attorneys of Elgin, 
was born in the city which is still his place of 
residence, April 6, 1870, his parents being 
John and Johanah (Sutton) Powers, who 
were natives of Ireland and Illinois respect- 
ively. The father was a cooper by trade, 
and at the beginning of the Rebellion he laid 
aside all business cares and offered his 
services to the Union, enlisting as a mem- 
ber of the Fifty-second Illinois Infantry, 
with which he went to the front. After- 
ward he joined Company K, Sixteenth New 
York Cavalry, serving during the greater 
part of the war as a scout. His command 
often engaged in skirmishes with Mosby's 
cavalry, and in one of these engagements 
he was wounded, and was sent to a hospital 
in Washington. A few days after his re- 
covery he was sent out with a company to 
hunt up Booth, the assassin, and was in the 
command that captured him. After his 
return from the war he secured a position 
on the police force of Elgin and served 
creditably in that capacity until he was 
chosen for the office of city marshal in 1870. 
For eighteen years he filled the latter posi- 
tion, discharging his duties with marked 
fidelity and ability, a fact which is plainly 
indicated by his long continuance in office. 
On his retirement from that position he 
was elected supervisor and served for one 



22 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



term, after which he filled the office of con- 
stable, was then deputy sheriff, and was at 
one time alderman from the Seventh ward. 
When he left the office of marshal he pur- 
chased a half interest in the Elgin Ice Com- 
pany, with which he was connected for two 
years. In 1897 he was again appointed 
marshal by Mayor Price, and is now serv- 
ing in that capacity. In politics he is a 
stanch Republican, and is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic, the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He has a family of 
five living children John R. , May, Celia 
A., Mabel and Charles L., and has lost one 
daughter, Nellie. 

John R. Powers, of this review, pur- 
sued his elementary education in the public 
schools of Elgin and afterward attended the 
Elgin Academy. At the same time he read 
law with the firm of Botsford & Wayne, and 
and was admitted to the bar at Ottowa in 
June, 1897. He soon afterward entered 
into partnership with W. W. Baldwin, 
under the firm style of Baldwin & Powers, 
and the firm is now enjoying a fair clientage. 
They have pleasant offices in the Spurling 
Block, and they have already met with 
creditable success, while the business is 
constantly increasing. Mr. Powers is a 
young man of strong intellectuality and ex- 
cellent business ability, and has the energy 
which always overcomes obstacles and 
ultimately reaches the goal of success. He 
is now holding the position of first sergeant 
in General W. F. Lynch camp, Sons of 
Veterans, also secretary of the Philomenian 
Club, and a member of several other social 
organizations. He has many friends in the 
community in which his entire life has been 
passed, and enjoys the confidence and respect 
of all. 



MOSES H. THOMPSON. The sub- 
ject of this sketch has been almost a 
lifelong resident of Kane county, having 
come here with his parents in 1834, when 
but one year old. His father, Captain 
Thomas H. Thompson came to Chicago in 

1833, returned to Plattsburg, New York, in 

1834, and at once removed his family to 
Illinois, settling in Du Page county, and 
from there removed to Fox river valley in 

1835, settling in what is now Dundee town- 
ship, Kane county. Like all country boys 
in pioneer days, Mr. Thompson remained 
at home, working on his father's farm until 
twenty-one years of age. 

When wishing for a broader and bet- 
ter education than could be obtained 
at the public schools, he took a course in 
civil engineering, which profession he fol- 
lowed for many years, beginning in the Ga- 
lena and Dubuque lead mines about in 1858, 
and then upon government surveys and the 
early railroad lines west of the Mississippi. 
About 1860 he concluded to abandon the 
engineering and surveying business and en- 
gage in map publishing, which he did, con- 
fining himself almost exclusively to county 
map work, being the pioneer publisher in 
the west to show the name of each land 
owner upon each tract. This business was 
extended over nearly all of the northwestern 
states. In Illinois alone nearly one-third 
of the entire state was thus mapped. These 
maps were made so thorough and complete 
that copies were added to many of the 
libraries of the most prominent geograph- 
ical societies of the world. 

In 1872 Mr. Thompson became con- 
nected with the Elgin Gas Light Company, 
as its secretary and manager, in which po- 
sition he continued about ten years. He 
then became identified with the South- 




M. H. THOMPSON. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



western Lumber Company, as president 
and manager, but after four years' active 
management of the company's affairs, on 
account of ill health, it was determined to 
sell the property of the company, consist- 
ing of mills and pine lands in the state of 
Arkansas. After this Mr. Thompson re- 
turned to Elgin, his old home, where he 
has since resided. In 1864 he purchased 
one of the largest farms in Dundee town- 
ship, from which time he has been largely 
engaged in the dairy business, and was 
among the first to make Elgin a pronounced 
dairy district. He was the first secretary 
of the Illinois State Dairymen's Association 
and continued as such for several years, al- 
ways taking an interest in whatever per- 
tains to the dairy interest of the state of 
Illinois. Mr. Thompson is now serving as 
president of the Elgin National Bank and 
has been since its organization in 1892. 
He is also president of the Old Settlers' 
Association of Fox River Valley. He is a 
member of the Lakeside, Century and Wal- 
tonian .Clubs. In politics he is a stanch 
Republican, his father, Captain T. H. 
Thompson being one of the founders of 
that party. 

In 1862 Mr. Thompson was married to 
Miss Clarissa I. -Miller, daughter of David 
and Clarissa Miller, and to them have been 
born two children: Walter M. and Clara I. 
Walter M. married Miss Elizabeth Cliff, 
December 16, 1885, and they have two 
children: Arthur C. and Kathryn. Clara 
I. was married to John A. Carlisle in 1891, 
and they now have one son, Donald T. 
The parents of our subject, Captain T. 
H. and Sarah (Hoit) Thompson, were na- 
tives of Maine and Plattsburg, New York, 
respectively. The mother was a daughter 
of Colonel' Moses X. Hoit, who, as well as 



his ancestors, was among the foremost to 
make history during the American Revolu- 
tion. The paternal ancestors of our sub- 
ject were also among the defenders of the 
rights of this country. 



DEWITT C. ADAMS, now living a re- 
tired life in the city of Dundee, but 
who for years was one of the active, enter- 
prising and respected business men of this 
section of the state, is numbered among the 
old settlers who date their residence in Illi- 
nois since 1842. He was born in Cortland 
county, New York, January 29, 1824, and 
is of English descent, the family coming to 
this country at a very early date in its his- 
tory, William Adams, his father, was born 
in Saratoga, -Northumberland county, New 
York, in 1784, and wfesvthe son of Oliver 
Adams, also born in New York. Oliver 
Adams moved to Cortland county about 
1 804, and there made a home in the wilder- 
ness, where he reared his family. William 
Adams married Phebe Lewis, also a native 
of New York. After residing in Cortland 
county a number of years he removed to 
Syracuse, New York, and resided there four 
yeafs. In 1842 he came to Illinois and set- 
tled in Cook county, where he spent the re- 
mainder of his life, dying at the residence 
of his son, DeWitt C. , in 1859. His wife 
survived him five years, passing away Jan- 
uary i, 1864. They were laid to rest in the 
cemetery at Dundee. William Adams was 
a well-posted man and while taking an act- 
ive interest in political affairs never sought 
nor would he hold public office. 

In the family of William and Phebe 
Adams were three sons and two daughters 
who grew to mature years, as follows: Maria, 
wife of John Van Hoesen, of Hastings, Min- 



26 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



nesota. Oliver, who was for many years a 
publisher of school records in Chicago, is 
now deceased. He was well-known through- 
out the state and elsewhere among educators 
as the publisher of Adams School Records 
and various school supplies which are yet 
used to some extent. DeWitt C. , our sub- 
ject, is next in order of birth. Harriet S. 
married Edward F. Wells, with whom she 
removed to San Diego, California, where 
she died. John C., who resides in Chicago, 
is a practical jeweler and was one of the 
original founders of the Elgin watch fac- 
tory. He is now living a retired life. One 
daughter, Betsy, died at the age of fourteen 
years. 

The boyhood and youth of our subject 
were spent in Cortland county, and in the 
city of. Syracuse, New York. He had fair 
educational advantages, which he improved 
as well as possible, but is mostly a self-edu- 
cated man. He was eighteen years of age 
when he came with the family to Cook 
county, Illinois. For three winters after his 
arrival there he taught in the public schools, 
being one of the pioneer teachers of Cook 
county. His life work, however, was that 
of a farmer. Soon after coming of age he 
purchased two hundred forty acres of land 
in Barrington township, which he put under 
a high state of cultivation and on which he 
resided for many years. In 1883 he rented 
the place and moved to Dundee, purchased 
some lots and built his present residence. 
Previous to this, however, he had become 
interested in business in that city, having 
become part owner in a lumber and coal 
yard. After his removal to the city he took 
an active part in the management of the 
business for several years, but lately sold 
out and is now practically living a retired 
life. 



Mr. Adams was married in Elgin No- 
vember 25, 1852, to Mary E. Harvey, a 
native of New York, born in Herkimer 
county, and a daughter of David Harvey, a 
pioneer settler of Plato township, Kane 
county. She was reared in this county, 
and received her education in the schools of 
Elgin. For some years previous to her 
marriage she was a successful teacher in 
the public schools. She died at her home 
in Dundee, February 19, 1895, leaving one 
son and one daughter. The son, William 
H., is now a business man residing in Chi- 
cago, while the daughter, Mary E., yet re- 
sides at home, and is her father's house- 
keeper. She is a well-educated lady, a 
graduate of the Loring Young Ladies' School 
of Chicago. One daughter, Carrie, died at 
the age of seven years, while one son, Louie, 
died at the age of two and a half years, and 
another, Charles, died at the age of nine 
months. 

In early- life Mr. Adams was an old-line 
Whig, and, like his father, was a strong be- 
liever in the principles of that party. A 
friend of liberty, he united with the Repub- 
lican party on its organization, and voted 
for its first presidential candidate; John C. 
Fremont, in 1856. Being a strong temper- 
ance man, he has of late identified himself 
with the Prohibition party. He has ever 
been a friend of education and the public 
schools, and has at all times used his influ- 
ence in their behalf. Religiously he is a 
Baptist, of which church he has been a 
member for forty-eight years. The cause 
of the Master has ever been dear to his 
heart, and he has ever been willing to sac- 
rifice time and money to advance its inter- 
ests. For some years he was an active 
member of the Masonic fraternity, but of 
late has been dimitted. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



27 



When Mr. Adams came to Illinois he 
had but little of this world's goods, but by 
his own labor and enterprise he has accu- 
mulated a valuable property, and is recog- 
nized as one of the substantial men of Kane 
county. He is a man of exemplary habits, 
of upright character and worth, and has the 
confidence and esteem of all who know him, 
and his friends are numerous both through- 
out Kane and Cook counties. 

In the summer of 1895 Mr. Adams and 
his daughter made a trip to Europe, visiting 
a number of the cities and kingdoms of that 
land. They first visited Glasgow and North 
Scotland, including Edinburgh, through some 
of the German states and Switzerland, Paris, 
Venice, Rome, London and Liverpool, and 
altogether had a pleasant and profitable time. 
They returned home in the fall of the same 
year, feeling well repaid for the time and 
money spent. 

REV. CASPER J. HUTH, the popular 
priest in charge of St. Charles Catholic 
church at Hampshire, Illinois, was born in 
Cologne, Germany, September 22, 1845, an d 
with the family emigrated to America in 
1855, leaving their home May 27, sailing 
from Antwerp June i, and landing in New 
York, June 17. His father, Peter Huth, 
was born in Cologne, September 15, 1819, 
and in his native country worked as a day 
laborer. With a view of bettering his con- 
dition he came to the United States and 
settled in Freeport, Illinois, where he made 
his home the remainder of his life, with the 
exception of a short time spent with our 
subject in Hampshire. Shortly before his 
death he returned to Freeport and died at 
the residence of his daughter, January 29, 
1898. On coming to this country he 
secured work with the Chicago, Milwaukee 



& St. Paul railroad, in whose services he 
remained for many years, filling various 
positions, and for a number of years before 
retiring had charge of the roundhouse at 
Freeport. His life though an uneventful 
one, he so lived as to merit the confidence 
and esteem of his fellow men. In his 
native city he married Cecelia Mevis, who 
became the mother of four children as fol- 
lows: Caspar J., our subject; Mary, who 
died at the age of eleven years; Clara, who 
married John Zengerle, of Still water, Minne- 
sota; and Theresa, wife of Charles Seeker, 
of Freeport, Illinois, with whom the father 
made his home at the time of death. 

While yet residing in Germany, our 
subject attended the parochial schools, 
which he also attended after coming to 
Freeport, and which was supplemented by 
attendance in the public schools of Free- 
port. He began his theological studies in 
the University of St. Louis, at St. Louis, 
Missouri, and later attended St. Mary's of 
the Lake, at Chicago, Illinois, where he re- 
mained seven years, and was then a short 
time in St. Francis College, Milwaukee, 
where he was ordained to the priesthood 
January 29, 1869. 

Father Huth's ministry has been an 
unusual one in the length of time which he 
served at his various stations. His first 
charge was at Somonauk, De Kalb county, 
Illinois, where he remained fifteen and a 
half years, then took a vacation for six 
months, at the expiration of which time he 
was assigned to St. Charles church, in 
Hampshire. This was in the spring of 
1885, since which time he has ministered to 
the spiritual wants of the congregation of 
that village, in sickness and in health, at 
the bridal altar, and at the bier. He is a 
man of energy and strong mental vigor, and 



28 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



is greatly esteemed by Catholics and Prot- 
estants alike. One of his most pleasant 
recollections, is that of a visit while at 
Somonauk, of Archbishop, now Cardinal, 
Gibbons, who was visiting Bishop Froley, 
of Chicago. Many years after, at a large 
gathering of clergymen, at which the Cardi- 
nal was present, the latter recalled the visit 
and asked if the young priest who officiated 
at Somonauk was present, and when he 
was presented to him, gave the Father Huth 
a most cordial greeting. 

After an absence of more than forty 
years from his native land, Father Huth 
now contemplates a trip abroad to revisit 
the place of his birth and greet his kindred 
whom he has not seen since boyhood. His 
many friends in Kane and De Kalb counties 
will wish him a pleasant journey and a safe 
return to take up the work of ministering to 
fallen humanity. 



CHARLES P. REID, M. D., Hamp- 
shire, Illinois, is recognized as one of 
the best physicians in the north part of 
Kane county. He was born near Kingston, 
Frontenac county, Canada, October 16, 
1848, and with his parents came to Kane 
county, Illinois. His father, David Reid, 
was born near Aiken Claurie, about thirty- 
five miles south of Glasgow, Scotland, Feb- 
ruary 13, 1813. His early life was spent 
in his native country, and in 1833, when 
twenty years of age, he emigrated to Canada, 
sailing from Campbellton on the vessel Mar- 
garet, of Londonderry. The voyage re- 
quired three months, the vessel landing at 
(,)uebec. Two years later he was followed 
by his father, John Reid, the family settling 
near Kingston, in Frontenac county, where 
he lived seventeen years. John Reid, the 



father of David, bought a farm of two hun- 
dred acres near Kingston, where his death 
occurred about 1852. His wife, Martha 
Armour, died about 1859. She was the 
daughter of William and Margaret Armour. 
John Reid was the son of William Reid, 
who married a Miss Gordon, and both died 
in Scotland. 

In 1848, David Reid came to Kane coun- 
ty, Illinois, on a prospecting tour, and liking 
the country purchased a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Hampshire township, 
returned home and in the spring of 1850, 
moved here with his family. He is now 
living with his daughter on the old home- 
stead, where he spent nearly half a cen- 
tury. At one time he was the owner of 
three hundred and sixty acres, forty acres 
of which he later sold, leaving him the 
possessor of the south half of section 17. 
He was a good farmer, a good citizen, and 
good neighbor, and is yet living at the age 
of eighty-five years, but in ill health from a 
stroke of paralysis. While yet residing in 
Canada, he married Olive Powley, a native 
of Frontenac county, Canada, born in April, 
1813. Her death occurred at the family 
residence on section 17, Hampshire town- 
ship, in 1871. She was the daughter of 
William Powley, a native of Pennsylvania, 
who attained the age of ninety years, and 
who married Elizabeth Hoffman. His par- 
ents lived in America prior to the Revolu- 
tionary war, but after the close of that 
struggle returned to their native country, 
Germany', but some years later again emi- 
grated to the states. About the time of 
the outbreak of the war of 1812, William 
Powley moved to Canada, where he secured 
a good farm and passed the remainder of 
his life. He often related to his children, 
how at one time in the forest he ran out of 




C. P. REID, M. D. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



provisions, and killed, cooked and ate a 
rattlesnake, which he always declared was, 
under the circumstances, very good. Of 
the four children born to David and Olive 
Reid, three are yet living as follows: John, 
a speculator and banker of Kansas City, 
Kansas. Dr. Charles P., our subject. Mar- 
tha, wife of Alexander R. Walker, lives on 
the old home farm, and ministers to, and 
cares for her aged father, in his affliction. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
public schools of Hampshire and the Elgin 
Academy, and for one year at Clark Semi- 
nary, now Jennings Seminary, in Aurora. 
He then taught school during six winter 
terms, being occupied with farm work dur- 
ing the summer seasons. He began teach- 
ing at the age of nineteen. Previous to 
this he began reading medicine, reading 
privately fora time and then in the office of 
Doctor Kelly, of Elgin. He then attended 
Bennett's Medical College of Chicago, from 
which he was graduated in 1872. He also 
studied pharmacy in Chicago, in the Phar- 
maceutical College, passing examination, 
and was for three years engaged in phar- 
macy in that city. In 1875 he began the 
practice of his profession in Hampshire, 
where he remained until 1888, when he 
joined his brother in Kansas City, Kansas, 
practicing there until 1894, when he re- 
turned to Hampshire. Since his first ad- 
mission to practice, Dr. Reid has kept 
abreast of the times by occasional courses 
in medical colleges, having attended two 
courses of lectures in the Chicago Medical 
College, and one in Hahnemann, of the 
same city. In the summer of 1898, he pro- 
poses to again take a post-graduate course, 
obtaining a knowledge of the improved 
methods of medicine and surgery. 

Dr. Reid, on the 6th of February, 1877, 



married Rosamond Heath, a native of Ger- 
many, who died in Kansas City, Kansas, 
August 16, 1889, leaving one child, Guy, a 
pupil in the Hampshire High School. Two- 
children, Olive and Mayne, died in in- 
fancy. 

Dr. Reid delights in scientific subjects, 
and is of an inventive turn of mind. Among 
the creations of his inventive genius, may 
be mentioned an improved electric alarm, 
which gives warning when wires are cut or 
disabled, as well as when the apartment is 
surreptitiously entered.. The fault with 
prior inventions has been 'that they get out 
of order and give no warning as to their 
condition. '"->. 

Dr. Reid is prominent in business and 
social circles and was for eight years presi- 
dent of the village board, and for six years 
was a member of the school board. He is 
a member of the Masonic lodge at Hamp- 
shire, in which he has filled all the chairs, 
and is a member of the Foresters and 
Knights of the Maccabees. A genial, 
wholesouled gentleman, he enjoys the es- 
teem of the people amongst whom he has 
lived for nearly half a century. 



f>EORGE P. HARVEY. The subject 
vj of this review is one whose history 
touches the pioneer epoch in the annals of 
Kane county and whose days were an in- 
tegral part of that indissoluble chain which 
linked the early, formative period with that 
of later-day progress and prosperity. He 
has borne an important part in the upbuild- 
ing of this section of the state and his name 
deserves an honored place among its prom- 
inent pioneers. He is now living at No. 
208 Kimball street. 

Mr. Harvey was born December 22, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1816, in Ontario county, New York, a son 
of Joel and Polly (Bennett) Harvey. On 
the paternal side he is of English descent. 
His great-grandfather was Medad Harvey, 
while his grandfather was Joel Harvey, Sr., 
a farmer by occupation, who removed from 
New Hampshire to New York at an early 
day, locating near Utica, where he died at 
the age of seventy years. Our subject's 
maternal grandfather spent his last days in 
Herkimer county, New York. 

Joel Harvey, Jr. , was a native of Mas- 
sachusetts, but spent the greater part of his 
early life upon a farm twelve miles east of 
Utica, New York. He married Polly Ben- 
nett, a native of Connecticut, and they be- 
came the parents of six children, who grew 
to man and womanhood. Four are still 
living, namely: George P. ; Emily, wife of 
Paul R. Wright, of Santa Barbara, Califor- 
nia, Sarah, wife of Major W. M. Taylor, of 
Chicago, Illinois; and Joel D., of Geneva, 
Illinois. The father was a blacksmith by 
trade. In 1835 he came by team to Illi- 
nois, accompanied by all the members of 
his family with the exception of our subject, 
who made the trip by water, as their goods 
were shipped in that way. They were fol- 
lowed by their faithful dog, who was very 
watchful of their possessions, not permitting 
a stranger to touch anything. The dog 
considered all Indians his enemies. The 
family arrived in Kane county in October, 
1835, at which time there were only two 
log houses on the present site of Elgin, one 
on either side of the river. The father 
took up a claim of three hundred acres in 
the northern part of the town of St. Charles 
and improved and cultivated the place until 
his death, which occurred in 1840, at the 
age of forty-six. He took quite a prominent 
and influential part in public affairs, served 



as treasurer of Kane county for one term, 
was justice of the peace several years, and 
held various township offices. He was a 
soldier of the war of 1812. and was always 
a loyal and patriotic citizen. His estimable 
wife long survived him, dying June 10, 
1872, at the age of seventy-four. 

Mr. Harvey, of this review, was reared 
eight miles west of Syracuse, in Onondaga 
county, New York, on a farm, and com- 
pleted his education in the academy in Bald- 
winsville. He was nineteen years of age 
when he came to Illinois, and in 1837 
he purchased a farm of his own in Kane 
county, containing three hundred and twenty 
acres, which he improved and cultivated 
until his removal to Elgin, in 1848. Here 
he has since made his home with the excep- 
tion of two years spent upon a farm in Elgin 
township. He built a large warehouse on 
the east side of the river for the Northwest- 
ern railroad in 1850-51, and had charge of 
the same for a number of years, storing all 
kinds of goods and grain. Later, in part- 
nership with George W. Renwick, he en- 
gaged in the manufacture of threshing ma- 
chines. 

On the 1 3th of November, 1839, Mr. 
Harvey married Miss Mary L. Burr, a daugh- 
ter of Atwell and Betsy (Wheeler) Burr, 
who came to Kane county from Pompey, 
Onondaga county, New York, in the spring 
of 1836, and first settled in St. Charles. 
Later they removed to Campton township, 
where they purchased land and continued 
to make their home until called from this 
life. They were of English descent, and 
Mrs. Burr was born and reared at the foot 
of the Hoosac mountains. Mr. Burr also 
aided in the war of 1812, and died about 
1 85 1 . 

Of the ten children born to Mr. and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mrs. Harvey, four sons died in infancy. 
The others are as follows: Charles M. en- 
listed in the Seventh Illinois Infantry, under 
the first call for three-months' men, and 
after the expiration of his term re-enlisted 
in the Plato Cavalry, his company being 
first assigned to the Thirty-sixth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, and later to the Fif- 
teenth Illinois Cavalry, serving as first lieu- 
tenant of Company B. Re-enlisting again 
as a veteran, he served until the close 
of the war. He was with Sherman's army 
on the celebrated march from Atlanta to 
the sea, and was once slightly wounded 
while carrying dispatches. He married 
Clara E. Conger and lived in Waco, Texas, 
at which place he and his wife and daugh- 
ter all died. Welford W. makes his home 
on a ranch near Buffalo, in Wyoming. He 
married Mrs. Mary E. Orr, by whom he 
has one son, Ray Phelps, and she has two 
daughters by her former marriage Minnie 
and Nellis. Cecil C. was formerly a suc- 
cessful teacher for a number of years, but 
for the past fourteen years has been libra- 
rian of the city library of Elgin. Mary E. 
is also at home. Estelle E. is the wife of 
William Freck, a machinist and inventor 
living in Chicago, and they have three chil- 
dren Florence, Howard B. and Margaret 
Loraine. Illione is a writer in an insurance 
office in Chicago. The wife and mother 
passed away September 19, 1895, when 
almost seventy-eight years of age. She 
was a member of the Universalist church, 
which her husband also attends. 

With Mr. Harvey resides his aunt, Mrs. 
Emily (Harvey) Ainsworth, who in 1843 
came to McHenry county, Illinois, but later 
spent a short time in Missouri. On her re- 
turn to this state she located in Richview 
and subsequently removed to St. Charles, 



where she had three sisters living, all now 
deceased. For the past twelve years she 
has made her home in Elgin, and is now 
eighty-eight years of age. 

Mr. Harvey has ever been one of the 
popular and prominent citizens of the 
county, and in early life took quite an active 
and influential part in public affairs. In the 
fall of 1854 he was elected county treasurer, 
and two years later was made alderman of 
the third ward of Elgin, serving in that 
capacity for six years. Subsequently he 
filled the office of assessor of Elgin town- 
ship for two terms. He also served as in- 
ternal revenue assessor for Kane county two 
years. From 1860 until 1862, he lived on 
his farm, but in the latter year returned to 
Elgin, where he has since continued to re- 
side. For sixty-two years he has been 
identified with the interests of the county, 
has seen almost its entire development, as 
on his arrival here the Indians were far 
more numerous than the white settlers and 
most of the land was still in its primitive 
condition. He is now the oldest member 
of Kane lodge, I. O. O. F. , with which he 
has been connected since 1851. Although 
eighty-one years of age he is still well pre- 
served. Nature deals kindly with the man 
who abuses not her laws, and although his 
business cares have been extensive age rests 
lightly upon him. It is safe to say that no 
man in Elgin has more or warmer friends 
than George P. Harvey. 



THOMAS BISHOP, deceased, was a na- 
tive of Devonshire, England, born Sep- 
tember 12, 1820, and at the age of eight 
years accompanied his parents across the 
ocean to Canada, the family locating in 
Quebec, in the schools of which locality he 



34 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



completed his education, which was begun 
in the mother country. After entering upon 
his business career he became interested in 
lumber and operated large tracts of forest 
land. He served as captain in the militia 
while in Quebec, and was a leading citizen 
of the community in which he made his 

home. 

After his mother's death he and three 

brothers, accompanied their father, Nathan- 
iel Bishop, to Kane county, Illinois. The 
four sons secured work as farm hands, 
Thomas and one brother working on a farm 
on section 22, Elgin township, Henry and 
the other brother on a farm on section 
28. After two years Thomas and Will- 
iam purchased a farm of two hundred 
and twenty-five acres, on which they 
had been employed, and Henry and his 
brother purchased the farm on section 28. 
In a few years two of the brothers went to 
Clinton, Illinois, and with the financial as- 
sistance of Thomas and Henry established 
themselves in the grain business, which they 
conducted with good success until their life 
labors were ended, winning a comfortable 
competence by their judicious management 
and untiring industry. 

Immediately after becoming owner of 
the farm on section 22, Elgin township, 
Thomas Bishop began its further develop- 
ment and improvement and in 1856 erected 
the present commodious residence, which is 
one of the land marks of the neighborhood. 
He employed only common laborers to help 
him and laid the masonry, which is a fine 
specimen of cobble-stone range work, with 
his own hands. He also did the interior 
finishing and the home to-day stands as a 
monument of his thrift and enterprise. It 
has very substantial and thick walls like the 
edifices of the old countries, built to stand 



for centuries. When he arrived in Kane 
county it was a wild and largely unsettled 
district. There was a stage road over the 
prairie and across his farm and all was open 
country. He hauled his produce to the Chi- 
cago market, finding there a little city just 
coming into prominence by reason of its 
shipping facilities. During the early years 
he also became an extensive stock trader, 
selling large numbers of cattle to the distil- 
lery companies and to the beef canning 
companies. He placed his land under a 
high state of cultivation until the well-tilled 
fields yielded to him a golden tribute and 
his farm became one of the best improved 
in the county. Neither was his attention 
given entirely to agricultural pursuits. He 
was a man of broad capability and made 
judicious investments in other business con- 
cerns which brought to him a handsome 
revenue. He was one of the organizers and 
stockholders of the Home National Bank, in 
which he served as a member of the director- 
ate and was at one time a stockholder in the 
Elgin Canning Company. A man of strong 
personality he also took a leading part in 
local affairs and his influence and support 
were important factors in promoting the 
welfare of the community. He did efficient 
service in the interest of the public schools 
during his many years service as school 
director, and for about fourteen years he 
served as road commissioner, while for eight 
years he filled the office of supervisor, dis- 
charging all these duties with marked fidel- 
ity and promptness. He held membership 
in the Universalist church, and gave his po- 
litical support to the men and measures of 
the Republican party. 

Thomas Bishop was united in marriage 
to Miss Emma Stringer, who was born in 
Kane county, March 19, 1848, a daughter 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



35 



of John A. and Ann (Sterricker) Stringer. 
Her father was born in Devonshire, England, 
July 20, 1807, and died June 17, 1895. He 
removed from England to Canada, at the 
age of fifteen years, resided for a time in 
New York, and in September, 1845, came 
to Kane county, where he acquired three 
hundred and forty acres of land on section 
29, Elgin township. In early years he was 
a grain farmer, and later became largely in- 
terested in dairy farming. His parents were 
Richard and Hannah (Garbet) Stringer. 
The former died in Canada, about 1822, at 
the age of sixty years, and the latter attained 
the advanced age of ninety- four years. Mrs. 
Ann Stringer, mother of Mrs. Thomas Bish- 
op, was born near London, England, June 
7, 1816, and is now living in California with 
her daughter. She is still a well-preserved 
old lady, able to walk a number of miles, 
and took a long journey across the continent 
without great fatigue. Her parents were 
Rev. Thomas and Jane (Williams) Sterricker, 
the former a Methodist minister, who spent 
the greater part of his life in Cherry Valley, 
Otsego county, New York, where he died at 
the age of fifty-five years, while his wife 
passed away at the age of seventy-four. 

By the marriage of Thomas Bishop and 
Emma Stringer were born six children: 
Clarence, of whom further mention is made 
in this sketch; Florence, his twin sister, who 
died at the age of six months; Frank, who 
died at the age of three months; Birdie, wife 
of A. M. Srnythe, a jeweler, of Elgin; Wil- 
bur and Walter, who are living in Elgin 
with their mother. The father of this fam- 
ily was called to the home beyond October 
5, 1891, in his sixty-ninth year, and the 
community thereby lost one of its most val- 
ued citizens a man whom to know was to 
honor. He was true to every trust reposed 



in him, whether public or private; his hon- 
esty in all business transactions was above 
question; and he commanded the unqual- 
ified respect of those with whom he was 
brought in contact. He bore an important 
part in the work of development in Kane 
county, and "his name will always be linked 
with those pioneers who laid the foundation 
for the present prosperity and advancement 
of this community. 

CLARENCE BISHOP, the eldest son of 
Thomas and Emma Bishop, was born on 
the farm which is now his home, March 6, 
1870. His elementary education, acquired 
in the district schools, was supplemented by 
study in the Elgin Academy and in Drew's 
Business College. At the age of eighteen 
years he put aside his text-books and be- 
came his father's able assistant on the farm, 
continuing his work with him until the fa- 
ther's death. He then operated the place 
for his mother until his marriage, in 1895, 
since which time he has leased the property 
from the estate. This is one of the best 
farms in the county, improved with large 
barns and outbuildings, supplied with a wind- 
mill connected with a well two hundred and 
sixty-five feet deep, which furnishes an in- 
exhaustible supply of good water. There is 
also a mill and feed grinder and a twelve-horse 
power steam engine, and the fire appliances 
can throw a stream of water over any build- 
ing on the farm. There is an ice-house 
with a capacity of one hundred tons, and 
thus upon his own place Mr. Bishop has all 
of the conveniences of city life. His land 
is sufficiently rolling to make good drainage, 
and is under a very high state of cultivation. 
He, however, raises hay and grain mostly 
for his stock, for he is a dairy farmer and 
keeps on hand from sixty to seventy head of 
high-grade cattle. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mr. Bishop was united in marriage with 
Miss Emma L. Schumacher, a native of 
Pekin, Illinois, and a daughter of Rev. 
Henry Schumacher, who was born in Ohio, 
and died in Elgin April 25, 1885. He was 
a minister of the Evangelical church, and 
for twenty-five years was a member of the 
Illinois conference. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Susanna Klick, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, and now resides in Elgin. 

Mr. Bishop is a member of the Univer- 
salist church, in which he has served as 
trustee for six years; gives his political sup- 
port to the Republican party, and is an in- 
fluential factor in the political circles in 
Kane county. He is now serving his sec- 
ond term as school trustee, is a member of 
the Lincoln Republican club, of Elgin, and 
has been a delegate to the state Republican 
convention in Springfield. He is a man of 
excellent business and executive ability, 
whose sound judgment, unflagging enter- 
prise and capable management have brought 
to him a well- merited success. In manner 
he is pleasant and cordial, which, combined 
with his sterling worth, makes him one of 
the popular citizens of his native county. 



F)ROFESSOR MARVIN QUACKEN- 
I BUSH, of Dundee, Illinois, is the 
efficient superintendent of public schools of 
Kane county, which position he has held 
since 1886. He is regarded as one of the 
best educators in the state, and as superin- 
tendent has but few equals. He is a native 
of New York, born in the town of Hatwick, 
Otsego county, November 25, 1842. His 
father, Abram Quackenbush, was also born 
in Otsego county in 1801, while his grand- 
father, James Quackenbush, was likewise a 
native of that state. The family were origi- 



nally from Holland and settled in New York 
in the seventeenth century. Two brothers 
came from Holland about that time, one 
locating in Fort Orange, later called Alba- 
ny, and the other in New York City. The 
branch of the family from which the Pro- 
fessor descended was that of the Albany 
brother. The name was originally spelled 
Quackenbos. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
James Quackenbush, was a soldier in the 
war of 1812, in which he held a commission. 
He settled in Otsego county, engaged in 
agriculture pursuits and there reared his 
family. Abrarn Quackenbush grew to man- 
hood in that county, and in 1826 married 
Miss Delaney Wolf, also a native of New 
York, whose father was one of the early set- 
tlers of the Empire state and served in one 
of the old Indian wars. They were the 
parents of six children, as follows: Cath- 
erine, now the wife of Bradley Foss, of 
Laporte City, Iowa; Edward, a well edu- 
cated man and a professional teacher for 
some years, and also a farmer, now living 
retired at Laporte City, Iowa; Maria, de- 
ceased; Adelia, now the wife of Rev. R. 
H. Wilkinson, a minister of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, now residing in Evanston, 
Illinois; Amelia, now the wife of Louis 
Dutton, of Chicago; and Marvin. 

Abram Quackenbush was a farmer in 
Otsego county, New York, and there all his 
children were born. Desiring to give them 
better opportunities for advancemeut in life 
he determined to come west, and in 1850 
they moved to Illinois, locating in Kane 
county, near the city of St. Charles, where 
he purchased a farm and engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. While yet a young man 
he learned the blacksmith trade, which oc- 
cupation he followed in his native state in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



37 



connection with farming. After residing in 
Kane county for some years he moved to 
Laporte City, Iowa, where he spent the re- 
maining years of his life, dying at the resi- 
dence of his daughter, in 1885, at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-four years. His wife 
preceded him to their heavenly home three 
years previously and both were laid to rest 
in I he Laporte City cemetery, where a sub- 
stantial monument marks their last resting 
place. 

The subject of this sketch came to Kane 
county with his parents a lad of seven years, 
here grew to manhood and received his ed- 
ucation in the common schools and in Jen- 
nings Seminary at Aurora, supplemented by 
a course at Bryant & Stratton's Commer- 
cial College, Chicago. The war for the 
Union was now in progress and our subject 
felt it his duty to enlist, and accordingly 
offered his service as a member of the Thir- 
teenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, but was 
rejected at the examination on account of a 
severely injured foot. His desire, however, 
to assist in putting down the Rebellion was 
not cooled by his rejection, and in Novem- 
ber, 1864, after raising a company of forty 
men, he joined the One Hundred and Fifty- 
third Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry 
and went to the front. He was assigned to 
the quartermaster's department, and served 
in that connection until July 21, 1865, when 
he was discharged for disability and re- 
turned to his home. 

Previous to entering the service of his 
country Mr. Quackenbush had taught three 
terms in the public schools, and after his 
return resumed teaching, first in country 
schools and later in charge of the St. 
Charles school on the east side, where he 
remained six years. He then taught one 
year at Geneva, after which he taught 



eleven years in Dundee. While in charge 
of the school at that place he received the 
nomination of superintendent of public 
schools of Kane county, to which position 
he was elected. He has been twice re- 
elected, both times without opposition. 
This certainly shows the popularity of the 
man and his efficiency as superintendent. 

Professor Quackenbush was married at 
Clintonville, Illinois, in August, 1870, to 
Miss Eleanor Boynton, a native of Dun- 
dee, Illinois, and a daughter of Nathan and 
Margaret (McClure) Boynton, who were 
pioneer settlers of Dundee. By this union 
there is one son, Edward, a graduate of 
Hobart College, Geneva, New York, now 
taking a law course at Elgin, Illinois. The 
grandfather of Mrs. Quackenbush, General 
McClure, was a soldier in the war of 1812, 
and died in Elgin about 1850. His son-in- 
law, Captain Jamison, was the first com- 
mander of old Fort Dearborn, and he and 
his wife were the first white couple married 
in Kane county. 

Politically Professor Quackenbush is a 
Republican, and supports the men and 
measures of that party in all general elec- 
tions, but in local elections casts his ballot 
for the best men, regardless of politics. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic 
order, of the blue lodge at Dundee, Fox 
River chapter of Geneva, and of Bethel 
commandery at Elgin. He has served as 
master of the blue lodge and high priest of 
the commandery, and has represented his 
lodge in the grand lodge of the state and his 
commandery in the grand body of that or- 
der. He is also a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. Religiously he and 
his wife are members of the Congregation- 
alist church, in which they both take an 
active interest. For almost fifty years he 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



has been identified with the interests of 
Kane county, especially in educational af- 
fairs. No man is better known in the coun- 
ty, and not one has more warm friends. 



MAJOR B. T. HUNT. More than six- 
ty-one years have passed since this 
gentleman arrived in Kane county, and he 
is justly numbered among her honored pio- 
neers and leading citizens. He has been 
prominently identified with her business in- 
terests, but is now living retired. His is 
an honorable record of a conscientious man, 
who by his upright life has won the confi- 
dence of all with whom he has come in 
contact. 

Major Hunt was born October 19, 1812, 
in Abington, Plymouth county, Massachu- 
setts, of which county, his father, Thomas 
Hunt, Jr., was also a native. There the 
grandfather, Thomas Hunt, Sr. , reared his 
family and lived for many years. Our sub- 
ject's mother, who bore the maiden name 
of Susannah Pool, was also born in the old 
Bay state. The father was a merchant, 
farmer and tanner, and was one of the first 
to extensively engage in the manufacture of 
shoes in New England: He was one of 
the representative and successful business 
men of the state. 

The subject of this sketch is the only 
one of the family now living. In his native 
place he grew to manhood and obtained a 
good common-school education, which has 
well fitted him for the practical duties of 
business life. During his youth he assisted 
his father in the tanning and manufacturing 
business, as well as in the store, and thus 
obtained a good practical knowledge of busi- 
ness affairs, which has been of great value 
to him in later years. After the father be- 



came too old to have active charge of the 
business, the older brother, Joseph, and 
Thomas assumed control and built up the 
large shoe factory in that section, employ- 
ing many men. 

In 1836, during his early manhood, 
Major Hunt came west, locating in St. 
Charles on the loth of September. Through 
a friend he purchased a half interest in two 
hundred acres of land east of the Fox river 
the original town site the other owners 
being Reed Persons and Ira Minard. These 
three gentlemen engaged in merchandise 
there through the summer of 1836, but in 
the fall the Major returned to Massachu- 
setts, locating permanently here the follow- 
ing spring. They continued in mercantile 
pursuits together for a couple of years, and 
then our subject sold his interest and started 
in business on his own account. Selling 
his general store in 1850, he built a tannery, 
which he successfully operated until 1861, 
when his plant was destroyed by fire. Sub- 
sequently he embarked in the hardware busi- 
ness, in which he was interested until 1890, 
and also erected, at St. Charles, the first 
paper mill in the northwest, beginning the 
business on a small scale, with Mr. Butler, 
but gradually it developed into a large con- 
cern. Subsequently he built a new mill on 
the west side of the river, put in modern 
machinery, and did an extensive business for 
many years. In 1850 he leased the factory 
to Butler & Hunt, who continued its opera- 
tion. The Major has been instrumental in 
establishing a number of enterprises that 
have not only advanced his own prosperity 
but have been extremely beneficial to the 
city. 

At St. Charles, October 12, 1842, Major 
Hunt was united in marriage with Miss Har- 
riet H. Lathrop, who was born in New York 




MAJOR B. T. HUNT. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and reared near Auburn, Cayuga county, that 
state. Her father, Simon Lathrop, settled 
in St. Charles as early as 1841. He had 
been a merchant previous to his removal to 
the west. He had three daughters. They 
became the parents of four children, of whom 
Charles, the eldest, died when young. (2) 
Frank Bradley is married and has four chil- 
dren, one son and three daughters. In 1887 
he removed to Iowa, and for ten years en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits in that state. 
In October, 1 897, he and his family returned 
to St. Charles, where they are now living. 
With his son, Frank C., he is engaged 
in the hardware business in St. Charles. 
(3) Clarence married and located in St. 
Charles, whence he removed to Michigan, 
and later was engaged in business for about 
three years in Chicago. He then returned 
to St. Charles, where he died in the summer 
of 1897. (4) Wilbur C. obtained an excel- 
lent education and adopted the legal profes- 
sion, which he followed in St. Charles for 
some years. He was a man of superior busi- 
ness ability and had the confidence and es- 
teem of all. He died suddenly in the sum- 
mer of 1897, leaving a wife and two sons, 
besides his parents and many friends to 
mourn his loss. 

Politically, Major Hunt is a Jacksonian 
Democrat, and has ever been a stalwart 
supporter of the principles of that party, but 
has never cared for official honors, though 
he served for a number of years on the board 
of trustees of the village. He served as the 
first treasurer of Kane county; the receipts 
for the first year was about seventy-five 
cents. In those days the sheriff collected 
all taxes, and the treasurer served only in a 
nominal capacity. During his younger years 
he also served as major of the county mili- 
tia. His estimable wife is a member of the 



Baptist church. Major Hunt has witnessed 
almost the entire growth and development 
of Kane county, and in the upbuilding and 
prosperity of St. Charles he has been an im- 
portant factor, giving his aid to all objects 
which he believed calculated to prove of 
public benefit. He is widely and favorable 
known throughout this section of the state, 
and those who know him best are numbered 
among his warmest friends. 



THOMAS W. DUNCAN. The expres- 
sion ' ' the dignity of labor " is exemplified 
in the life record of this gentleman, who 
without reserve attributes his success to 
earnest work. He is a man of strong force 
of character, purposeful and energetic, and 
his keen discrimination and sound judg- 
ment are shown in his capable management 
of what is one of the leading industrial 
concerns of the state the Illinois Watch 
Case Factory. No special advantages gave 
him a good start in life; he worked his way 
upward by energy, perseverance and dili- 
gence and the prosperity which is now his 
is the fitting reward of his own honorable 
efforts. 

A native of Lindsay, Canada, Thomas 
Wellington Duncan was born December 6, 
1858, and is a son of James and Mary 
(Hawkins) Duncan. His paternal grand- 
father was Thomas Duncan, a native of 
Belfast, Ireland, which city was also the 
birthplace of James Duncan, who left his 
native land in 1837 and immigrated to 
Lindsay, Canada. He was by trade a car- 
riagemaker and followed that occupation 
until his retirement from business life about 
fifteen years ago. He is still living in Lind- 
say, a respected and valued citizen of that 
community. His wife was a daughter of 



42 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Thomas and Jane Hawkins and was born 
in Edinburg, Scotland, where her parents 
spent their entire lives. Mr. and Mrs. 
Duncan are members of the Episcopal 
church. Their family numbered six chil- 
dren Thomas, Jane, Margaret, John, James 
and William, of whom the first and last are 
still living, William being a resident of St. 
Louis, Missouri. 

In the city of his birth Mr. Duncan, of 
this review, acquired his education and in 
Toronto, Canada, he learned the watch- 
maker's trade. In 1881 he removed to 
Chicago, and in 1887 became a member of 
the firm of M. C. Eppenstein & Company, 
wholesale jewelers of that city. In 1888 
the Illinois Watch Case Company was in- 
corporated and began the manufacture of 
watch cases on Clinton street. On the 1st 
of May, 1890, the factory was removed from 
Chicago to Elgin, where an extensive busi- 
ness is now carried on in the manufacture 
of gold and silver watch cases. The com- 
pany is capitalized for two hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars and their output is 
about five hundred thousand watch cases, 
which are sold in all parts of this country 
and shipped extensively abroad, even to 
Switzerland, the country famous for its 
watches. Their reputation for the excel- 
lence of their goods as well as the business 
reliability of the house extends throughout 
the country and has secured them an ex- 
tensive patronage which yields to them a 
handsome financial return. In 1895 they 
added a new department to their business 
the manufacture of bicycles, and invested 
one hundred thousand dollars in this 
enterprise. Their special wheels are the 
Elgin King and the -Elgin (Jueen, which find 
a ready sale on the market by reason of 
their durability, their lightness, the ease 



with which they are manipulated and the 
other strong points of the first-class wheel. 
They manufactured the celebrated ten thou- 
sand dollar cycle of the Chicago Cycle ex- 
hibition in 1896. It was one of the " King " 
cycles and won the prize on the exhibition. 
It has been sent to Europe where it will be 
placed on exhibition first at a cycle show 
in Belfast, Ireland, and then in other cities 
of Great Britain, after which it will be ex- 
hibited on the continent. One hundred 
operatives are employed in the manufact- 
ure of the wheels and employment is fur- 
nished to four hundred hands in the watch- 
case department. The officers of the 
company are Thomas W. Duncan, presi- 
dent and treasurer; M. Abraham, secretary; 
and T. W. Duncan, M. C. Eppenstein and 
S. C. Eppenstein, directors. 

Mr. Duncan is a supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party, and neglects 
no duty of citizenship, but seeks no political 
office. However, he is a very public-spirited 
and progressive citizen, and has done much 
for the advancement and improvement of 
the city in which he makes his home. 
Prominent in the Masonic fraternity, he 
holds membership in Garden City lodge, No. 
141, A. F. & A. M. ; York chapter, R. A. M. ; 
Apollo commandery, . K. T. , and the 
Oriental consistory, S. P. R. S. , all of 
Chicago. His name is synonymous with 
honorable business dealing, and in all circles 
Mr. Duncan commands the respect and 
esteem of those whom he has met. 



FRANKLIN S. BOSWORTH. Success 
is determined by one's ability to recog- 
nize opportunity, and to pursue this with a 
resolute and unflagging energy. It results 
from continued labor, and the man who thus 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



43 



accomplishes his purpose usually becomes 
an important factor in the business circles 
of the community with which he is connect- 
ed. Mr. Bosworth, through such means, 
has attained a leading place among the rep- 
resentative men of Elgin, and his well-spent 
and honorable life commands the respect of 
all who know him. 

Mr. Bosworth is a native of Boston, 
Erie county, New York, and a son of Ben- 
jamin F. and Almira (Smith) Bosworth. 
His father was born in Greenfield, New 
York, and was a son of Alfred Bosworth, 
who was born in Bristol, Rhode Island, of 
English parentage. The latter came to the 
West in the fall of 1839, taking up his resi- 
dence in Dundee, Illinois, where he died in 
June, 1861. In his early life he followed 
the hatter's trade, but in his later years en- 
gaged in farming. He married Olive Child, 
a native of the Empire state, and they be- 
came parents of six children: Benjamin F., 
Oliver C., Increase C. , Lucinda C., Mary 
C. , wife of Harry Weed; Lucinda, wife of' 
Alfred Ed\yards; and Abbie M., wife of Ben- 
jamin Simonds. All of this family are now 
deceased. 

Dr. Benjamin F. Bosworth, father of 
our subject, studied medicine in early life, 
and practiced his profession until his re- 
moval to Illinois. He located in Chicago in 
1856. and engaged " in merchandising in that 
place until his removal to McHenry, Illi- 
nois, where he conducted a mercantile estab- 
lishment until his death, in September, 1843. 
In politics he was a Whig. In his early 
manhood he was graduated at Union Col- 
lege, New York, then a noted institution of 
learning, and while practicing medicine was 
very successful. His wife, a daughter of 
Amos Smith, was also a native of New York. 
She was a member of the Methodist Episco- 



pal church, and died in New York about 

834- 

Franklin S. Bosworth, their only child, 
was born December 17, 1832, and acquired 
his education in the common schools. He 
began merchandising in 1852, in connection 
with I. C. Bosworth, at Dundee, Illinois, 
where he carried on business until June, 
1871, when he removed to Elgin. Here he 
purchased an interest in a hardware store 
on the East Side, which he successfully con- 
ducted until September, 1883, when he sold 
to Metcalf & Reed. In 1888 he purchased 
an interest in a lumber yard on the West 
Side and soon afterward extended his field 
of operations by dealing in coal. For three 
years he was associated in business with 
Lewis Eaton, but on the expiration of that 
period purchased his partner's interest, and 
was alone until 1896, when he admitted to 
a partnership his son, Frank H. Bosworth. 
The business is now conducted under the 
name of F. S. Bosworth & Son and they 
carry all kinds of lumber and hard and soft 
coal, and have built up a very extensive, 
profitable and satisfactory trade. 

On the 4th of January, 1859, at Dun- 
dee, Illinois, was celebrated the marriage of 
Mr. Bosworth and Miss Sarah E. Hunt, a 
daughter of Ward E. and Mary Hunt, her 
father a native of Vermont. Four children 
were born of this union, of whom the eldest, 
Reuben H., is now deceased. Edward is 
professor of Greek and also occupies the 
chair of theology in Oberlin College of 
Ohio. After completing his preliminary ed- 
ucation in the common schools, he was for 
two years a student in Oberlin College, and 
then matriculated in Yale College, where he 
was graduated with honors. He is a young 
man of splendid mental attainments and ex- 
ceptionally brilliant prospects. He married 



44 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Miss Bertha McClure, of Elgin. Mary is 
now the wife of Walter F. Skeele, a resi- 
dent of Los Angeles, California. Frank H. 
is with his father in business. 

The family are members of the Congre- 
gational church, and in politics Mr. Bosworth 
and his sons are Republicans. He has been 
honored with several local offices, was elect- 
ed a member of the city council in 1879, 
and in 1880 was elected mayor of Elgin, 
filling that office for two consecutive terms. 
His administration was progressive, and the 
city's interests were materially promoted 
through his efforts. He manifests a deep 
interest in the welfare of Elgin, and his in- 
fluence and support are given to all meas- 
ures beneficial to the municipality. Loyal to 
all public duties, honorable in all business 
relations, faithful to all the obligations of 
social life, he stands as one of the leading, 
men of Kane county. 



JOHN W. SEYMOUR, whose residence 
in Illinois covers more than half a cen- 
tury, and whose home has been maintained 
in Elgin for twenty-five years, belongs to 
that heroic pioneer band who were the ad- 
vance guard of civilization in the northern 
section of the state, and who, since that 
time, have been prominent in support of all 
interests calculated to promote the general 
welfare. A native of Yates county, New 
York, he was born March 3, 1833, ar) d ' s 
descended from one of three brothers who 
emigrated from England and took up their 
residence in the Empire state prior to the 
war of the devolution. Jesse Seymour, 
the grandfather of our subject, served his 
country in the war of 1812, and his father, 
Ebenezer Seymour, was one of those who 



aided the heroes who fought for the inde- 
pendence of the colonies by supplying the 
army with cattle and other necessaries. 

John Seymour, the father of our sub- 
ject, was born in Putnam county, New 
York, December 2, 1784, while his wife, 
Elizabeth Seymour, was a native of Yates 
county, that state, .born December i , 1 794. 
In the spring of 1842 they emigrated to 
Illinois, locating at Miller's Grove, in the 
town of Barrington, Cook county. They 
were accompanied by their ten children, all 
of whom located in this state. The father 
died August 27, 1876, at the home of his 
son, John W., in Elgin, and the mother 
passed away on the old homestead in Cook 
county, September 28, 1881. He was a 
stanch Republican in politics and in his 
early life was a member of the Baptist 
.qhurch, but afterwards joined the Methodist 
church with his wife. Of the children, five 
are yet living: Harvey, of Elgin; Mrs. H. 
M. Campbell, of Edgewood, Illinois; Mrs. J. 
M. Miller, of Elgin; Joseph B., of Aurora, 
and John W. , our subject. 

The last named came to Illinois with his 
parents when nine years of age and was 
reared in their home. Later his home be- 
came theirs, and upon their death by inher- 
itance and purchase he became the owner of 
the old farm, comprising three hundred and 
fifty acres of valuable land. He was mar- 
ried December 31, 1857, to Miss Emily L. 
Wood, of Volo, Lake county, Illinois, a 
native of Gainesville, Wyoming county, 
New York, born July i, 1837. With her 
parents, George L. and Phosbe (Potter) 
Wood, she came to Volo Lake, in 1844, 
and continued a resident of this state until 
called to the home beyond. By her mar- 
riage she had two children, William H., 
born March 3, 1859, and Kleber A. , who 



Of 







JOHN W. SEYMOUR. 




7 



MRS. J. W. SEYMOUR. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



49 



was born July 6, 1865, and died August 15, 
1888. 

In 1868 Mr. Seymour removed with his 
family to Barrington Station, Cook county, 
where he was engaged in merchandising in 
connection with A. K. Townsend, who was 
also assistant postmaster. In 1873 he took 
up his residence in Elgin, and has since 
been identified with the interests of that 
city. He has done much to promote its 
commercial prosperity through his con- 
nection with various enterprises. In the 
summer of 1882 he went abroad, accom- 
panied by his wife, making the journey both 
a business and pleasure trip. After visiting 
the principal cities and points of interest in 
Scotland, England and France, he pur- 
chased and imported fifteen head of fine 
Percheron horses, and has since been en- 
gaged in the breeding of that stock in com- 
pany with his son, William H. In 1892 
they located what is known as the Concho 
Valley stock ranch, four miles north of San 
Angelo, Texas. Their stock has gained a 
wide reputation in the horse markets of the 
country, and their enterprise has been at- 
tended with most gratifying success. The 
ranch is under the personal supervision of 
the sen, who married Jennie E. Hendrick- 
son, daughter of Norman G. and Emily 
(Townsend) Hendrickson, by whom he has 
one son, Claude H. William H. Seymour 
is also engaged in dealing in coal, wood, 
cement, etc., in Elgin, as a member of the 
firm of Adams & Seymour. 

In connection with his other business in- 
terests, John W. Seymour aided in the 
organization of the Elgin National Bank in 
the spring of 1892, and is a member of its 
directorate. From the beginning the institu- 
tion has been a paying investment, and is re- 
garded as one of the most reliable banking 



concerns of the county. Mr. Seymour is a 
man of sound judgment, keen discernment 
and excellent executive ability, entirely 
trustworthy, and carries forward to success- 
ful completion whatever he undertakes. 
His success is well merited, being the legiti- 
mate outcome of his well-directed efforts. 

In his political views he is a stalwart 
Republican, and he served as school trustee 
in the town of Barrington. He is a member 
of the First Methodist Episcopal church, of 
which body Mrs. Seymour was also a mem- 
ber, and in which she took a deep and kind- 
ly interest, as well as in all charitable work. 
She was a lady greatly beloved by all who 
knew her, and her death, which occurred 
July 31, 1897, was mourned by many friends. 
In loving remembrance, the following lines 

were dedicated to her: 

*"*- * 

"A precrous one from us-has gone, 

A voice we loved is stilled; 
A place is vacant in our home ' _, 

Which never can he filled. 
God, in His wisdom, has recalled 

The boon His love had given; 
And though the body slumbers here, 

The soul is safe in Heaven." 

Mr. Seymour still makes his home in 
Elgin, and occupies his residence, at No. 
165 North Gifford street, which he erected 
twenty-five years ago. It is still one of the 
best homes of the city, and its hospitable 
doors are ever open for the reception of his 
many friends. 



SILAS BALDWIN, who, after a long 
and useful life in which toil was the 
principal ingredient, is now living retired in 
the village of Hampshire, Illinois, is a 
native of Vermont, born in Dorset, Benning- 
ton county, May 15, 1823. He attended 
the district school at Dorset Hollow, and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



worked on neighboring farms by the month 
until twenty-six years old, when he had 
saved enough by his economy to buy a fifty- 
acre farm, which he cultivated for four 
years. The farm was almost covered with 
maple trees, from which he made maple 
sugar, selling the same through New York. 
The chance for advancement in life was 
thought by him to be very slim, and while, 
like Stephen A. Douglas, he considered 
Vermont a good place to be born in, he 
believed the West a better place in which 
to grow. In 1853 he sold his farm and came 
west; went first to Iowa, but not liking 
that country as well, came to Kane county, 
Illinois, where he bought eighty acres 
on sections 26 and 27, Hampshire town- 
ship, which he improved, and on which he 
resided until March, 1890, when he retired 
from active life, visited one year with rela- 
tives in the east, and in 1891 purchased a 
comfortable home in the village of Hamp- 
shire, where he is now taking life easy. 

Thomas Baldwin, the father of our sub- 
ject, was born April 4, 1774, and died July 
4, 1854. He was the son of Joseph and 
Elizabeth Baldwin, the former dying January 
9, 1808, at the age of seventy-nine years, 
and the latter dying March 13, 1808, at the 
age of sixty years. Thomas Baldwin was a 
blacksmith by trade and an expert tool- 
maker. When regular work was slack, he 
made fine tools for carpenters and others, 
and traveled through the country selling 
them. He was of thrifty Yankee stock, 
and moved from Connecticut to Vermont 
about 1817. A man of strong vitality, full 
of energy and ingenuity, he could not help 
succeeding in life. On the igth of April, 
1817, he married Polly Lamphor, born at 
Mansfield, Connecticut, in 1788, and dying 
in 1862. She was the daughter of John and 



Mary Lamphor, the latter of whom died in 
1813. 

The subject of this sketch was the last 
born in a family of seven children born to 
Thomas and Polly Baldwin. He has two 
brothers living in Vermont and a sister liv- 
ing in California. Silas Baldwin was first 
married in Vermont, near Dorset, to Miriam 
Mumpsted, born January 5, 1819, and who 
died in Hampshire township November 4, 
1878. Of the four children born to them, 
one died in Vermont and two in Hampshire 
township. The living one is Elizabeth Ann, 
who married Burdette C. DeWitt, by whom 
she has six children, as follows: Lillian M. , 
who married J. William Webster, of Cresco, 
Iowa, by whom she has one son, DeWitt; 
Benjamin C. ; Charles; Miriam E. ; Roxie L. 
and Hazel M. 

Mr. Baldwin's second marriage was at 
Tecumseh, Michigan, where he married 
Mrs. Louisa Norton, widow of James T. 
Norton, born at Poultney, Rutland county, 
Vermont, and a daughter of Abijah Will- 
iams, Jr. , a native of Massachusetts, born 
April 28, 1785, and who died at Poultney, 
Vermont, June 27, 1845, at the age of sixty 
years. Abijah Williams, Sr., was the son 
of John Williams, who married Asenath 
Hodge. John Williams was one of three 
brothers who came from England in colonial 
days. Abijah Williams, Jr., married Lu- 
cinda Hill, born in Hartford, Connecticut, 
and a daughter of Thomas and Lydia 
(Davis) Hill, her father being a soldier in 
the Revolutionary war. 

Politically Mr. Baldwin was formerly an 
abolitionist, casting his first presidential 
vote for James G. Birney. On the organi- 
zation of the Republican party, he became 
an advocate of its principles and with that 
party has continued to act until the present 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



time. For twenty-five years he served as 
school director, supervisor three years, and 
has served as road commissioner, school 
trustee and village trustee, and was super- 
intendent of Sunday-schools in an early day 
for a number of years. He is of that self 
reliant New England stock, a well-known 
figure in the village thoroughfares, and 
is highly respected for his just and upright 
life. 

DUNCAN FORBES is one of the repre- 
sentative citizens of Kane county, whose 
birth occurred in "bonnie" Scotland, but 
who for forty years has been a resident of 
this country. He is now enjoying a well- 
earned rest in the village of Dundee, where 
he has resided since 1894. He was born 
August 12, 1834, in Perthshire, Scotland, 
and there grew to manhood. After attend- 
ing the common schoois for a time he was 
apprenticed to learn the cabinetmaker's and 
joiner's trade, serving a four-years' term. 
After completing his trade he worked as a 
journeyman for a time, but, believing the 
new world afforded better opportunities for 
advancement, he came to America in 1858, 
locating first in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, 
where he worked as a journeyman two 
years. In March, 1861, he located in Chi- 
cago and went to work at ship carpentering. 
In July of the same year he commenced 
contracting, and built a house in Barring- 
ton township and one in Dundee. 

Up to this time Mr. Forbes was a single 
man, but on the I2th of December, 1862, 
he was united in marriage, in Dundee town- 
ship, with Miss Jeannette Cochran, a native 
of Scotland, who came to the United States 
when a child of nine years! Her father, 
Malcolm Cochran, was also a native of 
Scotland, who came to Dundee township, 



Kane county, in 1849, where he engaged in 
farming, following that occupation through- 
out life. After their marriage Mr. Forbes 
moved to Chicago and engaged in the fur- 
niture trade for nine years, building up in 
that time a most satisfactory trade. In Oc- 
tober, 1871, he returned to Kane county, 
and located in Dundee township on the old 
Cochran homestead, where he and his 
brother-in-law, John Cochran, engaged in 
agricultural pursuits until 1 894. He further 
improved and developed the place, and had 
one of the best farms in Dundee township. 
For twenty-three years he continued to give 
personal attention to the farm, and then 
rented the place and moved to Dundee, pur- 
chased a lot and built a large and substan- 
tial residence, one of the best in the village, 
and is now living a retired life. 

Mr. Forbes politically is a stanch Re- 
publican, and cast his first presidential bal- 
lot for General U. S. Grant. He has sup- 
ported the nominees of that party from that 
time to the present, casting his last vote for 
William McKinley in 1896. A friend of 
education and the public schools, he served 
some years as a member of the school board. 
He also served as township trustee for some 
fifteen years, but never desired or sought 
public office. Mr. and Mrs. Forbes were 
reared in the Presbyterian faith, but of late 
years have attended and supported the Con- 
gregational church. 

Mr. Forbes has been a resident of Illi- 
nois for thirty-seven years, and Mrs. Forbes 
for forty-nine years. They have witnessed 
much of the growth and development of 
Kane county and northern Illinois, and are 
numbered among the esteemed old settlers. 
He is known in Dundee and Kane county as 
a man of exemplary habits, of tried integ- 
rity and worth, and he and his estimable 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



wife are held in the highest esteem by all 
who know them. Commencing life a poor 
man, with nothing but willing hands and a 
stout heart, with the assistance of his good 
wife he has accumulated a good property, 
and they can well afford to spend the rest 
of their lives in ease and retirement. 

John Cochran, the brother of Mrs. Forbes, 
came with his parents to this country a lad 
of twelve years. He here grew to manhood 
and continued to work upon the farm until 
his death, which occurred July 14, 1894. 
For two years he and his sister conducted 
the home farm, and also for a time were 
partners in the furniture trade. He was a 
man of sterling character, and one of the 
honest yeomen of the county. 



ABEL D. GIFFORD, a retired farmer 
and pioneer of 1837, now resides in a 
beautiful home at No. 254 Villa street, El- 
gin. He is a native of Chenango county, 
New York, born in Sherburne, August 9, 
1818, and is a son of Asa and Dinah (Tal- 
cott) Gifford, natives of Massachusetts, who 
at a very early day settled in Chenango 
county, New York, removing from there to 
Oneida county, where their last days were 
spent, the latter dying in November, 1822, 
at the age of about fifty-seven years, and 
the former in May, 1837, in h' s seventieth 
year. They were the parents of eleven 
children, five sons and six daughters, ten of 
whom grew to manhood and womanhood 
Ruth, Experience, James T. , Peleg, Sarah, 
Susan, Asa, Hezekiah and Harriet. Of 
this number, Peleg died when about a year 
old, and Sarah, died at the age of twenty- 
two. 

All of the children then living came west 
and located in Kane county, in 1835, ex- 



cept Abel D. , who remained at home to 
care for his parents. Both parents were 
members of the Baptist church, of which 
the father was a deacon for many years. 
By trade he was a carpenter, at which oc- 
cupation he spent his early life. Later he 
engaged in merchandising, but the last 
years of his life were spent in agricultural 
pursuits. He was a good reader, a close 
observer, and a very prominent man in his 
community. For one term he served as 
sheriff of his county, was county judge and 
a justice of the peace for some years. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
who was of English descent, died in Massa- 
chusetts in middle life. The maternal 
grandfather Talcott was a judge in Herkimer 
county, New York, and at one time was 
very wealthy, but lost his money and prop- 
erty in unfortunate law-suits. He was about 
seventy-eight years old when he died. 

Abel D. Gifford, of whom we now write, 
was reared upon a farm in Chenango coun- 
ty, New York, and was early in life inured 
to hard labor. His education was received 
in the public schools of his native county, 
supplemented by a few terms in Vernon 
Academy. Soon after the death of his 
father he came to Illinois and located on a 
farm two miles east of the then city limits 
of Elgin, but which now adjoins the city. 
This was six years before the government 
survey. His first purchase was two hundred 
and sixty acres, which he finely improved 
and which yet remains in his possession. 
Since 1889 he has lived in Elgin, his son, 
Charles A., operating the home farm, where 
he is also engaged in dairying, having be- 
tween seventy and eighty cows. During 
the season, his son also operates a thresh- 
ing machine. 

On the 20th of February, 1838, Mr. 




A. D. GIFFORD, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



55 



Gifford was united in marriage with Miss 
Harriet M. Root, a daughter of Dr. An- 
son Root, a pioneer physician of Kane 
county. By this union there was one child, 
Frank A., who died at the age of nine 
months. Eighteen days later the little 
one's mother gave up her life. Religiously 
she was a Baptist. The second union of 
Mr. Gifford was on the 9th of August, 1855, 
when he married Miss Julia E. Chappell, 
daughter of Harvey M. and Mary Chappell. 
For a number of years prior to her mar- 
riage Mrs. Gifford taug"ht school in Kane 
county. By this union there were two chil- 
dren, Carrie L. and Charles A. The for- 
mer married Charles Holden, and they have 
two children. Hazel H. and Gifford Merrell. 
Charles A. married Miss Florence D. Stick- 
ney, who died in March, 1897. They had 
four children, Frank A., Stanley, Walter 
and Florence. 

The second wife of Mr. Gifford died 
July 10, 1893, in her sixty-ninth year. Re- 
ligiously she was also a Baptist, and in the 
work of the church took a deep and com- 
mendable interest. For his third wife Mr. 
Gifford chose Mrs. Clara F. Whitten, widow 
of Dr. Parker Whitten and daughter of 
David and Harriet (Cain) Flood. Their 
wedding ceremony took place December 15, 
1896. For some years the present Mrs. 
Gifford was a successful teacher- in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, and Atlanta, Georgia, where 
she gave instruction to several hundred col- 
ored children. By her first marriage Mrs. 
Gifford had two children^-Parker Merritt, 
who was killed by a kick from a horse when 
one year old; and Manfred Pitt, who is 
studying medicine at the Vermont State 
University. 

Mrs. Gifford's parents were natives of 
the state of Maine. In early life her father 



was a farmer, and later a trader. He died 
in Lewiston, Maine, in 1865, at the age of 
forty-five years. His widow is still living, 
and makes her home at Woodsville, New 
Hampshire, The father was a consistent 
member of the Baptist church, while the 
mother holds membership with the Chris- 
tian church. The paternal grandfather of 
Mrs. Gifford, John Flood, was a native of 
Maine, of supposedly Irish descent. In the 
war of 1812 he served his country faithfully 
and well. Her maternal grandfather, Moses 
Cain, was also for a -time jn the military 
service. By occupation he was a farmer 
and a minister of the gospel. ''''^y 

The Gifford family are well known in 
Kane county. James T. Gifford, a brother 
of our subject, laid out the city of Elgin, 
naming it after the title of a piece of music 
that he fancied. As stated, the entire fam- 
ily, save the parents, came to Kane county 
and settled in the vicinity of Elgin in pioneer 
days. All were highly honored citizens, 
whose names and memories are cherished 
by their many friends and acquaintances. 

Abel D. Gifford has now been a resident 
of this vicinity for more than sixty years, 
and has been identified with its growth and 
prosperity. The country was then wild in- 
deed, and the thriving cities now in northern 
Illinois existed but in name. Chicago then 
gave no evidence of its present prosperity 
and magnificent proportions. 

Since his thirteenth year Mr. Gifford has 
been a member of the Baptist church, and 
and is the only surviving charter member of 
the First Baptist church of Elgin, which was 
organized in 1838, and of which he has 
been trustee since its organization and 
deacon for about fifty years. In the service 
of his Master he has always taken special 
delight, and has done much to advance the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cause in the place which has so long been 
his home. Mrs. Gifford is also a member 
of the Baptist church. 

Politically, Mr. Gifford is a Republican, 
with which party he has been connected 
since its organization. A strong believer in 
liberty, he naturally allied himself with the 
Republicans and labored for the success of 
the party. In the discharge of his duties 
as a citizen he has served in several local 
offices, being road commissioner of Hanover 
township for several years and also town- 
ship assessor. On coming to Elgin he built 
his present beautiful home in 1889. On 
the premises he makes his own gas for light- 
ing purposes, although he uses in connec- 
tion electricity. The house is heated by 
steam and is handsomely furnished and 
most home like. 

In all his life Mr. Gifford never drank 
intoxicating liquors of any kind, never 
chewed tobacco, and never smoked but a 
few times. His life has been indeed a tem- 
perate one, and no man stands higher in 
the estimation of the people. All esteem 
him for his many excellent qualities of head 
and heart. 

A DIN MANN, a well-known surveyor, 
civil engineer and prominent citizen 
of Elgin, residing at No. 112 Porter street, 
was born in Oxford, New Hampshire, Oc- 
tober 14, 1816, and his parents, Aaron and 
Sarah (Ingraham) Mann, were natives of 
the same state. Of their seven children, 
six sons and one daughter, only two are 
now living, Adin, and Monroe, a resident of 
Montana. 

The father, a farmer by occupation, 
came to Illinois in 1838 with his family and 
settled on a "claim" in the western part 
of Elgin township, Kane county, that our 



subject had taken up the year previous. 
Overwork and change of climate broke 
down his health the first season and he 
turned over the active operations of the 
farm to the boys, and cultivated only his 
garden which he always kept in prime con- 
dition till his death in 1852, when sev- 
enty-seven years of age. His faithful wife 
survived him only three weeks, dying at the 
age of sixty-three. Both were earnest 
members of the Congregational church. 
He served as captain of a militia company 
in the war of 1812. 

John Mann, our subject's paternal grand- 
father, was of English and Welsh descent, 
and born in Hebron, Connecticut, and was 
the youngest of twelve sons. His father 
was joint proprietor of a township on the 
Connecticut river, in the northerly part of 
New Hampshire, having surveyed the lands 
under the Crown and obtaining title to one- 
half of the territory surveyed. 

These lands he offered to each of his 
several sons as they became of age, if they 
would go up and settle on it, but they all 
refused till it came to John, the youngest. 
He said "Yes, I will go," and with his 
young bride, a little woman of one hundred 
pounds weight, he started for the northern 
wilds, to find his promised land, and pur- 
sued his journey to the end of all roads or 
means of conveyance. Here he engaged a 
man with a "dugout" to take his little 
worldly effects and row up the river, while 
he hired a horse from a frontier settler, and 
mounting, took his little wife on the "pil- 
lion " behind him, and pushed on through 
the tangled forest sixty miles further, and 
dismounting they stood there alone on an 
October in 1765 in the solitude of the wil- 
derness. The man who had navigated the 
" dugout" took back the horse to its owner. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



57 



They found and took possession of a log 
shanty that some daring adventurer had 
built and abandoned after felling two acres 
of the surrounding dense timber. Thus 
John Mann, with a small stock of provi- 
sions, an axe, jack-knife and drawing-knife, 
and the wife with a bed, a six-quart iron 
kettle and a three-pint tin dish, started out, 
at the coming on of winter, to commence 
the battle of life and carve out for them- 
selves a home and fortune in the wilderness, 
and they succeeded. Being a cooper, with 
his axe, jack-knife and drawing-knife, he 
soon made a pail and tub for the wife, and 
learning that a settlement some distance up 
the river had raised some corn and impro- 
vised a crude mill to grind it into meal, he 
made a dozen more pails in the same crude 
way, and a hand-sled, going fifteen miles 
over into Vermont to his nearest neighbor 
to borrow a small augur for the purpose, 
and, when the river froze over, took his 
wares on the sled and hauled them up to 
the Haverhill settlement, traded them for 
corn, which he brought back in the shape 
of meal. In the spring he burned off the 
brush and limbs on the two acres of fallen 
timber, and planted corn among the logs 
and raised one hundred and fifty bushels. 
Thereafter his granary was never empty, 
and he became known the country round as 
the Joseph of Egypt, where all who needed 
could find a supply of grain. His little wife 
presented him with twelve sons and three 
daughters, all who lived to marry but one, 
and, dying at the age of eighty-four, John 
Mann left one hundred and fifty-six living 
descendants. 

Our subject's maternal grandfather was 
also of English descent and spent his entire 
life in the old Granite state, where he en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. His daugh- 



ter, Mrs. Mann, was one of the heirs to 
the lands on which the city of Sheffield, 
England, the great steel manufacturing cen- 
tre is builded, by will to the children of the 
fourth generation of the testator, of whom 
Mrs. Mann was one, but the loss of certain 
papers has hitherto defeated a successful 
prosecution of the claim. On the old home- 
stead in New Hampshire, which was a part 
of the John Mann tract, where he first 
opened his eyes to the light of day, Adin 
Mann remained till he attained his majority, 
during the last three years of which he 
worked on the farm in summer, taught 
school in the winter and attended the Kim- 
ble Union Academy at the spring and fall 
terms, where he acquired a good .practical 
education. In the summer of 1837 he came 
to Illinois and " took up a claim " on the as 
yet unsurveyed government lands in the 
west part of Elgin township, anticipating a 
future home for his -father's 'family, and had 
some land broken up. Later in the season 
he returned to the old home, and in the 
spring of 1838 the whole family with two or 
three others, in all thirty persons, in wagons, 
started for Illinois, where they safely landed 
the latter part of June, after a tedious jour- 
ney of nearly six weeks. A frame house 
was soon erected and the work of improve- 
ment began in earnest; shade trees and 
orchards were soon planted and in a short 
time the wild prairie assumed the aspect of 
a thrifty New England home. Later, when 
the public lands came into market, the 
claim was divided between the three older 
sons, one part becoming the property of our 
subject, who devoted the summer seasons 
to the farm and taught school in Elgin in 
the winter, being among the first teachers 
in this section of the state. In 1841 Mr. 
Mann returned to the old eastern home for 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



" the girl he left behind him," and on the 
3Oth of May married Miss Lydia P. Wright, 
daughter of Wincol F. and Mary (Worces- 
ter) Wright, and to them were born six sons 
and two daughters Henry P., Eugene, 
Frank W., George W., Howard, Mary W., 
Hattie M. and Charles E. In 1843 Mr. 
Mann was elected justice of the peace and 
county surveyor, and moved from the farm 
into Elgin, but at the end of two years, on 
account of ill health, resigned the office of 
justice of the peace and returned to the 
farm, retaining, however, the surveyor's 
office, to which position in after years he 
was several times elected. He was notary 
public for many years, and also township 
assessor. He also served as county treas- 
urer in 1860 and 1861, when, on the break- 
ing out of the war, the currency which he 
received at par depreciated to less than fifty 
cents on the dollar, and he was one of forty- 
two county treasurers who went under in 
the crash. The question might, perhaps, 
have been properly raised whether he and 
his sureties should be the sufferers, or 
whether the community at large, from whom 
he had received the currency in good faith, 
should have made good the losses. He 
turned over every species of property he 
possessed to make good the losses, except a 
cow, two pigs and a few bushels of wheat, 
leaving still a deficiency of $5,000, which 
his bail promptly paid. He then, broken 
in spirit, but patriotic to the core, procured 
authority from the governor to raise a com- 
pany for the army, and in six days had one 
hundred brave boys enlisted, mustered into 
the United States service, and with his 
company and third son hastened to the ren- 
dezvous at Camp Butler, where he became 
captain of Company B, One Hundred and 
Twenty-fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteer 



Infantry. The two older sons had entered 
the service the year previous, and the fourth 
followed as soon as he could carry a gun. 
The father and four sons put in fourteen 
years of hard service, always at the front, 
and were one hundred and twenty-five days 
under battle and siege, and, what is quite 
remarkable, neither received a wound. He 
participated in quite a number of important 
battles, including the engagements at Port 
Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills, 
which General Grant declared to be the most 
important battle of the war, also at Yazoo 
and Bentonville, and in an exposed position 
and under fire through the siege of Vicks- 
burg, where he had command of the left 
wing of the charging party at the blowing 
up of Fort Hill. Later he was appointed 
chief engineer of the Vicksburg district, 
which position he filled with marked ability 
and efficiency till mustered out of the serv- 
ice, August 14, 1865, with the rank of lieu- 
tenant-colonel. When Lee surrendered, the 
headquarters of the department of the Mis- 
sissippi was moved from Vicksburg to Jack- 
son, with thirty thousand troops at that and 
other points in the interior. Mr. Mann was 
ordered to examine and report the condition 
of railroad communication between the two 
points, and found the whole line from the 
Big Black river to Jackson (thirty-five miles) 
in a condition of utter wreck, over one hun- 
dred bridges and culverts burned out, four- 
teen miles of the rails torn up and bent, ties 
burned and other material destroyed or car- 
ried away. 

This he was ordered to rebuild at once, 
to furnish the timber, ties and other needed 
material, straighten the bent and twisted 
rails and put the road in running order, and 
was given seven regiments of colored troops 
to do it with, and in the meantime to fur- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



59 



nish transportation and forward all supplies 
for the troops at Jackson and interior until 
the railroad could be rebuilt, and he was 
obliged to put on a transportation train of 
nine hundred mules for that purpose. 

There being no white troops in reach 
from which to obtain the necessary skilled 
labor, he was compelled to pick up and hire 
old railroad men and mechanics wherever 
he could find them, and had one hundred 
and forty such on his pay roll, a large part 
of whom were returned Confederate sol- 
diers. 

The work was prosecuted vigorously. 
Material procured, timber cut and hewed in 
the forests, fifty miles away, bridges built, 
rails straightened and laid, and engines 
soon on the 'track. During these later 
months our subject had the work of three 
men on his shoulders, yet every branch of 
the business was pushed forward with sys- 
tem and vigor, he often riding forty miles 
on horseback in the night to be present at 
some point where his presence was needed 
in the morning. Thus he closed his mili- 
tary career, with the consciousness of hav- 
ing discharged every duty devolving upon 
him with promptness and efficiency and to 
the entire satisfaction of all his superiors in 
office, and with the warm regard of all who 
served under him, for he always looked after 
the comfort of the common soldier, often 
dismounting while on the march and putting 
a tired soldier boy in his saddle, or taking 
up a half dozen guns and balancing them 
across the saddle in front of him, to relieve 
the weary ones of a part of their burden, 
and looking after the comfort of the sick 
as far as possible. 

He had saved over four thousand dollars 
from his army pay and when discharged 
from the military service went into the lum- 



ber business, and became partner in three 
steam sawmills and a large body of pine 
timber land, his family having removed to 
Vicksburg near the close of the war. The 
business prospect was most excellent, his 
interest being capable of yielding him a 
daily net income of fifty dollars, from which 
he hoped soon to liquidate all his obliga- 
tins in Illinois. But the fates combined to 
crush him again at the end of the war as it 
had done at the beginning, and after a year 
of hard work and struggle, with the life of 
himself and family in constant peril, he gave 
up the contest and with funds barely suffi- 
cient to reach Kane county, he returned to 
his old home in Batavia, broken in health 
and penniless. The bitterness of the South 
against the old Yankee soldiers and the re- 
fusal of the railroads to ship his lumber to 
market, with other causes, compelled him 
to abandon a property worth ten thousand 
dollars. 

After returning to Batavia, Illinois, he 
engaged in map-making for a Philadelphia 
publishing firm, and made county atlases in 
Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York, and a 
state atlas of Kansas and Nebraska, which 
embraced a sectional map of every county 
in those states. He was an expert in this 
work. He filled the position of city engin- 
eer of Oil City for a time, and was assist- 
ant engineer at Topeka, Kansas, for a year 
and a half. With the exception of four 
years in Mississippi and twelve years in Kan- 
sas he has made his home in Kane county 
since 1837, an ^ nas been prominently iden- 
tified with its interests. His life has been 
one of checkered vicissitudes, haying lost 
the bottom dollar six times, yet when over- 
whelmed and buried beneath the avalanche 
of misfortune has heroically kicked off the 
sods and commenced anew the fight, and 



6o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



although in his eighty-second year he is still 
very active and is now acceptably serving as 
city engineer of Elgin and deputy county 
surveyor of Kane county. 

Fraternally, Mr. Mann affiliates with 
Veteran post, No. 49, G. A. R., and, polit- 
ically, has always been identified with the 
Republican party. His life is exemplary in 
many respects, and he has ever supported 
those interests which are calculated to up- 
lift and benefit humanity, while his own 
high moral worth is deserving of the high- 
est commendation. He has been a strictly 
temperate man, never using tobacco or 
liquor in any form, and both he and his 
wife are consistent members of the Congre- 
gational church. On the eightieth anniver- 
sary of his birth, the family and near rela- 
tives held a re-union at his home, it being 
a pleasant surprise to himself and wife. In 
memory of that occasion he penned the fol- 
lowing beautiful poem, being too much sur- 
prised and affected at the time to give ex- 
pression to his thoughts: 

TO THE FRIENDS WHO SO PLEASANTLY 
SURPRISED US ON THE EIGHTI- 
ETH ANNIVERSARY OF 
OUR BIRTHDAY. 

In the early morning still with dewdrops glittering, 
With the mists still curling and the robins twittering, 
While all varied nature, fresh from the couch of night, 
Robed in golden sunbeams, smiled with radiance 
bright. 

In life's morning pathway, moist with the dew of 

youth, 

I met a blushing maiden, as fair and pure as truth; 
She put her hand in mine with confidence and joy, 
We walked along together in bliss without alloy. 

We roamed o'er life's meadows, through many downs 

and ups, 

Breathing balm of roses, plucking the buttercups; 
Hand in hand together along life's devious way, 
Erst with joy or sorrow, we walked the live-long day. 

But mid-day heat grew strong, our shoulders bent 
with care, 



And many blinding griefs and burdens hard to bear; 
Yet in joy or sorrow, hand in hand as ever, 
Through all life's long journey we've walked along 
together. 

Now the day is waning, the evening shades draw nigh, 
The hour is approaching to lay our labors by, 
Yet through twilight walking, hand in hand tagether, 
We still will journey on, nearing the dark river. 

And will the angels come, as we stand together 
By the deep dark waters, and row us safely over 
To the land of beauty to the realms forever blest 
Where no sorrow reaches and weary ones find rest? 

Will our absent loved ones, who've passed away be- 
fore, 

Meet with joyous greeting our landing on their shore? 
Will those we leave behind come to that happy land? 
Shall we meet together, a full, unbroken band? 

God in his mercy grant this, our most earnest prayer: 
Guide us all and keep us, and bring us over there, 
Over there, over there, a blest united band. 
Together over there, one in that happy land. 

A. MANN. 
Elgin, Illinois, October 14, 1896. 



EBEN FOSS, residing at No. 63 1 Doug- 
las avenue, Elgin, is the possessor of a 
handsome property which now enables him 
to spend his years in the pleasurable enjoy- 
ment of his accumulations. The record of 
his life previous to 1885, is that of an active, 
enterprising, methodical and sagacious busi- 
ness man and farmer, who bent his energies 
to the honorable acquirement of a comfort- 
able competence for himself and family. 

Mr. Foss was born in Thornton, New 
Hampshire, June 10, 1822, a son of Eben 
and Mary (Webster) Foss, also natives of 
that state, the former born January 9, 1785, 
the latter April 24, 1793. They were mar- 
ried November 2, 1815, at Thornton. When 
our subject was quite small he lost his 
mother, her death occurring March 24, 
1826, but the father survived her many 
years, dying March 16, 1869. The paternal 
grandfather, who also bore the name of 
Eben Foss, was a native of New Hamp- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



61 



shire, where throughout life he followed the 
occupation of farming and reared a large 
family of children, including John, Eben, 
Langdon, Carter, Jacob, Milton, Ruth, 
Betsy, Mrs. Robinson and Mrs. Durgin. 
The parents of these children were both 
members of the Congregational church. 

The maternal grandfather of our subject 
was a private in the Colonial army during 
the Revolutionary war and late in life re- 
ceived a pension from the government. 
The great-great-grandmother, Mrs. Dustin, 
was at one time taken prisoner by the In- 
dians while they were on the warpath and 
held in captivity for a time. Being notified 
of the approach of the red men, she sent 
word by one of the children to her husband 
who was plowing in the field at the time. 
He came at once to the house, brought 
out his seven children and bidding them to 
run ahead he slowly retreated, keeping the 
Indians back with his gun; he thus brought 
off his little flock in safety. His wife, who 
was unable to escape with him, was dragged 
into captivity. The party who captured 
Mrs. Dustin marched many days through 
the forest, at length reached an island in 
the Merrimac. Several days later, while 
the Indians were asleep, she, with the as- 
sistance of her nurse and a boy, who had 
also been captured, killed ten of the red 
men and returned home with their scalps 
that she might prove to the settlers, beyond 
a doubt, what she had done. 

The mother of our subject had two 
brothers, Betton and Bradley, and perhaps 
others, besides several sisters Mrs. Sargent, 
Mrs. Robinson, Mrs. Chatman, and Harriet, 
who was twice married, her second husband 
being a Mr. Greely, who conducted a hotel 
in Thornton, New Hampshire, for many 
years. 



Eben Foss, of this review, is the fourth 
in order of birth in a family of six children, 
as follows: Betton, born February 10, 
1817, was married in May, 1841, and both 
he and his wife are now deceased, his death 
occurring August 21, 1859. Mary Ann, 
born August 2, 1818, married Charles Cal- 
don, and died in 1882, leaving four children, 
who live in New Hampshire. Hannah Jane, 
born May 11, 1820, was married in Decem- 
ber, 1842, to Oris Hitchcock, and died in 
1891, leaving the following children Pas- 
chal, Charles, Frank, Mary, wife of Charles 
Sharp; Mrs. Hattie Andrews, Mrs. Clara 
Bell Loveless, Mrs. Ella Sharp, and Ellen. 
Eben, our subject. Bradley V., born July 
29, 1824, was married July n, 1852, and 
now lives in Laporte City, Iowa. Harriet 
Webster, born February 8, 1826, was mar- 
ried May 9, 1850, to Daniel Brandon, and 
died in 1887. After the death of the mother 
of these children, the father married Char- 
lotte Elliott, by whom he had one son 
Charles Elliott, who was born May 28, 
1828, and is now living in California. His 
children are Alvah and Louella, who are 
still living; and Ida, who died in 1877, at 
the age of twenty years. 

During his boyhood the subject of this 
sketch attended the district schools for three 
months during the winter season, while the 
remainder of the year was spent in assisting 
with the work of the home farm. When 
sixteen years of age he came with his par- 
ents to Campton township, Kane county, 
where he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of wild land at the government price 
of one dollar and a quarter per acre. He 
continued to work for his father until he at- 
tained his majority, and became thoroughly 
familiar with every department of farm work. 
On starting out in life for himself, he con- 



62 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tinued to follow the pursuit to which he had 
been reared, and became one of the most 
successful farmers and stock- raisers in his 
locality. The land which he purchased 
from the government he continued to oper- 
ate until 1884, and to the original tract 
added until he had one hundred and seventy- 
four acres of valuable land, which he sold 
for nearly sixty-seven dollars per acre. He 
then removed to Elgin, where he has since 
lived retired, enjoying the fruits of his for- 
mer toil. 

In 1847 Mr. Fosswas united in marriage 
to Mrs. Emily C. (Ravlin) Cleveland, who 
died November 18, 1885, at the age of six- 
ty-six years. She was a consistent Chris- 
tian woman, a member of the Baptist church. 
By her first marriage she had one son, still 
living Charles L. Cleveland, of Scranton, 
Greene county, Iowa, who married Weal- 
thy Allen and has two children, Fred and 
Frank. Three children blessed the second 
union, namely: Mary Webster, who died at 
the age of one year; Harriet, widow of J. 
A. Daniels, who died February 12, 1896, in 
California, aged fifty-three years, and left 
one son, John F. , now a student in the 
public schools; and Mary F., wife of J. H. 
Williams, of Elgin, by whom she has five 
children Howard, Clarence, Lloyd, Ruth 
and Grace. 

Mr. Foss cast his first presidential vote 
for Zachary Taylor, but has never taken a 
very active part in politics aside from vot- 
ing. He is a worthy representative of that 
class of citizens who lead quiet, industrious, 
honest and useful lives, and constitute the 
best portion of a community. Wherever 
known he is held in high regard, and as an 
honored pioneer and highly-respected citi- 
zen he is certainly deserving of honorable 
mention in the history of his adopted county. 



I ONATHAN TEFFT, a farmer living two 
J and one-half miles south of Elgin City, 
is numbered among the earliest settlers of 
Kane county, the family emigrating from 
Madison county, New York, and locating in 
Kane county in the fall of 1835. The pa- 
ternal grandfather, Jeremiah Tefft, was 
a native of Rhode Island, married "Rhoda 
Hoxie, of Richmond, Kings county, Colony 
of Rhode Island," as the old marriage cer- 
tificate reads, which is in possession of our 
subject, "October 23, 1768, by Edward 
Perry, J. P." ;After the close of the Revolu- 
tion he moved to Madison county, New 
York, which was then the far western fron- 
tier. There he spent the remainder of his 
life and reared his large family, one of whom, 
Jonathan, was the father of our subject. 

Jonathan Tefft, Sr., was born in Madi- 
son county, New York, where he married 
Elizabeth Collins, born December 8, 1792, 
and daughter of Solomon Collins. By this 
union were fourteen children, six of whom 
are yet living: Amos, living in Nebraska; 
Jonathan, our subject; Thomas W., now 
serving as alderman of the sixth ward in 
Elgin; Louisa, widow of P. C. Gilbert, re- 
siding in Elgin; Emeline, widow of William 
Worden, now residing in Kansas; and Rhoda, 
who married Chauncey B. Halley, and now 
lives in Barrington, Cook county. 

. On coming west, Jonathan Tefft, Sr. , 
settled first on a farm in Cook county, ad- 
joining the present city of Elgin, a part of 
which is now Lord's Park. The year fol- 
lowing he bought a claim, the farm on which 
our subject now resides, lying in section 36, 
Elgin township, and section 31, Hanover 
township, Cook county. The first farm in 
Cook county he sold to his son, Dr. Joseph 
Tefft, the first physician in Elgin. His death 
occurred in Elgin, January 26, 1886, having 




JONATHAN TEFFT. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



almost attained his seventy-sixth year. In 
his political views he was originally a Dem- 
ocrat, later a Republican, a man of great 
strength of character, never sought office, 
but served in many official positions. Jon- 
athan Tefft, Sr. , was one of three commis- 
sioners to lay out and establish a road from 
Elgin to St. Charles on the east side of Fox 
river. 

Jonathan Tefft, our subject, was born in 
the town of Lebanon, Madison county, New 
York, was reared on a farm, and attended 
the district schools until the age of eighteen, 
when the family moved west. He attended 
school one winter after coming to Illinois in 
a log school house two miles south of Elgin. 
His first purchase of land was one hundred 
and ten acres lying northeast of Elgin, and 
in 1850 he purchased one hundred and forty- 
three acres in section 3 1 , range 9, lying 
south of his father's homestead. -On that 
place he resided until March 1, 1865, when 
he moved to the old farm. 

Mr. Tefft was married near Elgin April 
8, 1841, to Miss Delinda West, a native of 
Madison county, New York, and daughter 
of Isaac West, who first married Ruth W'il- 
cox, daughter of Daniel Wilcox. The 
Wests moved from the same neighborhood 
in Madison county, New York, the year fol- 
lowing the emigration of the Tefft family. 
Of the three children of Isaac and Ruth 
West, Mrs. Tefft alone survives. He died 
in 1876 at the age of eighty-two years. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Tefft five children have been 
born, only two of whom are now living, 
Jenny and Frank. 

As a practical farmer, Mr. Tefft is ex- 
celled by few. He has a large dairy farm, 
which consists of two hundred and eighty 
acres, fifty-two acres lying in Kane county 
and the rest in Cook county, and is well im- 



proved in every respect. His father's old 
house is still standing on the farm, but he 
resides in a house erected by himself in 1888, 
which cost nearly five thousand dollars. 
On the place are one hundred head of cat- 
tle, eighty of which are milch cows. He 
has a large cattle barn, thirty-six by one 
hundred and forty-six feet, horse barn forty 
by forty feet, and tool shed thirty-two by 
thirty- six feet. The entire farm is under a 
high state of cultivation, and everything 
about the place shows a thrift of the owner. 

In politics Mr. Tefft ie a Republican, 
with which party he has acted since its or- 
ganization. He has been honored by his 
townsmen with a number of official posi- 
tions. He was made a Master Mason in 
the Elgin lodge, No. 117, in 1854, and was 
one of the charter members of South Elgin 
lodge in 1865. On the surrender of its 
charter he again united with Elgin lodge, 
No. 1 17. He was a member of Fox River 
chapter at St. Charles, and of Bethel com- 
mandery at Elgin. He was formerly a mem- 
ber of the Sycamore commandery at Syca- 
more. At one time he was a member of the 
Board of Trade of Elgin. 

Mr. Tefft is one of the few men yet liv- 
ing who saw almost this entire country in 
its virgin state, and has done as much as 
any other one man to develop its resources 
and make it the garden spot of the west. 
On his arrival here there were but few cab- 
ins on the east side of the river at Elgin and 
but three on the west side. He has hunted 
deer on the present site of the city, and as- 
sisted in breaking the prairie on its present 
site. He remembers when the Indians came 
from the northwest to spear fish in the Fox 
river. Nearly all of his long and useful 
life has been spent in Elgin township, and- 
few men are better known in Kane county. 



66 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



JOHN L. HEALY, a representative mem- 
ber of the bar of Elgin and a native of 
the city, was born August 3, 1861, his par- 
ents being Bernard and Catherine (Laugh- 
lin) Healy. His father was born in Dublin, 
Ireland, and was a son of Joseph Healy, an 
officer in the English army. The latter mar- 
ried Margaret Morgan and both he and his 
wife spent their entire lives in the old world. 
Bernard Healy was the only one of their 
family that ever crossed the Atlantic to 
America. He made the voyage in 1842 and 
soon after took up his residence in Elgin, 
where he embarked in the harness and a 
saddlery business, engaging longer in active 
and uninterrupted business than any other in 
the county. He aided in laying out the 
town of Elgin in connection with James T. 
Gifford and named two streets in honor of 
his favorite authors, William E. Channing 
and Joseph Addison. He was a man of ex- 
tensive reading and broad general culture 
and his memory was remarkably retentive. 
In all matters of business his word was as 
good as his bond and he had the respect and 
confidence of all who knew him. He was 
a man of remarkable purity of character, of 
earnest purpose and.upright life, and his life 
record forms an indispensable part of the 
history of the county. In politics he was a 
Democrat, and in religious belief was a Cath- 
olic. His death occurred November 6, 1894, 
but his widow is still living in Dundee, Illi- 
nois. They had a family of six children: 
Bernard; John Leander, of this sketch; 
Richard, who died in infancy; Walter E. , 
who was a graduate of Ann Arbor Univer- 
sity and now a student in Mr. Healy's law 
office; May E. and Charles, all residents of 
Kane county. The father of this family 
was twice married, and the children of the 
other union are Joseph and Rosann. Their 



mother bore the maiden name of Winifred 
Anderson, and their marriage was celebrated 
in Manchester. England. Her son, Joseph, 
was a graduate of Notre Dame and the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and stud- 
ied law with Judge Silvanus Wilcox. He 
afterward became a partner of Botsford & 
Barry, and died in 1871, at the age of twen- 
ty-six years. He was a young man of splen- 
did mental attainments and brilliant pros- 
pects. His sister died at St. Mary's College, 
while pursuing her studies there. 

The public schools of Elgin afforded 
our subject his preliminary educational ad- 
vantages, which were supplemented by a 
course in the high school of Dundee. He 
next entered St. Joseph's College, of Bards- 
town. He further continued his studies in 
Notre Dame University, and was graduated 
in 1879, after which he studied law in the 
office and under the direction of Botsford & 
Barry, of Elgin. He was admitted to the 
bar in Chicago, in 1884, passing an exam- 
ination before the appellate court, and then 
spent one year traveling in Europe. He 
did some post-graduate work in Heidelburg 
and spent some time in Frankfort-on-the- 
Main and in other European cities, and, 
with a mind broadened by travel and the 
knowledge and culture which only travel 
can bring, he returned to his native land. 

Locating in Elgin, Mr. Healy entered 
into partnership with Judge Henry B. 
Willis, under the firm name of Willis & 
Healy, a connection that was maintained 
for four years with excellent success. It 
was then dissolved by mutual consent and 
Mr. Healy has since been alone. He is en- 
gaged in general practice and is well versed 
in many departments of jurisprudence. He 
has a splendidly equipped office in the 
building which he owns, and enjoys a large 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



67 



clientele. He also has other real-estate in- 
terests, including two store buildings ad- 
joining the Spurling block, and has some 
valuable realty in Chicago. 

In politics Mr. Healy is a Republican; 
socially, and is a prominent member of the 
Knights of Pythias fraternity and other or- 
ganizations. He has attained a well-merit- 
ed success at the bar and in his other busi- 
ness enterprises, and Elgin regards him as 
one of her substantial and reliable citizens. 



HERMAN H. AND GUSTAVE F. 
KIRCHHOFF, Hampshire, Illinois, 
doing business under the firm name of Kirch- 
hoff Brothers, are dealers in lumber, grain, 
flour, feed, coal and wood. They carry a 
good stock of all things in their line and are 
doing a large and fairly prosperous business. 
They are well known throughout the north- 
ern part of Kane county and the adjoining 
portions of McHenry and De Kalb counties 
as young men of good business ability, and 
who can be depended upon in every busi- 
ness transaction. Henry Kirchhoff, their 
father, was born in Hanover, Germany, in 
1833, and emigrated to America in 1845 
with his father, John Henry Kirchhoff, who 
was a soldier against Napoleon, at Water- 
loo, and who died in Cook county, Illinois, 
at the age of seventy-nine years. Henry 
Kirchhoff married Mary Franzen, a daugh- 
ter of Henry Franzen, who was an early 
settler of DuPage county. They became 
the parents of ten sons and two daughters, 
all of whom are living in Cook county, save 
Herman H. and Gustave K., of whom we 
write. 

Herman H. Kirchhoff was born in the 
township of Leyden, Cook county, Illinois, 
January 27, 1862, and there made his home 



until 1887, in the meantime attending the 
public schools and assisting upon the home 
farm. In company with C. A. Franzen he 
then went to Pingree Grove and opened a 
lumber, wool and coal yard, which they con- 
ducted for eleven years. Gustave F. Kirch- 
hoff was also born in the township of Ley- 
den, Cook county, Illinois, his birth occur- 
ring November 11, 1869. He also received 
his education in the public schools of the 
township and assisted upon the home farm. 
On the ist of January, 1898, the two 
brothers moved to Hampshire and purchased 
the feed store of Werthwein & Zimmer, and 
in February following, the lumber yard of 
McCIure & Struckman, a business in which, 
as already stated, they are meeting with 
success, being accommodating and popular. 
Herman H. Kirchhoff was married De- 
cember 21, 1892, in Elgin, Illinois, to Miss 
Margaret J. Shedden, of Plato township, 
and a daughter of John Shedden, who is 
now living a retired life in the city of 
Elgin. To them have been born one daugh- 
ter, Florence Alice. Mr. and Mrs. Kirch- 
hoff are members of the Presbyterian church 
and are active in all church and benevolent 
work. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America and Knights 
of the Maccabees. In social circles they 
occupy a prominent place. 



ROBERT ARCHIBALD, a successful 
and progressive farmer residing at No. 
434 Chicago street, Elgin, is a native of 
Kane county, born in Dundee, March n, 
1852, and is the only child born of the union 
of Abram and Jane (Crichton) Archibald. 
The parents were both natives of Scotland, 
where they were married in 1847, and the 
following year they left their old home near 



68 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Glasgow and crossed the Atlantic to Amer- 
ica. The father purchased a farm two 
miles and a half northwest of Dundee in 
Kane county, and here followed agricultural 
pursuits, although in his native land he had 
served as foreman in a colliery. On laying 
aside business cares, he moved to Elgin, 
where he died June 23, 1897, aged eighty- 
four years and one month. He was a 
worthy and highly respected citizen, ever 
kind and accommodating to his neighbors and 
friends, and just and honorable in all his 
dealings. His whole life was characterized 
by honesty, industry and those qualities 
essential to good citizenship. He was first 
a Republican in politics and later a Dem- 
ocrat, while in religious belief he was a Pres- 
byterian, to which church his wife also be- 
longed. She died April 8, 1893, at the age 
of eighty-one years. By a former marriage 
he had one son, Abram Archibald, Jr., now 
living near Los Angeles, California. The 
mother of our subject was also previously 
married, her first husband being Daniel 
McNeal, by whom she had three children: 
Male m and John, members of the firm of 
McNeal & Higgins, wholesale grocers on 
Market street, Chicago; and Anna, wife of 
Thomas Todd, of 136 South State street, 
Elgin. They came to the United States 
during childhood. 

Robert Archibald began his education in 
the common schools of Kane county, and 
later attended the Elgin Academy. Since 
completing his education he has devoted his 
time and attention to farming, having be- 
come thoroughly familiar with all the duties 
which fall to the lot of the agriculturist 
upon the home farm where he was reared. 
Being a thorough and systematic farmer he 
has met with a well-deserved success and is 
now the owner of two valuable farms in 



Kane county. In connection with general 
farming he is also engaged in dairying. 
Socially he affiliates with Dundee lodge, No. 
190, F. & A. M., and politically is a Dem- 
ocrat. In the various relations of life he 
has always been the same earnest, upright, 
capable and courteous gentleman, winning 
the confidence and esteem of all who know 
him. 

D WIGHT E. BURLINGAME, M. D., 
is one of the most prominent and suc- 
cessful physicians and surgeons of Elgin, 
his office being at his beautiful home at No. 
18 Villa street. He was born in Adams, 
Berkshire county, Massachusetts, June 8, 
1844, and is a son of Daniel Fenner and 
Mary A. (Mason) Burlingame, also natives 
of the old Bay state. The family is of 
Danish origin and its first representatives 
in England were probably prisoners of war. 
It was founded in this country as early as 
1640. The Doctor's grandfather, Elisha 
Burlingame, was a native of Rhode Island, 
and as a Continental soldier during the 
Revolutionary war, he fought in the battle 
of Long Island. He died of pneumonia in 
middle life, leaving four children, three sons 
and one daughter. James Mason, the Doc- 
tor's maternal grandfather, was also a native 
of Rhode Island, was a farmer and frontier 
tradesman, and died at an advanced age. 

Daniel F. Burlingame was also a farmer 
by occupation, and died on his farm in 
Adams, Massachusetts, in 1895, at the ripe 
old age of eighty-eight years. During his 
early days he was captain of the state mili- 
tia, and did considerable business in settling 
up estates as a referee and appraiser. His 
wife departed this life in 1893 at the age of 
eighty-six years. Both were consistent 
members of the Congregational church, and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



were highly respected by all who knew 
them. Four sons and one daughter were 
born to them, of whom four are still living 
Elisha, a resident of Adams, Massachu- 
setts; Dwight E. ; Phoebe A.; and John L , 
of Holyoke, Massachusetts. 

Under the parental roof Dr. Burlingame 
grew to manhood, and after attending the 
public schools of his native state for some 
time, he graduated from a high school in 
1865. Subsequently he entered the medi- 
cal department of the Northwestern Univer- 
sity at Evanston, Illinois, and graduated 
from that institution in 1869 with the de- 
gree of M. D. The following year he 
opened an office in Elgin at his present loca- 
tion. He has that true love for his work 
without which there can be no success, and 
has always been a progressive physician, 
constantly improving on his own and others' 
methods and gaining further encouragement 
and inspiration from the performance of 
each day's duties. Regularly each year he 
makes a trip to the east for the purpose of 
visiting noted medical institutions to refresh 
his memory and obtain the latest ideas on 
the science of medicine and surgery. He 
regularly visits the old University Medical 
School of Philadelphia, one of the most 
thorough medical schools in the country 
where the work of such men as Drs. Joseph 
Price, Ashurdt, Baldy, Penrose, Deavor, 
and Hart is studied. He also visits the 
celebrated Bellevue Hospital Medical Col- 
lege and the Post Graduate School of New 
York, whose corps of teachers are nowhere 
excelled for their ability and skillful work, 
both in medicine and surgery. In 1892 he 
crossed the ocean and visited the hospitals 
in Europe, especially those of Berlin, Ger- 
many, and Paris, France, gaining much use- 
ful and practical knowledge. Although en- 



gaged in general practice, he makes a 
specialty of surgery and is recognized as one 
of the most skillful surgeons in Northern 
Illinois. At present and for some years 
he has been a member of the surgical staff 
of Sherman Hospital, Elgin, Illinois. In 
his chosen calling he has met with remarka- 
ble success. 

In 1872, Dr. Burlingame was united in 
marriage with Miss Sarah A. Winchester, a 
native of Canada and daughter of Dr. Edgar 
and Anna Maria (Martin) Winchester, the 
former born in the province of Quebec and 
the latter in England. In early life Dr. 
Winchester moved with his father's family 
to Walpole, lower Canada, where he grew 
to manhood and received a good education. 
He studied medicine in that country and at- 
tended a medical college in Toronto, Can- 
ada, later graduated at Ann Arbor and took 
a post-graduate course in Jefferson Medical 
College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
About 1852 he removed with his family to 
Dundee, Kane county, where he engaged in 
practice a few years and then moved to 
Elgin, where he soon became well estab- 
lished and was recognized as one of the best 
physicians and surgeons in the place. 

In 1858, Mrs. Winchester departed this 
life. She w.as a woman of excellent repu- 
tation, and in early life was a member of 
the Church of England, but later in life 
united with the Baptists and was a member 
of that body at the time of her death. She 
was a mother of four children, two of whom 
are now living Mrs. Burlingame and Dr. 
William G., a successful dentist of Detroit, 
Michigan. Later Dr. Winchester married 
Miss Lydia Choate Perkins, of Elgin, by 
whom he had three children, only one now 
living, Maud, residing with her mother in 
San Bernadino, California. 



72 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Early in 1862, Dr. Winchester offered 
his services to the general government and 
in March 25th of that year received his com- 
mission as surgeon and was assigned to the 
Fifty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 
He joined his command about a week before 
the battle of Pittsburg Landing, and coming 
to the front a young, unknown surgeon, he 
was assigned by his superior officer to a 
minor position in one of the field hospitals 
during the fight. While performing his 
duty, a captain was brought in wounded, a 
ball having passed through the bone of one 
of his arms. The surgeon in charge said 
the arm must come off, and his opinion was 
concurred in by other surgeons present. 
The captain refused to submit to its ampu- 
tation and in some way Dr. Winchester was 
called upon for his opionion. After exam- 
ining the arm he said that it could be saved 
though the operation would shorten it a 
little. The other surgeons smiled incredu- 
ously, but the Doctor proceeded to work, 
cutting out a portion of the bone and bring- 
ing the parts together. The operation was 
quickly, neatly and skillfully performed that 
the Doctor was at once put to surgical work 
and his ability was recognized by all. After 
serving over two years he resigned his posi- 
tion, which was accepted April 23, 1864. 

Returning to his home in Elgin, Dr. Win- 
chester resumed the practice of his pro- 
fession and continued until 1871, when he 
removed to San Bernadino, California, 
where he died in 1875. He was a consist- 
ent member of the Baptist church, and took 
as active a part in church work as his pro- 
fessional duties would permit. Every Sun- 
day morning especial found him in the 
house of God. His widow is yet living in 
San Bernadino. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Burlingame two children 



have been born Anna M. and Hattie F., 
both at home. The family hold member- 
ship in the Baptist church and occupy an 
enviable position in social circles. Fra- 
ternally the Doctor belongs to Monitor 
lodge, F. & A. M. ; Loyal L. Munn chap- 
ter, R. A. M.; and Bethel cornmandery, 
K. T. He is also a member of the Cen- 
tury Club of Elgin; the Fox River Valley 
Medical Society; the Illinois State Medical 
Association; the American Medical Associa- 
tion. Politically he is independent. Wher- 
ever the Doctor goes he wins friends and 
has the happy faculty of being able to re- 
tain them. His popularity has made him a 
great favorite in all circles. 



/COLONEL WILLIAM SMAILES, who 
*^s has attained distinction in military cir- 
cles, and is one of the leading merchant 
tailors of Elgin, has shown in his successful 
career that he has the ability to plan wisely 
and execute with energy, a combination 
which, when possessed by men in any walk 
of life, never fails to effect notable results. 
Mr. Smailes is a native of England, born 
in Burlington, Yorkshire, May 14, 1842, a 
son of William and Mary (Witty) Smailes. 
The father and also the grandfather, David 
Smailes, followed the tailor's trade as a 
life work. In 1853 William Smailes, Sr., 
brought his family to America and located 
in Elgin, Illinois, where throughout the re- 
mainder of his life he worked at his trade, 
at the same time being also interested in 
farming. His death occurred in December, 
1 88 1. In his family were five children, 
namely: Rebecca, who married James O'Con- 
nor, and died in 1872; Wjlliam; Mary Ann; 
Janet; and Frederick, who died in 1897. In 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



73 



his religious views the father was liberal 
and in politics was a stanch Republican. 

Having accompanied his parents on their 
removal to this country, William Smailes, 
Jr., grew to manhood in Elgin and in the 
Elgin Academy completed his literary edu- 
cation, being one of the first pupils in that 
institution. While not in school he worked 
principally upon his father's farm until after 
the outbreak of the Civil war. In Decem- 
ber, 1863, he enlisted in Company A, Thir- 
ty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was 
ordered to the front in the spring of the fol- 
lowing year. During his first engagement 
the battle of Resaca he was wounded in 
the left leg below the knee and was first 
sent to the field hospital, from there to 
Nashville, Tennessee, thence to New Albany, 
Indiana, and later to Quincy, Illinois. When 
he had sufficiently recovered, he was as- 
signed to the medical department at Quincy, 
where he remained until April, 1865, and 
was then engaged in military duty on Rock 
Island until mustered out November 15,1 865. 

Returning to his home in Elgin, Mr. 
Smailes worked at the tailor's trade for 
others for a while, and then embarked in 
business on his'own account, then as a mem- 
ber of the firm of William Smailes & Sons, 
and later Smailes Brothers. Since the 
death of his brother he has been alone and 
to-day enjoys an excellent trade, which has 
been built up through fair dealing and good 
workmanship, for he is acknowledged to be 
one of the best tailors in the city. 

At Quincy, June 10, 1866, Mr. Smailes 
was united in marriage with Miss Emma 
Lane, daughter of James Lane, and to 
them were born four children. Anna, the 
eldest, is now the wife of Morton V. Gil- 
bert, a prominent lawyer of Chicago, mem- 
ber of the well-known firm of Smith, Gil- 



bert & Kreidler, and they have two children 
Virginia and Katherine. The others of 
the family were Willie, now deceased; 
Fred J., who is employed in the watch fac- 
tory; and Guy Garfield, deceased. Re- 
ligiously the family is connected with the 
Universalist church. 

The Republican party always finds in 
Mr. Smailes a stalwart supporter, and he 
takes quite an active and prominent part in 
local politics. He has been a member of 
the Republican executive committee, has 
been a delegate to numerous conventions, 
and in the spring of 1886 was elected alder- 
man from the fifth ward. On leaving the 
army he did not allow his interest in mili- 
tary affairs to subside, but in 1876 organized 
a company of state guards, of which he 
served as captain for eight years. It was 
made Company E, Third Regiment Illinois 
National Guards, and was one of the best 
drilled companies in the regiment. For 
two years, in 1884 and 1885, Mr. Smailes 
served as lieutenant-colonel of the regiment. 
He is a prominent member of the Grand 
Army Post of Elgin, of which he was com- 
mander in 1894 and 1895, and has held 
other offices. He was also on the national 
staff of the Grand Army under Grand Com- 
mander Lawler. Mr. Smailes was the first 
secretary and is now serving as such at 
the Elgin Children's Home Association. Fra- 
ternally he is also an honored member of 
the Masonic order, belonging to the blue 
lodge, No. 522, F. & A. M. ; Woodstock 
chapter, No. 36, R. A. M. ; and Bethel 
commandery, No. 36, K. T. In this order 
he is past master and past eminent com- 
mander. It is safe to say that no man in 
Elgin has more friends or is held in higher 
regard by the entire community than Will- 
iam Smailes. 



74 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



WILLIAM H. WING, of Elgin, Kane 
county, Illinois, for many years one 
of the leading attorneys, real estate and 
loan agents of that city, with suite of rooms 
comprising the whole second floor of the 
First National Bank building, is one of the 
best known citizens of the county. He 
was born in Washtenaw county, Michigan, 
and is a son of Washington and Catherine 
(Himes) Wing, both natives of New York 
state, who after their marriage first settled 
in Washtenaw county, Michigan, and later 
moved to the adjoining county of Living- 
ston, where they engaged in the occupation 
of farming, and while there Washington 
Wing was elected to the legislature , of- 
Michigan, and served in the session of 
1845-6. In the summer of 1846 he came 
to Elgin, Kane county, Illinois, and pur- 
chased a farm just north of the city, the 
present site of the Ludlow shoe factory. 
Later he purchased and moved to a farm 
just west of the city, where the remainder 
of his life was passed -and where he died in 
February, 1888. His wife, Catherine Wing, 
died there in March, 1854. They were the 
parents of four children: William H., our 
subject; George W., who died in Michigan, 
April 16, 1842; Mary V., who died in Elgin, 
on the farm last mentioned December 26, 
1862; and Orlando A., now a farmer and 
resident of St. James, Minnesota. 

After the death -of his first wife, Wash- 
ington Wing married Adeline Willits, of 
Delhi, Michigan, who survived him. They 
were the parents of two children: Edwin 
W. , who resides on the old homestead, and 
Katie L. , wife of Rev. Silas Sprowls, of 
Elsinore, California, where her mother also 
resides. Washington Wing was an active, 
progressive farmer, well and favorably 
known. For some years he served his 



township as a member of the Kane county 
board of supervisors, and from time to 
time held other local official positions. 

William H. Wing was ten years of age 
when he came with his parents to Elgin. 
His school life,, beginning in the public 
schools of Livingston county, Michigan, was 
continued in the schools of Elgin and Lom- 
bard University, Galesburg, Illinois. He 
was united in marriage with Miss Abby C. 
Saunders, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, July 
1 8, 1 86 1, and after reading law in the office 
of Silvanus Wilcox, at Elgin, and attend- 
ing the law department of the University of 
Michigan, at Ann Arbor, was admitted to 
the bar to practice law in the various courts 
of..Illinois, April 23, 1867. He soon after- 
ward opened an office at Elgin, and from 
that time on for several years diligently and 
successfully followed his profession and the 
trial of cases in the various courts of Kane 
and adjoining counties. On the i8th of 
October, 1875, he was admitted to practice 
in the district and circuit courts of the 
United States for the northern district of 
Illinois, having cases in both of these courts 
at that time. Of late years he has omitted 
the trial of law cases as much as possible, 
as his large office, real estate and loan busi- 
ness required his entire attention. Several 
of the young men of Elgin have been stu- 
dents in his office at various times and are 
now successful practitioners. 

For many years Mr. and Mrs. Wing oc- 
cupied a beautiful home on Highland ave- 
nue in the city of Elgin, which was re- 
modeled by them in 1891, making it one of 
the handsomest residences in the city. 
There was probably no residence in Elgin 
that contained more elaborate interior finish, 
while the exterior was also handsome and 
modern. This beautiful home was almost 




W. H. WING. 




MRS. W. H. WING. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



79 



destroyed by fire on the morning of March 
20, 1897, at which time Mrs. Wing lost her 
life. No greater calamity ever befell the 
city of Elgin, and the sympathy of the en- 
tire community went out to the bereaved 
husband. Mrs. Wing was a native of New 
Hampshire, her maiden name being Abby 
C. Saunders, and was a daughter of Henry 
and Martha Saunders. In 1854, through 
the advice of the governor of New Hamp- 
shire, she gave up the comforts of her 
childhood home at Wilmot, that state, and 
came west in company with friends, among 
them Miss Kilbourne, who is now Mrs. 
Oscar Lawrence, of Kane county, Illinois, 
to engage in teaching. She soon secured 
and taught the district school in the new 
brick school house northwest of the city the 
coming fall and winter terms, and the fol- 
lowing year took charge of one of the prin- 
cipal schools of Dundee, and among her 
pupils was Alfred Bosworth, the present 
cashier of the First National Bank at Elgin. 
Sending for her younger sister, Martha, who 
was still in the east, they continued teach- 
ing in the Dundee school, and were very 
successful. 

In 1856 Miss Saunders came to Elgin 
and taught school in the building on the site 
of the present Mill street school, which was 
known as the Hamilton district. After her 
marriage to Mr. Wing, in 1861, she contin- 
ued to teach for a time, and became princi- 
pal of the Elgin high school. She also 
taught in the "old brick," where the high 
school is now located, and in the old Bap- 
tist church school, and in the Elgin Acad- 
emy. She was a very able teacher, and a 
woman of much executive ability and very 
fine educational attainments. Her manage- 
ment of the school room was tactful and 
energetic, while her opinions were often 

4 



sought and relied upon by those outside of 
the school room. Many of the middle-aged 
men and women of Elgin owe the excel- 
lence of their instruction .to her conscien- 
tious discharge of her duties as a teacher. 
In later years, as the wife of our subject, her 
home influence and management were quite 
as marked as her school government. The 
boundless hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. Wing 
encircled a host of friends from all points of 
the compass, and it was a rare occurrence 
to find her without a guest. To those who 
frequented her home and shared her genial 
entertainment, her presence was almost 
home itself, and the friendly words of advice 
or encouragement which she seemed so able 
to give to many an unfortunate or despair- 
ing one, can never be estimated in number 
or fruition. Ever ready to sacrifice herself 
for the benefit of others, doing through tire- 
some exertions what many probably never 
realized, her multiplied years of activity 
were being spent, and undoubtedly her go- 
ing to the burning attic the second time that 
fatal morning was more with the thought of 
rescuing something that would be a pleasure 
or benefit to some one than the thought of 
danger. 

The pathetic sadness of perishing in such 
an act, amid the smoke and flames made in 
consuming her lovely home and its manifold 
treasures the labors and garnering of years 
adds to the intensity. She never shrank 
from an arduous duty because of its great 
exertion, and it was grand to know the firm 
solidity of the pillar of strength there was in 
her friendship, which, when once drawn 
out, was an ever-flowing source of proffered 
good, and as reliable as the round of the 
seasons. A devoted wife, she made home 
her kingdom. Faithful to her friends, no 
sacrifice was too great in their service. Her 



8o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



duties were discharged ably, conscientiously, 
cheerfully. The influence of her life can 
never be forgotten, for it is woven into the 
character of our citizens and our institu- 
tions. 

Mrs. Wing was a member of the Woman's 
Club of Elgin, and engaged in many char- 
itable enterprises. She verified by her life 
the lofty ideas that she honored. Through 
her philanthropic principles and kindness, 
many a helping hand has been extended to 
those needing charity. Few women were 
more highly esteemed or had more true 
friends. Those who knew her in early 
womanhood and who sat under her in- 
struction, retained for her a warm place in 
their remembrance to the last. The last 
few years of her life she was compelled to 
remain somewhat retired on account of poor 
health, but her wealth of intellect never 
gave way. A true helpmeet to her husband, 
her counsel and advice were often sought by 
him to his great and lasting good. The 
funeral services were held March 22, 1897, 
at the Universalist Church, Elgin, con- 
ducted by Rev. A. N. Alcott. Her remains 
were then laid to rest in the beautiful Bluff 
City cemetery. Through the heroic efforts 
of the firemen the residence was saved from 
total destruction and has since been rebuilt, 
but the light of the home had gone out. 

In his political views, Mr. Wing is a 
Republican, and since attaining his majority 
has always supported the party with time 
and money, but has never sought political 
office of any kind, preferring to follow his 
chosen profession. He has, however, been 
city attorney of Elgin, and for upward of 
five years was treasurer of the Illinois 
Northern Hospital for the Insane. Outside 
of his profession, and in a business way, he 
has been a director of the First National 



Bank of Elgin for several years, is a stock- 
holder in said bank, and also in the Elgin 
National Bank. He owns a fine farm of 
one hundred eighty-five acres on the western 
border of the city of Elgin, and other prop- 
erty in various parts of the city. Com- 
mencing life for himself with scarcely a dol- 
lar, Mr. Wing has been diligent, and apply- 
ing himself closely to business, he laid the 
foundation for future prosperity, built se- 
curely thereon, and to-day is numbered 
among the men who, by labor, sound judg- 
ment, business sagacity and wise fore- 
thought, have provided for the time when 
it may be well to lay aside at least part of 
his many active business cares. 



OWEN B. WELD, who resides in a 
beautiful home on the corner of Crys- 
tal street and Highland avenue, Elgin, is 
numbered among the pioneers of 1838. 
He was born at Oxford, New Hampshire, 
October 24, 1831, and is a son of Francis 
and Harriet (Mann) Weld, the former a na- 
tive of Massachusetts, and the latter of New 
Hampshire. The Welds are of English ori- 
gin, the first of the name locating in Massa- 
chusetts prior to the Revolutionary war. 
The Manns were of Scotch origin, and were 
likewise early settlers of America. The pa- 
ternal grandfather of our subject, Josiah 
Weld, was a native of Massachusetts, while 
his maternal grandfather, Aaron Mann, was 
born in New Hampshire. The latter mar- 
ried Sarah Melvin, and they reared a lamily 
of five children. After her death he mar- 
ried Miss Ingraham, by whom he had six 
children. By occupation he was a farmer. 
His death occurred when he was about 
eighty years old. 

In 1 838 the Weld, Merrill and Mann fam- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



81 



ilies, numbering seventeen in all, including 
Grandfather Weld, started from their New 
Hampshire home, bound for the Prairie state. 
With the exception of that part from Buffalo 
to Toledo, the entire journey was made by 
team. They arrived in Kane county June 
6, 1838, and found, as yet, an almost un- 
broken wilderness. The present beautiful 
city of Elgin contained but three or four log 
cabins, and they were here two years before 
the country was surveyed by the general 
government. 

Francis Weld, on his arrival in Kane 
county, made a claim to one hundred and 
thirty- six acres of land a mile and a quar- 
ter west of the city limits of Elgin, and the 
house stands precisely in the center of the 
township. He there lived until his death, 
in 1873, at the age of seventy-three years. 
His wife preceded him to their heavenly 
home eight years, dying in 1865. They 
were the parents of eleven children, four of 
whom are now living: Owen B., our sub- 
ject; Mary, wife of Dr. Briggs, of Musca- 
tine, Iowa; Newton F. and Salem E., both 
of Elgin. The parents were members of 
the Congregational church, and were num- 
bered among the charter members of the 
first Congregational church of Elgin. In 
his native state Francis Weld followed the 
occupation of a shoemaker, which he had 
learned in his youth, but on coming to Kane 
county, he became a farmer, which calling 
he followed with success during the remain- 
der of his life. 

Owen B. Weld, our subject, was but 
seven years of age when he accompanied 
his parents to Kane county. Although sixty 
years have since passed he has a distinct 
recollection of the country as it appeared to 
his young eyes. The old log schoolhouse, 
with its slab seats and puncheon floor, is 



vividly remembered, for there he secur-ed a 
limited education in the subscription schools. 
But the farm had to be cultivated, and, 
being the eldest son in the family, he was 
early trained to hard work, and hard work 
it was in those days. The farm implements 
of the present day were then unknown. 
There were no riding plows, no mowing 
machines, no reapers, no four-horse culti- 
vators; in fact, every implement was of the 
rudest kind. To do the work required one 
had to be up with the sun, or even before 
the break of day, and happy was he if he 
could cease from his labors when the sun 
went down. The prairie sod did not always 
readily yield to the teeth of the wooden 
harrow, the rows into which the corn must 
be dropped were very long, but the work 
must be done. 

When about fifteen years old, on account 
of the ill-health of his father, young Owen 
had to take charge of the farm. The re- 
sponsibility was great, but he was equal to 
the occasion, and the old farm never suffered 
under his management. On the death of 
his father he purchased the interest of the 
other heirs in the old homestead and it yet 
remains in his possession. Its limits, how- 
ever, have been extended, and it now com- 
prises seven hundred acres of as fine land as 
one would wish to see. The improvements 
have always been well maintained. Tene- 
ment houses, barns and other outbuildings 
have been erected as the occasion demanded, 
and in 1897 there were four families living 
on the old homestead. In addition to this 
farm, Mr. Weld owns three hundred acres 
at Pingree Grove, where a little town is 
springing up, and which now contains a tile 
factory, stores, a good schoolhouse, a hand- 
some park and a number of cottages. 

On the i ith of January, 1854, Mr. Weld 



82 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth 
M. Kelley, a daughter of John and Eliza 
(Mansfield) Kelley, the former born in Sche- 
nectady, and the latter in Esptirs, New 
York, but who moved to Kane county in 
pioneer days. Two daughters were born of 
this union Hattie E. and Mary May. The 
former married Orlando Wing, and they 
now reside in St. James, Minnesota. They 
have two daughters and one son Mary 
Belle, Lyla Abby and Owen Weld Wing. 
Mrs. Wing has lately made application for 
membership in the Daughters of the Revo- 
lution, both Welds and Manns being repre- 
sented in the Revolutionary war. Her 
great-great-great-grandfather, Stanford, was 
also in the service. Mary May married J. 
Frank Page and they now reside in Chicago. 

Few persons are better known in Kane 
county than Mr. and Mrs. Weld, and their 
memory of bygone days is remarkable. 
Both remember well the Rev. N. C. Clark, 
the first Congregational minister to preach 
in Elgin, and also the Rev. Ambrose, the 
first Baptist minister to break the bread of 
life to the citizens of that place. Mrs. 
Weld remembers the first marriage which 
occurred in the neighborhood where her 
parents located. In religious belief Mr. and 
Mrs. Weld are Universalists, having an abid- 
ing faith in the love of God and in the final 
holiness and happiness of all mankind. 
Mrs. Weld has been an active member of 
the Universalist Ladies Benevolent Society 
since its organization, and has done much 
toward relieving the wants of the poor and 
deserving of Elgin. She is also a charter 
and life member of the Woman's Club, of 
Elgin. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Weld at No. 
52 North Crystal street, Elgin, into which 
they moved in 1882, is one of the very best 



houses in the city. It is a beautiful brick 
mansion, elegantly furnished and located on 
a fine site commanding a view of the busi- 
ness portion of the city. It is without doubt 
one of the most substantial built residences 
in the place. Here they from time to time 
entertain their host of friends in a most 
hospitable manner. Their acquaintance is 
very extended and they know personally 
nearly all the old settlers in the county. 

Politically, Mr. Weld is a Prohibitionist, 
and to the cause of Prohibition has given 
study and thought as well as time and 
money. The liquor traffic has always had 
in him one of its most steadfast foes. He 
is also a firm believer in bimetallism, but as 
a politician he is but little known as he has 
never been an office seeker, and has always 
been content to give his time and attention 
to his business interests. As a farmer he 
was a pronounced success, and while prac- 
tically living retired much of his time is yet 
spent in looking after his farming interests, 
and he now raises many fine horses and 
cattle. While more than three-score years 
have passed by in the lives of Mr. and Mrs. 
Weld they have left but a light impress 
upon them and by their cheerful manners 
they brighten the lives of those around them. 
Few persons are more popular wherever 
known. 

JOHN McDONOUGH is a retired farmer 
residing in Hampshire, Illinois, and who 
for many years was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits, and by a life of toil succeeded in 
accumulating enough of this world's goods 
to enable him to live in ease and retirement. 
He was born at Machelfield, near Belfast, 
County Antrim, Ireland, June i, 1826. 
When quite young he accompanied his par- 
ents to America, sailing from Belfast, and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



landing at Montreal, Canada, being thirteen 
weeks on the water. The family remained 
at Montreal one winter, and then moved 
some thirty or forty miles southeast of the 
city, on the line dividing Canada from the 
state of Vermont. He there lived until the 
age of seventeen, when he went to the town 
of Bridgeport, Addison county, Vermont, 
where he worked on farms for three years. 
Hearing of the advantages that were open 
to the aspiring ones in the west, he deter- 
mined to emigrate where land was cheap, 
and the opportunities were much greater for 
the industrious one than in the east. Ac- 
cordingly, in the fall of 1848, by ox team, 
he went to Ogdensburg, New York, thence 
by boat to the mouth of the Niagara river, 
and by team to Buffalo, and thence to Chi- 
cago by boat. While on the lakes they en- 
countered some severe storms, at one time 
being storm-bound at Manitou, and again at 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. From Chicago he 
came to Kane county, Illinois, and located 
in Burlington township, where he purchased 
forty acres of land on section 35, to which 
he added from time to time, until he had a 
fine farm of two hundred acres. When he 
purchased the place there was on it a large 
log cabin, and thirty acres of land had been 
broken. It is now a well-improved farm, 
with a good house, barns and other out- 
buildings, and all improvements were made 
by our subject. For some years the farm 
has been used for dairy purposes, and on the 
place are usually kept about forty head of 
milch cows. John McDonough, Sr. , the 
father of our subject, was also born in 
County Antrim, Ireland, and was the son of 
James McDonough, a native of Scotland, 
who emigrated to Ireland, and there died. 
John McDonough, Sr., married Rachel Hoi- 
den, who was born in Ireland, but of Scot- 



tish descent, and who died in Kentucky, at 
the age of sixty-nine years. They were the 
parents of seven sons and two daughters, 
five of whom came west, settling in Illinois 
and Iowa. The father also came west in 
1851, and lived with our subject for many 
years, but died at the home of a daughter, 
who was married and living in Kentucky. 
The survivors of the family are: Mrs. Mary 
Steers, living in Kentucky; Richard, residing 
in Ogle county, Illinois; William, in Canada; 
Henry, in Missouri; John, in Hampshire, 
Kane county; Robert lived in Iowa, and is 
now deceased; and Mrs. Eliza Gould, in 
Chicago. 

The subject of this sketch was first mar- 
ried in Burlington township, Kane county, 
November 20, 1852, to Miss Louisa Hamil- 
ton, born in Ohio, and a daughter of John 
and Sarah Hamilton. She died March 7, 
1856, leaving one son, William, who mar- 
ried Ella Secord, and lives in Sycamore, 
De Kalb county, where he is operating a 
creamery. They have one son, Charles. 
On the I5th of October, 1859, Mr. Mc- 
Donough was again married, his second 
union being with Miss Harriet Barber, born 
in Canada, and a daughter of Lahira and 
Anna (Nichols) Barber. By this second 
marriage there are three children as follows: 
Luella, who married Ed. Cripps, by whom 
she has one child, Belle, and they reside in 
Burlington township; Herman, who married 
Dora Kraft, and lives in Chicago; and Es- 
telle, who married Eugene Young, by whom 
she has one daughter, Vera, and they re- 
side in the village of Hampshire. 

Mrs. Harriet McDonough, died Feb- 
ruary 14, 1897. She was a woman of love- 
ly character, a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and her death was sin- 
cerely mourned not alone by the bereaved 



8 4 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



husband and children but by many friends 
throughout Kane and adjoining counties. 
Mr. McDonough is also a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, in which he 
takes a lively interest. In politics he is a 
Republican and for many years served as 
school director and also as road commis- 
sioner. A residence of fifty years in Kane 
county has made him many friends who es- 
teem him for his many estimable traits of 
character. 



EORGE E. HAWTHORNE. History 
for the most part records only the 
lives of those who have attained distinction 
in military or political life, but in this prac- 
tical era it is the business man who fur- 
nishes to his neighbors and to future gen- 
erations the lessons that may be followed 
with profit. Those who become potential 
forces in a community are the men who in 
the face of opposition and competition work 
their way steadily upward, conquering all 
obstacles and overcoming all difficulties in 
their path, and their own successes lend 
added force to the welfare and progress of 
the communities with which they are con- 
nected. 

Mr. Hawthorne is a representative of 
this type. He has long been connected 
with the commercial interests of Elgin and 
is still regarded as her leading hardware 
merchant. He was born in Falls Vil- 
lage, Connecticut, December 7, 1844, his 
parents being Thomas and Elizabeth Haw- 
thorne. His father was a native of Eng- 
land and came to the United States in 
early life, taking up his residence in the 
Nutmeg state. His wife came from the lit- 
tle rock-ribbed country of Wales. His 
death occurred in Elgin several years ago 
and his wife passed away in 1864. The 



family came west in the '8os, locating in 
this city. In his political views the father 
was a Republican. His family numbered 
six children, namely: Richard J. ; Lotta, 
wife of Joseph Britton, of Falls Village, 
Connecticut; George E. ; Frederick K., who 
started for Michigan fifteen years ago and 
has never been heard from; Sarah, wife of 
Frank Conant, a resident of Denver, Colo- 
rado; and Ella, who is living in Elgin. 

George E. Hawthorne was reared on a 
farm and assisted his father in its cultiva- 
tion until seventeen years of age. His in- 
itial studies were pursued in the common 
schools and supplemented by an academical 
course. When seventeen years of age he 
went to Winsted, Connecticut, where he 
learned the tinsmith's and plumber's trades, 
serving a three years' apprenticeship, after 
which he located in Armenia, New York, 
where he served in the capacity of foreman 
of two shops for a year. 

Mr. Hawthorne then came to the west in 
1866, arriving in Elgin on the I4th of No- 
vember. Here he accepted a position as 
foreman for Edson A. Kimball, with whom 
he continued for two and a half years, and 
also spent a similar period in the service of 
Rodgers Brothers. He then purchased the 
store of his employers, at the corner of State 
and Chicago streets, carrying on business 
there for about two years, when in company 
with F. S. Bosworth, they purchased the 
hardware stock of J. A. Carlisle on Chicago 
street, on the east side, conducting both 
stores through the succeeding two years, 
when he consolidated the two, carrying on 
operations on the east side. About two 
years later he sold out to Mr. Bosworth, 
and after six months when his brother R. J. 
Hawthorne arrived from Iowa he entered 
into partnership with him and embarked in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



business on Grove avenue under the firm 
name of Hawthorne Brothers. This was in 
1876. In 1879 they erected a business block 
on Douglass avenue above the Home Bank 
building, occupying the same for eleven 
years, when they erected the splendid busi- 
ness block on DuPage street, which has now 
been occupied by the firm for about five 
years. This is a double building, three 
stories in height, and is occupied with an 
extensive stock of shelf and heavy hardware, 
stoves, furnaces and plumbers' supplies. 
They employ on an average about twelve 
hands and have a very large and profitable 
business, having secured an excellent trade 
by reason of the honorable dealing and the 
fine goods which they handle. 

Mr. Hawthorne, of this sketch, is also 
interested in a creamery in Richmond, Illi- 
nois. At one time the firm had in opera- 
tion seven creameries in Illinois and Wis- 
consin, but have now disposed of all save the 
one in Richmond. A few years ago they 
purchased the Spurling Block, the finest 
business building in the county, the lower 
floor being used for stores, the upper floors 
being converted into fine offices, supplied 
with all modern equipments and conven- 
iences. Mr. Hawthorne, our subject, was 
also director of the Home National Bank 
for three years. He is a man of wide re- 
source and excellent ability in matters of 
business, is quick to recognize and take ad- 
vantage of opportunities and whatever he 
plans he carried forward to successful com- 
pletion along honorable lines that have won 
a most enviable reputation in commercial 
circles. 

Mr. Hawthorne was married in June, 
1869, to Miss Emma Gregory, a native of 
Elgin and a daughter of S. Gregory. She 
is a member of the Congregational church 



and a lady of culture and refinement, who 
presides with gracious hospitality over their 
pleasant home. In his political views Mr. 
Hawthorne is a Republican, and though 
often solicited to become a candidate for 
official honors has steadily declined. He 
is a valued member of Monitor lodge, A. F. 
& A. M., Loyal L. Munn chapter, R. A. 
M., and Bethel commandery, K. T. He 
also belongs to the Century club and to the 
Black Hawk club, which has fitted up a 
splendid summer resort on the banks of the 
beautiful Lake Kosh-Konong, Wisconsin. 
They have there a commodious club house, 
hunting lodge and other buildings, and the 
neighborhood affords ample opportunities 
to the followers of both Isaak Walton and 
Nimrod to indulge their tastes. The mem- 
bers of this club are from all parts of the 
United States, and meet in this lovely spot 
to enjoy the pleasures and charms of out- 
door life. 

Mr. Hawthorne is pre-eminently a man 
of affairs, yet has never pursued his business 
interests to the sacrifice of the development 
of a well-rounded character such as results 
from the cultivation of other interests. 
During the hot summer months he puts 
aside all cares and enjoys a season of rest 
and recreation in travel or in visiting the 
club resort before described, or other places 
of interest and beauty. He is a genial, 
whole-souled gentleman, of kindly manner, 
generous disposition and honorable purpose, 
and his well-spent life has gained to him 
many friends. 

JOHN MANLY ADAMS, a leading pho- 
tographer of Elgin, was born September 
'9. '833, at Aimer, Canada, and is a son 
of Edward and Abigail (Padelford) Adams, 
natives of Oxford, England, and Massachu- 



86 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



setts, respectively. During his boyhood the 
father crossed the Atlantic and took up his 
residence in Canada, where he married and 
continued to live until his removal to Kane 
county, Illinois, in 1843, locating in Elgin. 
Throughout life he followed the occupation 
of shoemaking. He died in 1877, his wife 
April 27, 1857; both consistent and worthy 
members of the Baptist church. 

In the public schools of Canada John M. 
Adams began his education, being ten years 
of age when he accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Elgin, where he attended 
the high school until sixteen years old. 
Three years later he started out to earn his 
livelihood by manufacturing mattresses, at 
which occupation he was engaged for three 
or four years with fair success. For about 
five years following he worked at the plas- 
terer's trade, and then very successfully en- 
gaged in the butchering business for the four 
years preceding the Civil war. In 1861 he 
began learning photography, to which art 
he has since devoted his time and attention, 
and is now one of its most able representa- 
tives in Kane county. Being one of the best 
photographers in Elgin, he receives a liberal 
patronage, and as an upright, honorable 
business man, he commands the respect and 
esteem of all with whom he comes in con- 
tact. 

In October, 1851, Mr. Adams was united 
in marriage with Miss Caroline Johnson, a 
native of Pennsylvania, who came to Elgin 
with her parents, Samuel J. Johnson and 
wife, natives of Pennsylvania, now deceased. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Adams were born two chil- 
dren, namely: Spencer M. , a photographer; 
and Mattie A., now the widow of Alfred 
Kingsley, of Barrington, Cook county, Illi- 
nois, and a resident of Elgin. The mother 
of these children, who was a consistent 



member of the Baptist church, dying in Oc- 
tober, 1879, Mr. Adams was again married, 
his second union being with Mrs. Barbara 
(Duston) Saunders, a native of Canada, and 
widow of CharJes Saunders. She holds 
membership in the Presbyterian church. 
Politically, Mr. Adams has always been a 
Democrat, but has never taken an active 
part in politics, always refusing to accept 
office. He is a member of the Photographers' 
Association of the United States, and often 
attends their conventions. 

SPENCER M. ADAMS, the son, was born 
in 1852, and was reared and educated in 
Elgin. With his father he learned pho- 
tography, and has since successfully engaged 
in that business. He was married in 1875 
to Miss Lizzie Hobrough, a native of Can- 
ada, who came to Elgin in 1869 with her 
parents, Charles and Mary Ann (Barnes) 
Hobrough, natives of England. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Adams have been born two chil- 
dren, Mabel, and Charley M., who died at 
thirteen years of age. The mother and 
daughter are both members of the Episco- 
pal church. Politically Mr. Adams is an in- 
dependent Democrat, while fraternally he 
is a member of Silver Leaf camp. No. 60, 
A. O. U. W. He is also a member of the 
National Photographers' Association, usu- 
ally attends all its conventions, and has 
taken a number of premiums. Many of the 
portraits in this work are copies of photo- 
graphs taken by him. 



HENRY WARFORD, residing on sec- 
tions 3 and 4, Geneva township, is 
practically living a retired life. He has 
been a resident of Kane county since 1844, 
and is therefore numbered among its early 
s'ettlers, men who by their industry and self- 




MR. AND MRS. HENRY WARFORD. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



89 



denial have made the county to rank among 
the best in the state of Illinois. He is a 
native of the town of Butcome, Somerset- 
shire, England, born December u, 1818, 
and is the son of William and Ann (Weeks) 
Warford, both of whom were natives of the 
same shire. His father dying when he was 
but four years of age, eight years afterward 
he went to live with an uncle, and with him 
came to the United States in 1832. They 
first located in Onondaga county, New York, 
where he grew to manhood and received his 
education in the common schools. 

A young man of twenty-six years, Mr. 
Warford came to Illinois and located in 
Geneva township, Kane county, and soon 
afterward purchased a tract of eighty acres 
of unimproved prairie land, two miles west 
of Geneva. He at once began its improve- 
ment, erecting upon the place a small frame 
house, to which he later added a wing, and 
in due course of time had a good, productive 
farm. He remained on that place about 
twelve years, but in the meantime had pur- 
chased thirty-five acres, where he now re- 
sides, and to which he removed after leav- 
ing his original farm. He has now one hun- 
dred and fourteen acres adjoining the cor- 
porate limits of Geneva, which is a well- 
improved and substantial farm. 

Mr. Warford was united in marriage in 
Wayne count}', New York, September 29, 
1846, to Miss Hulda A. Hoag, a native of 
Wayne county, New York, and a daughter 
of Benjamin and Anna (Smith) Hoag, pio- 
neers of that county, where they reared 
their family and spent the remainder of their 
lives. Previous to their marriage Mrs. War- 
ford was a successful teacher in her native 
county. By this union six children were 
born, three of whom are now living: Alice 
M., wife of Jonathan Farrar, of Marshall 



county, Kansas; Eunice H., wife of W. B. 
Guild, of Wheaton, Illinois; and Kate N., 
wife of H. W. Hawkins, of Geneva. They 
lost two infant sons. One daughter, Anna 
D., married Charles A. Barber, and they 
removed to Marysville, Kansas, where she 
died in March, 1890. 

The first presidential vote of Mr. War- 
ford was cast for Martin Van Buren in 1840. 
At that time he was really a believer in Whig 
principles, but the action of the Whigs, with 
their coonskins, hard cider and log cabins, 
so disgusted him that he cast his ballot for 
Van Buren. A believer in the equality of 
all men, he united with the Republican 
party on its organization in 1856, and voted 
for John C. Fremont. Being a strong tem- 
perance man, and in favor of the prohibi- 
tion of the liquor traffic, since 1884 he has 
been identified with the Prohibition party. 
Since locating in Kane county he has held 
several local positions of honor and trust, 
including that of assessor, which position he 
held for six years. A friend of education in 
the public schools, he served some years as 
a member of the school board. While 
serving as a delegate to various county po- 
litical conventions, he has never been, a 
politician in the ordinary sense of the term. 
For many years he has been a member of 
the Congregational church, and has served 
upon its official board. His wife is also a 
member of that church, and both take an 
active and commendable interest in all de- 
partments of church work. 

For fifty-four long years Mr. Warford 
has been a resident of Kane county, and 
while he came here a poor man, without 
means, by his industry and thrift, assisted 
by his estimable wife, he has accumulated a 
fair amount of this world's goods, and is now 
enjoying a well-earned rest, surrounded by 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



many friends, who esteem him for his many 
noble traits of character and Christian in- 
tegrity. 

RUSSELL.WELD has demonstrated the 
true meaning of the word success as 
the full accomplishment of an honorable 
purpose. Energy, close application, perse- 
verance and good management these are 
the elements which have entered into his 
business career and crowned his efforts 
with prosperity. He is now the senior 
member of the well-known firm of Weld & 
Hall, who conduct a large and popular drug 
store on Fountain Square, Elgin, while his 
residence is at No. 1 1 5 College street. 

Like many of the most prominent citi- 
zens of Kane county, he is from the New 
England states, his birth having occurred 
June 1 8, 1824, in Orford, Graf ton county, 
New Hampshire. His parents, Albigence 
and Betsy (Town) Weld, were both natives 
of Massachusetts, the former born in Charl- 
ton. He was a farmer by occupation, and 
died in Spencer, Massachusetts, in 1852, 
aged fifty-two years. He had served his 
country as a soldier in the war of 1812, and 
had held various local offices of honor and 
trust. After his death the mother married 
Jonas Sibley, of Spencer, who is now de- 
deceased. She died in 1893, at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-five years. In relig- 
ious belief she was a Methodist, and the fa- 
ther of our subject also belonged to that 
church. Their family consisted of seven 
children, of whom four are now living 
Russell; Phylena, widow of Thomas Dwel- 
ley, of Oakham, Massachusetts; Daniel L. , 
of the same place; and Adaline, wife of 
Clinton Bradway, of Medina, Ohio. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject 
was Josiah Weld, who was born in the old 



Bay state, but his parents were natives of 
England, and landed in Boston some time 
during the eighteenth century. He was a 
farmer, and died in 1810, at the age of for- 
ty-two years. In his family were four sons 
and one daughter. The maternal grandfa- 
ther of our subject was also a native of Mas- 
sachusetts and of English descent. His 
wife, Azubah Town, lived to the extreme 
old age of one hundred and one. 

The first eighteen years of his life Rus- 
sell-Weld spent in his native state, acquiring 
his literary education in the Lester Academy 
and learning the shoemaker's trade, which 
he successfully followed . for about fifteen 
years. In 1842 he removed with his par- 
ents to East Brookfield, Massachusetts, 
where he made his home for four years. He 
was married September 29, 1846, to Miss 
Content H. Porter, a daughter of George 
and Esther (Adams) Porter. She became 
an active and prominent member of the 
First Methodist Episcopal church of Elgin, 
and her death, which occurred December 
12, 1884, was widely and deeply mourned. 

It was in April, 1869, that Mr. Weld re- 
moved to Elgin, where he has since made 
his home. In company with his cousin, 
Salem E., a native of this city, he opened 
a drug store, which they carried on until 
1891, when the cousin sold his interest to 
Edwin Hall, and the firm became Weld & 
Hall. They do a large and profitable 
business, handling all kinds of drugs, wall- 
paper, glass, paints, oils, etc. Although 
not a member of the Methodist church, Mr. 
Weld attends its services, and is now serv- 
ing as trustee of the church. Politically he 
is a strong Republican. Always courteous, 
kindly and affable, those who know him 
personally have for him warm regard, and 
he is now one of the most popular and in- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



iluential business men of Elgin. He gives 
his support to all measures which he be- 
lieves calculated to advance the general 
welfare, and is therefore justly numbered 
among the most public-spirited and pro- 
gressive citizens of the place. 



JOSEPH RICHARD HOLMES, chief of 
the Elgin water works, who for many 
years has filled this position to the entire 
satisfaction of the public, was born in 
Lincolnshire, England, at the town of Slea- 
ford, November 12, 1851, and is a son of 
John and Elizabeth (Lynton) Holmes, also 
natives of Lincolnshire. The father was a 
saddler by trade and followed that business 
as a life-work. He died when our subject 
was about five years of age, after which his 
widow married Charles Harris, who is also 
now deceased. By her first marriage the 
mother of our subject had two sons, Joseph 
and John, the latter now living in Lincoln- 
shire, England, and by her second marriage 
had five children: Robert, Charles and 
Mary, wife of Thomas Best; Martha and 
Elizabeth. 

When about six years old Mr. Holmes 
came to America with his widowed mother, 
the family living in Chicago until 1864, 
when they removed to Aurora and thence to 
Elgin. Our subject attended the common 
schools of Chicago and Aurora, and when a 
youth of fifteen began to learn the machin- 
ist's trade in the shops of Carter & Pinney, 
of the latter city. He applied himself dil- 
igently to the mastery of this business and 
became an expert in this line. Locating in 
Elgin in 1870, he entered the employ of 
Grownberg, Bearman & Company, in whose 
service he remained for five years, when he 
began work as an engineer. After a time 



he went from Elgin to Chicago, where he 
was engaged on the construction of a fac- 
tory, and in 1888 he returned to Elgin, 
where he has since occupied the responsible 
position of engineer of the city water works. 
The plant was constructed that year at a 
cost of one hundred and seventy thousand 
dollars, the stand pipe has a capacity of 
over five hundred thousand gallons while 
the Holly engines have a capacity of six mil- 
lion gallons and two Worthington engines 
have a capacity of a million and a half gal- 
lons. The plant is located at the foot of 
Grant avenue and is one of the most com- 
plete in the state. It is supplied with a 
splendid filtering system and the water fur- 
nished to Elgin's people is therefore clear 
and pure as crystal. From the beginning 
Mr. Holmes has served as engineer and no 
more capable or trustworthy man could be 
secured for the position. His thorough un- 
derstanding of the workings of the most in- 
tricate machinery, his unquestioned reliabil- 
ity and his conscientious fidelity to duty 
make him one of the most valued represent- 
atives of the public service of Elgin. 

Mr. Holmes was married in Dubuque, 
Iowa, in July, 1873, to Johanna Pabst, 
daughter of Joseph and Hannah Pabst, the 
former living in Elgin, while the latter is 
deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Holmes are the 
parents of six children: Hannah, Gertrude, 
Edward, Jessie, Katie and Joseph. Ger- 
trude and Edward are now deceased, but 
the others are still at home. The family is 
an interesting one, in which the parents take 
a natural pride, and to their children they 
are giving good educational advantages so 
that they may become useful men and wo- 
men. Mrs. Holmes is a member of the 
Catholic church and Mr. Holmes belongs to 
the Baptist church. His last presidential 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



vote was cast for Major McKinley, but in 
politics he is independent. He belongs to 
the N. A. S. E., No. 49, is now serving as 
one of its trustees and has filled other offices. 
He is a man of sterling worth, a loyal son of 
his adopted land, and in the friendship of 
many of Elgin's best citizens he shares. 



W INFIELD S. GAMBLE, a well-known 
civil engineer residing in Elgin, was 
born in Evanston, Illinois, July 25, 1861, 
and is a worthy representative of an hon- 
ored and distinguished family, his parents 
being General William and Sophia Fredreka 
(Steingrandt) Gamble. The father was 
born January i, 1818, in county Farma- 
nagh, Ireland, and was the oldest of four 
brothers, the others being James, David and 
Osborne, who all died in Chicago, where 
they made their home. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject, who also bore the 
name of William, was a native of Ireland, 
and at an early day came with his family 
to the United States. 

In his native land General Gamble was 
educated as a civil engineer, and was in the 
queen's service before his emigration to the 
new world. In 1839, when twenty-one 
years of age, he crossed the Atlantic, and 
for five years after his arrival served in the 
regular army as a member of the First New 
York Dragoons, stationed at Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Missouri. On leaving the army he 
located in Chicago, being in the government 
service at old Fort Dearborn until his re- 
moval to Evanston in 1859. When .the 
Civil war broke out he enlisted in the Union 
service and was commissioned lieutenant- 
colonel of the Eighth Illinois Cavalry, under 
Colonel Farnsworth. The regiment came 
into existence in this way: In August, 1861, 



General Farnsworth proceeded to Washing- 
ton, District of Columbia, visited President 
Lincoln and Secretary Cameron, and from 
the latter obtained an order to organize the 
Eighth Illinois Cavalry. The service at 
that time was greatly in need of more cav- 
alry, and General Farnsworth was, by his 
extensive acquaintance, great ability and 
popularity well qualified for this work. He 
returned to St. Charles, Illinois, which he 
made his temporary headquarters, issued a 
call for twelve hundred men, and in two 
weeks the regiment was ready for duty. On 
the i8th of September, 1861, it was mus- 
tered into service and on October 14 started 
for Washington, arriving there two days 
later. With its twelve hundred stalwart 
men stepping to the tap of the drum and 
marching through the streets of Washington 
it created a great sensation. 

When Colonel Farnsworth was promoted, 
Mr. Gamble became its colonel. With the 
Army of the Potomac he participated in 
many important engagements, and at the 
battle of Malvern Hill was wounded in the 
side by a minie ball. After two months 
spent at home he was able to rejoin his 
command though the wound was a very se- 
rious one, breaking two ribs and the ball 
lodging in his shoulder blade. He was com- 
missioned brigadier-general September 25, 
1865, his command being composed of the 
Eighth and Twelfth Illinois, the Twelfth 
New York, and also a part of an Indiana 
regiment and a part of a Pennsylvania regi- 
ment. With his command he took part in 
all of the important campaigns of the army 
of the Potomac until the surrender at Appo- 
mattox, serving with distinguished honor 
and bravery. He was one of the generals 
on duty at President Lincoln's funeral. 
After the Eighth Illinois Cavalry was mus- 



Of 




WINFIELD S. GAMBLE. 




GEN. WILLIAM GAMBLE. 



.'^ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



97 



tered out, he was on duty at Jefferson Bar- 
racks for about a year, being mustered out 
March 13, 1866, and July 28, 1866, he was 
mustered into the regular army as colonel 
of the Eighth United States Cavalry, which 
was ordered to California by way of the 
Isthmus. While waiting for transportation 
on the Isthmus the cholera broke out, and 
Colonel Gamble, with many of his troops, 
died from that dread disease December 20, 
1866, being buried at Virgin's Hill, Nicar- 
auga. He was a stanch supporter of the 
Republican party, and was a warm friend 
of President Lincoln. With the First Meth- 
odist Episcopal church of Evanston he held 
membership, and was a true Christian gen- 
tleman, as well as a loyal, patriotic and de- 
voted citizen of his adopted country. 

The mother of our subject was born in 
Hanover, Germany, January 31, 1821, a 
daughter of George H. Steingrandt, who 
was a member of the army of that country. 
In 1838 the family emigrated to America 
and located in Alton, Illinois, where they 
continued to live until the death of Mrs. 
Steingrandt in 1867. After that her hus- 
band made a number of trips to Germany, 
and finally died in Hanover about 1872. In 
their family were five children, three of 
whom are still living, namely: Louis, a 
resident of California; Henry, of Springfield, 
Missouri; and Mrs. Louise Steinberg, of St. 
Louis. Mrs. Gamble was a Lutheran in re- 
ligious faith. She died June 11, 1895, m 
St. Louis. 

To General Gamble and wife were born 
the following children: Louise died in in- 
fancy; Louise D. is now the wife of George 
W. Huntoon, of Evanston. George H., 
now a resident of California, was a member 
of the Eighth Illinois Cavalry during the 
Civil war, and was confined for eighteen 



months in Libby prison. After the war he 
was commissioned captain in the regular 
army, and was stationed at Fort Concho, 
Texas, later building Fort Stockton, where 
he was stationed for some time. William 
M., now in the grocery business in Pueblo, 
Colorado, was also one of the boys in blue, 
enlisting at the age of fifteen in the One 
Hundred Thirty-fourth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry. MaryE. is a resident of St. Louis. 
Henry E. is now in Berlin, Germany. 
Emma is the wife cf George H. Stein- 
berg, of St. Louis. Victor H. L. , city en- 
gineer of Rensselaer, Indiana. Winfield S. 
is the youngest now living. Besides Louise, 
those deceased are Elizabeth, Osborne, an 
infant and Josephine. 

Reared in Evanston, Illinois, W-infield 
S. Gamble attended the common schools, 
and later was a student in the Northwestern 
University at that place. In the summer of 
1879 he began life as a civil engineer in Da- 
kota, in the employ of the Chicago & North- 
western railroad, and was subsequently in 
Iowa with the same road until December, 
1880. The following January he went to 
Indiana where he built what was then called 
the Chicago & Indianapolis Air Line, now 
the Chicago, Louisville & Indianapolis rail- 
road, being division engineer there. On the 
ist of May, 1882, he entered the service of 
the Chicago & Great Southern railroad, re- 
maining with them one year, and the follow- 
ing year was with the Northern Pacific 
railroad. He was next with the Grand 
Trunk, and in 1885 again went to Dakota 
in the employ of the Northwestern. For 
two years he was with the Lake Erie & 
Western railroad, having his headquarters 
at Bloomington, and was then in the gov- 
ernment service on the drainage canal in 
1887-8. 



9 8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In June, 1889, Mr. Gamble came to El- 
gin, where for six years he served as city 
engineer, during which time he built the en- 
tire system of city railroads extending to 
Geneva, and also built the south annex to 
the Insane Asylum, which is regarded as the 
cheapest and best constructed building in 
the state, having enough money left out of 
the appropriation to furnish it. He ranks 
among the most able representatives of his 
profession in the state, and does an exten- 
sive and profitable business. 

Politically Mr. Gamble is identified with 
the Republican party, and socially he affil- 
iates with Gen. William F. Lynch camp, 
S. V. He is a man of fine address, of 
genial nature and winning manners and is 
popular with all who know him. 



EORGE P. HAGEN, the leading florist 
VJ of Elgin, was born on the north side in 
Chicago, February i , 1 860, a son of George 
and Elizabeth (Shupp) Hagen. His ma- 
ternal grandfather, Lewis Shupp, located in 
Chicago during the '505, and throughout 
the remainder of his life engaged in garden- 
ing there. Our subject's father was a na- 
tive of Germany, and on coming to the 
United States, in 1854, took up his residence 
in Chicago, where he and his wife still con- 
tinue to live. By trade he is a carpenter, 
in politics is a Republican, and in religious 
belief is a Catholic. In the family were 
eight children, namely: Maggie, now the 
wife of Frederick Klingel, of Chicago; George 
P., of this sketch; August; John; Lizzie, 
wife of George Shall, of Chicago; Bertha, 
wife of Amiel Nelson, a florist of Chicago; 
Otto; and Franklin. With the exception of 
our subject, all live in Chicago. 

In the public schools of Chicago George 



P. Hagen acquired his education, and began 
his business career with W. D. Allen, a flo- 
rist of that city, with whom he remained for 
about eight years. Subsequently he was 
with a Mr. Hanson at Rose Hill for two 
years and a half, after which he was in the 
employ of R. J. Donoven, of Rose Hill, for 
nine years. The following three years he 
engaged in market gardening on his own ac- 
count, but during the World's Fair garden 
products were very low, and the business 
did not prove profitable. Selling out in the 
fall of 1893, he came to Elgin, where for 
three years and eight months he was em- 
ployed as gardener and florist by the North- 
ern Illinois Hospital for the Insane, and on 
resigning that position, he leased property 
at No. 3 1 1 North Spring street, where he 
established his present floral gardens. His 
greenhouses are filled with a large variety of 
flowers both summer and winter, but he 
makes a specialty of the culture of roses and 
carnations, of which he has a very choice 
collection. His early training ably fitted 
him for the business, and he has succeeded 
in building up a large and profitable trade 
in Elgin and other places. The bright and 
sweet things of life have a great attraction 
for him, and he has that love for his busi- 
ness without which there is no success. 

In Chicago Mr. Hagen was married Feb- 
ruary 17, 1884, to Miss Bertha Ebert, 
daughter of Frederick and Christine (Strauss) 
Ebert, who are still residents of that city. 
Mrs. Hagen was born in Strausburg, Ger- 
many, and was brought by her parents to 
this country. Our subject and his wife have 
four interesting children: Minnie, Ella, 
George P. and Myrtle. 

The Democratic party finds in Mr. Hagen 
a stanch supporter, and in the Lutheran 
church he holds membership. Socially he 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



99 



is a member of the Royal League of Elgin, 
and has the esteem and confidence of all 
who know him. 



JOHN D. VOLTZ, one of the most effi- 
cient telegraph operators on the line 
of the Chicago & Northwestern railroad, 
having charge of the station at South Elgin, 
is a native of Baltimore county, Maryland, 
his birth occurring at the family homestead 
on the Reistertown road, a few miles from 
Baltimore City, November 13, 1837. His 
father, Philip Voltz, was a native of Alsace- 
Loraine, born in 1791, and was a soldier 
under the great Napoleon, being one of the 
few survivors of the disastrous campaign 
against Moscow. On the return of the 
Emperor from Elba he again took up arms 
and remained with him until the fatal bat- 
tle of Waterloo. In 1818 Mr. Voltz came 
to America, locating in Baltimore, where 
he soon engaged in business as a market 
gardener, although he was a baker by trade, 
but which he never followed after his arrival 
in the United States. He married Miss 
Eliza Hurley, of Baltimore county, and 
died in 1 854, at the age of sixty-three years. 
John D. Voltz, of this review, pursued 
his education in the school at the corner of 
Green and Fayette streets, Baltimore, until 
the age of ten years, when he laid aside his 
text books to learn the more difficult lessons 
of practical business life. The first task 
assigned him consisted of the duties of mes- 
senger boy in the office of J. D. Pratt, who 
conducted a commercial agency. After six 
months he secured a position with the Na- 
tional Telegraph Company, working for a 
short time as messenger boy and then learn- 
ing telegraphy. Since that time he has 



made the business his life work, and has 
continually advanced in harmony with the 
improvements which have attended the 
art. When he entered upon this work the 
telegraph lines of the country were owned 
by four or five hundred small companies, but 
gradually they have been absorbed by two 
or three large companies, making a more 
perfect system. 

When Mr. Voltz had attained considera- 
ble proficiency, he was given a place in the 
government offices in Washington, District of 
Columbia, and thence went to Frederick City, 
Maryland, after which he was transferred 
to Station No. 4 on the Baltimore & Ohio 
railroad, followed service at the following 
places, successively: Alimont Station, Roles- 
burg, Cheat River Valley, Smithton, Par- 
kersburg, West Virginia, Sandoval and East 
St. Louis, Illinois. Severing his connec- 
tion with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
Company about 1859 he went to the south, 
accepting a position at Lynchburg, after 
which he was stationed at Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee ; Atlanta, Georgia ; Montgomery, 
Alabama; Augusta, Georgia, and Columbia, 
South Carolina, where he was located at 
the outbreak ot the Civil war. At that 
time he became attached to the Army of 
the Cumberland and served until the close 
of hostilities under Colonel J. C. Van Duser. 

When the war was over Mr. Voltz se- 
cured a position in Nashville as agent for 
the Nashville & Northwestern Railroad Com- 
pany, thence went to Huntington, Tennes- 
see, and later entered the employ of the 
Louisville & Nashville road, at Bowling 
Green, Kentucky. Later, at Clarksville, 
Tennessee, he was employed as bill clerk 
and afterward as agent until he was trans- 
ferred to Nashville, Tennessee, where he re- 
mained as agent until 1880, when he went 



100 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



to St. Louis. In 1883 he went to Chicago 
and entering the employ of the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railroad Company, was sta- 
tioned as their agent at Clintonville, Elgin 
township. He has since been in the employ 
of that road, and is one of the most trusted 
and faithful representatives. His fidelity 
to duty and uniform courtesy to the patrons 
of the road has made him very popular, and 
he has gained a large circle of friends. 

Mr. Voltz was united in marriage in 
South Elgin to Miss Viola F. Gulick, a na- 
tive of Kane county, who died December 
14, 1897. She was a daughter of Abraham 
and Matilda (Vastine) Gulick. Her father, 
born in Rush township, Northumberland 
county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1820, 
died November 26, 1894. He followed 
blacksmithing at Liberty Pole, Pennsylvania, 
and after his removal to Kane county, Illi- 
nois, purchased a large farm in Elgin town- 
ship, which he successfully conducted. He 
was an enterprising, progressive business 
man and accumulated valuable farming 
land and other property. His parents were 
Charles and Catharine (Boone) Gulick. His 
wife, Mrs. Matilda Gulick, was also a native 
of Rush township, Northumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Louis and 
Martha (Boone) Vastine, the latter a daugh- 
ter of Henry Boone, a son of the noted 
Kentucky pioneer, Daniel Boone. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Voltz were born three children: 
Jay DeWitt, Florence E. and Aletia M., 
who are yet with their father. Mr. Voltz 
is a valued member of several societies, is 
clerk of Rustic camp, No. 548, M. W. A., 
and belongs to Elgin lodge, No. 117, A. F. 
& A. M. and the Telegraphers Mutual Asso- 
ciation. He attends the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and is one of the valued and es- 
teemed residents of his adopted county, 



whose well spent life commends him to the 
confidence and good will of all with whom 
he comes in contact. 



ROBERT STRINGER, who resides on 
section 20, Elgin township, is a pioneer 
of 1844. He was born in Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, near the city of York, December 15, 
1816, and is the son of Richard and Han- 
nah (Garbutt) Stringer. In the spring of 
1819 the family came to America, sailing 
from Hull in May of that year, and landing 
in Quebec, Canada, in the July following, 
being ten weeks and three days en route. 
From Quebec they went to Sharrington, 
near .Montreal. The father was a native of 
Yorkshire, Engla'nd, born in 1766, and died 
in Canada in 1822. He was a small farmer 
in his native country, but on locating in 
Canada purchased a farm of one hundred 
and eighty acres. His death was probably 
hastened from the fact of losing money in 
saving his eldest son from the press gang, 
that tried to press him again into the serv- 
ice after having once served on a man-of- 
war. 

After the death of her husband Mrs. 
Hannah Stringer took charge of the whole 
farm. She was a woman of strong mind 
and force of character and of great execu- 
tive ability. She reared a large family and 
gave each of her children as good educational 
advantages as the country afforded, incul- 
cating principles that made all of them 
good citizens. She died at the home of our 
subject when ninety-five years of age, being 
strong in mind and body until the end. To 
Richard and Hannah Stringer were born 
eight children, as follows: William, who 
moved to Otsego county, New York, and 
located in Cherry Valley; Richard, who lost 



1 ' '*& 




ROBERT STRINGER, 




MRS. ROBERT STRINGER. 



*'"' 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



his sight by premature explosion, while 
working for the government on Rideau 
canal, for which he received a pension dur- 
ing life; Jane, who married John Burton and 
died in Kane county; Ellice, who married 
Arthur Allison, who settled in Kane county; 
George, whose sketch appears elsewhere in 
the work; William, who died in Cherry Val- 
ley, New York; Mark, who settled in Plato 
township; Robert, our subject; and John, 
who died in Elgin township. 

Robert Stringer was but three years old 
when he came "with his parents to Canada, 
where he grew to manhood and when old 
enough assisted in the cultivation of the 
home farm. He attended the public schools 
of Sharrington for a time, but obtained the 
greater part of his education at home, 
studying with the aid of his blind brother. 
The products of the farm were marketed 
at Montreal. Our subject would usually 
start at night with his loaded wagon, reach- 
ing La Prairie in the morning, and there 
taking the ferry nine miles to Montreal. 
The return trip was made at night, and 
after all it was found there was little pay for 
hard work. One by one his brothers came 
to the states, the last one with the excep- 
tion of his blind brother, coming in 1844. 
Our subject remained with his mother work- 
ing the farm, which, in 1837, sne divided, 
giving him ninety acres, on which he erect- 
ed a dwelling house near that of his mother. 

In 1843 his mother came to Illinois to 
visit her sons, and liking the country, she 
wrote to her son Mark to sell out and come 
to Illinois. This he did in the spring of 
1844, and on his arrival purchased one hun- 
dred and sixty acres. The deed for the 
latter, signed by President James K. Polk, 
was not received by him until 1850, and the 

old parchment deed is yet in his possession. 
& 



Part of this land he has sold, and he now 
owns two hundred and thirty acres, all but 
a very few acres lying in section 20, Elgin 
township. Twenty-five acres of unusually 
fine timber lies in Plato township. In the 
early days he raised winter wheat, until the 
climate became unfavorable. Later he 
raised stock, and finally it was made a dairy 
farm. In 1878, he retired from active 
farming, renting the farm to his son, reserv- 
ing a part of the house to which he has 
built an addition. 

On the Qth of November, 1841, while 
yet residing in Canada, Mr. Stringer was 
united in marriage .with Miss Martha Dibb, 
a native of Yorkshire, England, born June 
23, 1823. Her father, William Dibb, who 
was a farmer by occupation, located in Can- 
ada, in 1821. He married Mary Mitchell, 
a daughter of Richard and Mary (Johnson) 
Mitchell. He died at the age of seventy- 
five years, while his wife survived him many 
years, dying when ninety-five years old. To 
our subject and wife six children were born, 
as follows: Margaret, widow of Leman A. 
Wood, now resides at Lake Crystal, Minne- 
sota; Mary, wife of Thomas D. Cookman, 
of Mason City, Iowa; Alfred H., married 
Alice Baker, in Boise City, Idaho, where 
he died; Clara Emily died at the age of two 
years; Edwin, who leased his father's farm 
July 4, 1878, married Annie Dadswell, a 
daughter of Henry Dadswell, by whom he 
has three children, Alvin H., Ellice, and 
Marion; and Clara Alice, wife of Albert 
Smith, of Elgin. All of these children are 
well provided in life. 

While residing in Canada, Mr. Stringer 
served in the Royalist troops during the 
Canadian rebellion, in 1837-8, incited by 
Papineau, and sometimes called by his 
name. The only battle in which he was 



IO4 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



engaged was that of Odeltown. Since com- 
ing to Kane county, he has seen wonderful 
changes in the country. Indians were oc- 
casionally seen for some years after his ar- 
rival, the prairies were all open and cattle 
ranged at will. He is one of the last left 
of the early settlers, a grand old man, uni- 
versally honored, his long, upright life be- 
ing a splendid example to the rising genera- 
tion. In national and state elections, he 
votes the Democratic ticket but in local 
elections votes for the man, regardless of 
politics. During his early years he was a 
member of the Episcopal church, but of late 
attends the Methodist church. 



/GEORGE W. COOK, who conducts a 
V_J bakery and restaurant in the village of 
Hampshire, is a well-known citizen of 
northern Kane county. He was born on 
section 31, Hampshire township, January 
20, 1848, and was reared on the farm and 
attended the district school until the age of 
nineteen. When twenty years of age he 
received wages for his time and worked two 
years for his father. He then married and 
rented his father's farm for three years, 
after which he moved to the village of 
Hampshire and went into the business of 
well-digging and boring, and also in the 
sale of windmills. His dealings were quite 
extensive over three or four counties. He 
continued in that business for some years 
with gratifying success. In 1894 he bought 
a bakery and restaurant in the village of 
Hampshire, built a large brick store, 25 x64~ 
feet, two stories in height, and has an ex- 
tensive trade in bakery goods, fancy gro- 
ceries and confectionery, with fresh fruits 
in season. 

Burnham Cook, the father of our sub- 



ject, was born in Norwich, Connecticut, in 
1809, and died in Hampshire township, 
Kane county, in 1871. By trade he was a 
molder, although he followed farming dur- 
ing the greater part of his life. Early in 
the '403 he left his eastern home and moved 
to Chicago, where he worked for some 
years, and then came to Hampshire town- 
ship, where he purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres in section 31. He married Lucy 
Ann Lamphere, who was also born in Nor- 
wich, Connecticut, and who lived to be 
fifty-five years old. They were the parents 
of six children, of whom four are living, as 
follows: Timothy P., residing in California; 
Lucy Ann married William H. Pease, and 
they reside in Geneva, Illinois; William L., 
living in the village of Hampshire; and 
George W., our subject. 

George W. Cook was united in marriage 
with Julia A. Gage, who was born in Hamp- 
shire township, and a daughter of Cyril and 
Julia A. (Fields) Gage, the latter born in 
Saybrook township, Ashtabula county, Ohio, 
and a daughter of Havilah and Hannah 
(Hay wood) Fields. Cyril Gage was the son 
of Solomon Gage, a native of New Hamp- 
shire, who married Miriam Gurnsey, a 
daughter of Cyril Gurnsey. Of the eight 
children of Cyril and Julia A. Gage, Mrs. 
Cook is the first born. To George W. 
Cook and wife eight children have been 
born, six of whom are living, as follows: 
Burton C. , who married Clara Amic; Min- 
nie, deceased; Alverta, Lucy, George W., 
Jr., Earl, Edward and Marie. 

In politics Mr. Cook is a Republican. 
For some years he served as school director 
and as a member of the village board of 
trustees two terms. Fraternally he is a 
member of the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, Knights of the Maccabees and the Home 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



105 



Forum. In the latter body his wife is also 
a member. As a business man, Mr. Cook 
is honest and upright, and his genial dis- 
position makes him deservedly popular. 



ROBERT S. EGAN, junior member of 
the law firm of Irwin & Egan, whose 
office is in the Cook Block, Elgin, was born 
in Sycamore, De Kalb county, Illinois, May 
10, 1857, and is a son of William and Brid- 
get (Sanders) Egan, who were natives of 
County Kilkenny, Ireland, and were the par- 
ents of seven children, as follows: Margaret, 
wife of William Tobin, of Rutland, Illinois; 
Alice, of Elgin; Mary, wife of Joseph King, 
of Elgin; Elizabeth, wife of Patrick Keefe, 
of Sycamore, Illinois; Robert S., our sub- 
ject; Julia, -wife of C. F. Irwin, of Elgin; 
and Anna, also of Elgin. The father, who 
was a farmer by occupation, came to Amer- 
ica about 1848, locating at St. Charles, Illi- 
nois, where he remained one year. He then 
removed to Sycamore, where he engaged in 
farming for a few years, after which he re- 
turned to Kane county, dying here in 1879, 
at the age of about sixty-eight years. His 
wife survived him until 1893, departing this 
life at the age of seventy-one. Both were 
devout members of the Catholic church. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject 
was Patrick Egan, a substantial farmer in 
Ireland, where he died at an advanced age. 
His father also died in Ireland, at the ex- 
treme old age of one hundred five years. 
The maternal grandfather of our subject, 
Robert Sanders, was also born in Ireland 
and was by occupation a farmer. He lived 
to the age of four score years. 

Robert S. Egan, our subject, was four 
years of age when his parents returned to 
Kane county, where he has since continued 



to reside. Until seventeen years of age he 
attended the country schools, and then took 
a two years' course at the Elgin Academy. 
For five years he taught schools, while at 
the same time he engaged in reading law. 
He began the study of law with Judge Henry 
B. Willis, who was formerly his school 
teacher. In March, 1882, he was admitted 
to the bar and at once opened an office in 
Elgin, where he engaged in practice alone 
for one year. He then formed a partner- 
ship with C. F. Irwin, which has continued 
since, the firm enjoying a large practice 
which extends into adjoiuing counties. 

On the 22nd of September, 1886, Mr. 
Egan married Miss Laura A. Russell, daugh- 
ter of Ira N. and Charlotte (Sherbourne) 
Russell, of Plato township, Kane county. 
They reside in a beautiful home at the cor- 
ner of South and Jackson streets, Elgin. 

Politically, Mr. Egan is a Democrat, 
with which party he has acted since attain- 
ing his majority, and he is now president of 
the Elgin Democratic Club. Possessed of 
good executive ability and being a fiuent 
speaker, he has been enabled to do much 
for his party's cause in Elgin and Kane coun- 
ty. He has always been numbered among 
its most active workers, and in addition to 
his effective work on the platform, he has 
served as a delegate to the different state, 
district and county conventions. In 1883 
he was elected city attorney of Elgin and 
served two years. Success has attended 
him in financial as well as legal affairs, and 
in addition to considerable real estate in El- 
gin, he is the owner of an excellent farm of 
one hundred sixty acres in Rutland town- 
ship. He is also a stockholder in the Elgin 
National Bank, and serves as its attorney. 
Although comparatively young in the prac- 
tice of law, Mr. Egan has already won an en- 



io6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



viable reputation at the bar, having met with 
a very flattering success in the trial of cases. 
As a citizen he stands equally well, holding 
the confidence and respect of the people. 



DR. SALEM E. WELD, senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Weld & Phillips, 
real estate dealers and insurance agents, lo- 
cated in the Home Bank building, Elgin, is 
a well known citizen, and a native of Kane 
county, born in Elgin township, just west of 
the city of that name, August 3, 1841. His 
parents, Francis and Harriet (Mann) Weld, 
were numbered among the pioneers of 1838, 
arriving here two years before the govern- 
ment survey was made, taking up a claim 
which was the farm on which our subject 
was born. (For further account of Francis 
Weld see sketch of Owen B. Weld, on an- 
other page of this work.) 

Salem E. Weld was reared on his father's 
farm and attended the public and district 
schools of the neighborhood, receiving a 
good practical education. He remained un- 
der the parental roof until twenty-one years 
of age, and from the time when he was old 
enough to drop corn or follow a plow did 
his share in the farm work. About 1860 
he commenced the study of medicine in the 
office of Drs. A. L. Clark & A. Turner, and 
continued to read under their instruction 
until 1862. 

The war for the union had now been in 
progress about one year. Young men were 
daily enlisting and the call was issued for 
more volunteers. Having been in prepara- 
tion for some years, the south was in better 
shape for service than the north, and up to 
that time had been successful in the greater 
number of engagements. Every defeat 
made the northern men more determined, 



and the response to the calls of the present 
were quickly made. Our subject could not 
longer remain at home while his associates, 
the young men with whom he was reared, 
were daily going to the front. Accordingly, 
August 12, 1862, he enlisted as a member 
of Company I, One Hundred and Twenty- 
seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under 
command of Col. John Van Arman. This 
regiment has a record for bravery and active 
service second to none. In the three years 
in which it was engaged it was in over one 
hundred battles and skirmishes. It was in 
the siege of Vicksburg, the battles of Chat- 
tanooga, Arkansas Post, the Atlanta cam- 
paign, and the march to the sea, also the 
march through the Carolinas, with the bat- 
tles of Goldsboro, Columbia and others. 

During the last two years of his service 
Dr. Weld had charge of the field hospital of 
the Second Division of the Fifteenth Army 
Corps as hospital steward, and had the 
credit of having the best hospital in the 
corps. He was offered the captaincy of his 
company, but on account of his profession 
preferred to stay with the hospital. The 
experience there gained has been of ines- 
timable service to him since that time. 

After the war Dr. Weld returned to 
Elgin, completed his medical studies and 
graduated from the Eclectic Medical Col- 
lege, Cincinnati, Ohio, and began practice 
at St. Charles, Illinois, where he remained 
two years. He then returned to Elgin and 
opened a drug store in partnership with his 
cousin Russell, and for twenty-three years 
successfully engaged in that business. Sell- 
ing his interest to Edwin Hall, he engaged 
in the real estate and insurance business. 
In 1896 he took into partnership H. W. 
Phillips, since which time the business has 
been conducted under the firm name of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



107 



Weld & Phillips. Its success has been all 
that could have been anticipated. 

On the i4th of May, 1885, Dr. Weld 
was united in marriage with Miss M. 
Elizabeth Hoag, daughter of James and 
Mary A. (Branford) Hoag. Mrs. Weld is a 
native of St. Charles, Illinois. While 
having no children of their own, they have 
one adopted daughter, Mildred. Dr. and 
Mrs. Weld are Christian Scientists, and in 
the teachings of that people have the ut- 
most faith, believing them to conform not 
only to the scriptures but to common sense 
and the science of life. 

Fraternally Dr. Weld is a Mason, a 
member of Elgin lodge, No. 117, F. & A. 
M. ; L. L. Munn chapter, No. 96, R. A. M. ; 
Bethel commandery, No. 36, K. T. Polit- 
ically, he is a Republican, with which party 
he has been identified since becoming a 
voter. His first presidential vote was cast 
for U. S. Grant. Office holding has for 
him no special charm, but he served as cor- 
oner one term, from 1868. In 1872 he was 
elected alderman from the Fourth ward 
and served one term, and was library direct- 
or twelve years. 

Dr. and Mrs. Weld reside in a beauti- 
ful home, at No. 10 Hamilton avenue, El- 
gin, and there take pleasure in receiving 
their many friends. The Doctor represents 
one of the oldest families in Elgin, and, 
with the exception of the two years spent 
at St. Charles, has here made his home for 
fifty-six years. In the progress and devel- 
opment of the place he has borne no incon- 
siderable part, and is yet actively identified 
with its business interests. He has a large 
acquaintance throughout the county, and 
by all he is held in the highest esteem. His 
ancestry is of the best and most progressive 
people, those who have left their impress 



upon the history of the country. Samuel 
Morey, a granduncle, was the first man 
who ever ran a steamboat in the United 
States. 

EUGENIC W. K. CORNELL, manager 
of the Elgin Packing Company, Elgin, 
Illinois, has been a resident of Kane county 
for more than half a century. He is a na- 
tive of New York, born in Galway, Sara- 
toga county, May to, 1823, and is the son 
of Asa and Clarinda (Smith) Cornell, the 
former a native of Cheshire, Massachusetts, 
and the latter of New York. By occupa- 
tion the father was a farmer, following that 
vocation during his entire life. A man of 
deep religious conviction, he united with 
the Baptist church at an early age, and for 
some years served as deacon in his church. 
His death occurred at Albion, New York, 
in 1854, while his good wife survived him 
fifteen years, departing this life in 1869, at 
Ionia, Michigan, at the residence of her 
daughter. She was also a member of the 
Baptist church, an exemplary Christian 
woman, one whose delight was in doing 
good and making others happy. 

The Cornells are of Welsh ancestry, the 
first of the name coming to America at an 
early period in the country's history. Jo- 
seph Cornell, the paternal grandfather of 
our subject, was a native of Rhode Island, 
a minister of the gospel in the Baptist 
church. His godly example seems to have 
had a remarkable effect upon the family, 
nearly all of whom early in life entered the 
service of the Master as members of that 
church. Ebenezer Smith, the maternal 
grandfather, was a farmer, and was born in 
New York. 

The subject of this sketch was reared 
upon his farther's farm in Saratoga county, 



io8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



New York, and after attending school for 
a time in the neighborhood of his home, en- 
tered Galway Academy, where he pursued 
the prescribed course and was graduated 
when but fifteen years old. He then com- 
menced teaching and for five years followed 
that profession at Saratoga Springs, New 
York. At Schenectady, New York, he 
studied dentistry and there commenced 
practice. However, he did not long remain 
at that place as he thought he could find a 
more favorable locality in the rapidly grow- 
ing west. 

Before leaving his native state, Mr. Cor- 
nell resolved upon marriage, and according- 
ly on the 24th of January, 1843, he mar- 
ried Miss Matilda C. Padelford, a native of 
New York, and daughter of Sedate and Mar- 
garet (Barney) Padelford, both of whom 
were also natives of that state. By this 
union seven children were born: Anna 
Mary, who married B. C. Wilkins and died 
in 1864; Eudora Bell, who died in infancy; 
Clara C. , wife of S. J. Gifford, of Elgin; 
Luella W., wife of William T. Wait, of El- 
gin; Fred A., who married Jennie Rice and 
now resides in San Francisco, California; 
Charles Walter, who first married Kittie 
Brown, and after her decease married Hat- 
tie B. Kneeland, now residing at Elgin; and 
Frank B., who married Emma Butler, of 
Elgin. 

One year after his marriage, Mr. Cor- 
nell removed to Ionia, Michigan, where he 
followed his profession two years, and then 
came to Elgin, being the first dentist to lo- 
cate in the city. For four years he en- 
gaged in active practive, visiting at more 
or less regular intervals the towns of Aurora, 
St. Charles, Woodstock and other places. 
He then sold out his practice and in com- 
pany with S. D. Wilder and Finla L. Mc- 



Clure, engaged in tlie dry goods trade under 
the firm name of Cornell, McClure & Com- 
pany. This relation was continued until 
1862, when he disposed of his interest in 
the business and went onto a farm, which 
he operated two seasons. In 1865 he re- 
turned to the city and formed a partnership 
with W. T. Wait and F. A. Cornell in the 
furniture business. In this line he continued 
with good success for fourteen years. 

In 1879 Mr. Cornell was offered the po- 
sition of assistant manager of the Elgin 
Packing Company, which was established 
and incorporated some ten years prior to 
this time, and which to-day has a national 
reputation, its canned goods, consisting of 
sweet corn, pumpkins, baked beans and lima 
beans, finding a ready sale in many of the 
leading cities of the country. The standard 
of the goods is always kept at No. i. For 
ten years Mr. Cornell served as an assistant 
manager, since which time he has been gen- 
eral manager, and under his supervision 
much of the credit for the success of the 
company is due. The vegetables and other 
products used by this concern are raised in 
the vicinity of Elgin, and during the year 
several hundred people find employment in 
connection with the business. They have 
facilities for making all the cans used in 
packing their various brands and the factory 
continues work throughout the year. An 
average of over one million cases of goods 
are put up annually. 

In early life Mr. Cornell voted with the 
Democratic party, but cast his last presi- 
dential vote for its candidate in 1852, when 
he voted for Franklin Pierce. By nature 
and training he espoused the cause of lib- 
erty, believing in the declaration of inde- 
pendence where it proclaims that all men 
are created equal. He therefore naturally 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



109 



attached himself to the Republican party on 
its formation in 1854, and voted for its pres- 
idential candidate in 1856, the great path- 
finder, John C. Fremont. From that time 
to the present he has advocated the princi- 
ples of that party. While residing in Ionia, 
Michigan, he was appointed and served as 
postmaster, and soon after coming to Kane 
county was elected school inspector. This 
was before the office of county superintend- 
ent of schools was created, and the inspect- 
or served as examiner of teachers for his 
district. He has held other local offices, 
and it goes without saying that every duty 
undertaken was faithfully discharged. 

When eighteen years of age Mr. Cornell 
gave himself to the Lord and united with 
the Baptist church, that church with which 
the family have been connected as far back 
as its history can be traced. The First 
Baptist church of Elgin was organized some 
eight years prior to his arrival here, but on 
making this his home he placed his mem- 
bership therein, and for fifty-two years has 
been one of its leading and most influential 
members. Of those composing the body at 
the time of his coming, only two now re- 
main. Some have moved to other points, 
but the greater number have passed to their 
reward. For many years he has been one 
of its trustees, and for a long time served 
as superintendent of its Sunday-school. The 
church to him has indeed been a means of 
grace. His love for it has been strength- 
ened as the years have passed by. It is to 
him meat and drink. For it he has ever 
been willing to make sacrifices of time and 
means, and seldom is his place vacant at its 
regular services. No other organization has 
ever been able to draw him away, and in 
none other has he ever had a place, save 
for a time with the Good Templars, where 



he hoped his influence might be useful in 
behalf of the temperance cause. Mrs. Cor- 
nell is also a member of the same church, 
and for it has the same love that character- 
izes her husband. 

For more than fifty-five years Mr. and 
Mrs. Cornell have traveled life's journey to- 
gether, happy in each other's love. While 
their hair has whitened, while they may not 
have that lightness of step which was theirs 
when they stood at the altar and took the 
vows of husband and wife, their hearts are 
light, and they have the assurance that they 
have the love and respect of their family 
and many friends, not alone in Elgin, but 
throughout Kane county. 



CHARLES STERNBERG is a repre- 
V-> sentative of that race who have done 
much to advance the interests of their 
adopted country, but who always have in 
their hearts a strong love for the fatherland. 
He was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Ger- 
many, October 5, 1830, and there grew to 
manhood, spending the greater part of his 
youth on a farm. His educational advantages 
were limited, and he therefore is almost 
wholly self-educated, especially in the Eng- 
lish language, which he acquired after com- 
ing to this country. After reaching the age 
of eighteen years he engaged at farm work 
at from twenty to twenty-five dollars per 
year, until his emigration to the United 
States. In 1858, he bade farewell to home 
and friends and set sail for the United 
States, landing in this country on the 
eighteenth of July. Coming direct to Dun- 
dee, Kane county, he worked here by the 
day at anything he could find to do. In the 
fall of that year he rented a farm in Mc- 
Henry county, and there resided for five 



I IO 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



years. In 1864 he made his first purchase 
of land, securing a farm of eighty acres at 
three thousand dollars, securing time on the 
greater part of its purchase price. There 
was a fair house and some improvements 
on the place, but Mr. Sternberg went to 
work and in due time had one of the finest 
farms in the township. He subsequently 
purchased fifty-five acres, which made him 
a valuable farm of one hundred and thirty- 
five acres. 

John Sternberg, the father of our sub- 
ject, was also a native of Germany and 
there married Mary Kracht, a Genoa lady. 
He came to this country with his son 
Charles, located in Dundee township, Kane 
county, and there spent the remainder of 
his life, dying at the age of seventy-four 
years. His wife survived him some years 
and died when eighty-six years old. They 
were the parents of seven children as fol- 
lows: Sophia, who married John Schroeder 
and moved with her husband to Michigan 
and there died; Fred, a substantial farmer 
of Kane county, now living a retired life in 
Dundee; Charles, of this review; Christo- 
pher, who was a farmer of Cook county, 
but is now deceased; Christine, wife of 
William Lempke, a retired farmer of Dun- 
dee; Henry, who died in Dundee; and John, 
who died in Germany a lad of fourteen 
years. 

Charles Sternberg, our subject, was uni- 
ted in marriage, at Dundee, January 27, 
1861, with Miss Frederika Schroeder also a 
native of Germany and born in the same 
state. Her father, Franz Schroeder, who 
located in Kane county, spent the last years 
of his life with his children, dying here in 
in 1863. Mr. and Mrs. Sternberg have 
six living children Augusta, wife of John 
Fierke, residing in Dundee; Fred, who is 



married and residing on the old homestead; 
John, a business man of Elgin, also mar- 
ried; Mary, residing at home; Henry, mar- 
ried and engaged in business in Dundee; 
and Emma, at home. Three of the chil- 
dren died in early childhood. 

In the fall of 1886, Mr. Sternberg pur- 
chased a lot on the corner of First and 
South streets, where he erected a large and 
substantial dwelling, and where he has 
since lived a retired life. Politically he is 
a good Republican, with which party he has 
affiliated since becoming a naturalized citi- 
zen. He has been a resident of Kane county 
for forty years and is a well-known citizen, 
one who is esteemed for his many excellent 
traits of character. Commencing life here 
but with little means, he has accumulated 
sufficient to enable him to live practically a 
retired life. 



SIDNEY HEATH, who for some years 
lived retired in his pleasant home at 
No. 233 Dundee avenue, Elgin, was num- 
bered among the honored pioneers of Kane 
county, who located here when this locality 
was a wild and unimproved region. In the 
work of development he took an active part 
in the early days and aided in opening up 
the country to civilization. As the years 
passed he faithfully performed his duties of 
citizenship, and his interest in the welfare 
and progress of the community never abated. 
Mr. Heath was born in West Hartford, 
Connecticut, January 22, 1812, and was a 
son of Richard Adams and Lydia (Steele) 
Heath. In their family were seven sons 
and one daughter, and our subject was the 
last of the number to enter into rest. The 
birth of the father occurred in Geneseo, 
New York, on Tuesday, June 7, 1785, and 



LIBRARY 
Of THE 




SIDNEY HEATH. 




MRS. CHARLOTTE HEATH. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in early life he learned the shoemaker's 
trade. In 1836 he emigrated to Illinois, 
and after stopping a short time in Lockport, 
he came to Kane county in the fall of that 
year. His son Joseph had purchased of Ira 
Minard a tract of three hundred and forty 
acres, on which the Northern Illinois Hos- 
pital for the Insane is now located, and this 
he divided between his father and brothers, 
Horace and Sidney. The father improved 
and cultivated his portion until called from 
this life, dying on his farm July 10, 1870. 
His wife, who was born Tuesday, December 
23, 1788, had passed away March 30, 1866. 
Both were faithful members of the Congre- 
gational church, and highly respected by all 
who knew them. 

Joseph Heath, our subject's paternal 
grandfather, was born in New York, of Hol- 
land ancestry, was a fanner by occupation 
and aided the colonies in their successful 
struggle for independence during the Revo- 
lutionary war. His wife was of English ex- 
traction. The maternal grandfather, Joel 
Steele, was a native of Connecticut, and 
was also an agriculturist. He died at the 
age of fifty-nine years. 

Reared in Connecticut, our subject was 
educated in the old-fashioned district schools, 
and during his youth learned the shoemaker's 
trade, while upon the home farm he became 
familiar with agricultural pursuits. At the 
age of fifteen he went to the city of Hart- 
ford, where he worked under the instruction 
of his brother Horace until coming to Illi- 
nois with his family in 1836. He owned 
and operated the farm, where the hospital 
for the insane is now located, until 1870, 
when he sold his one hundred and forty 
acres for one hundred dollars per acre, 
though he had only paid about five dollars 
per acre for the same. Since that time he 



lived in Elgin, making his home at his fam- 
ily residence for over twenty-six years. 

On the 28th of April, 1833, Mr. Heath 
led to the marriage altar Miss Charlotte 
Sophia London, who was born in Burling- 
ton, Connecticut, November 22, 1806, and 
was a daughter of Giles and Susanna (Daily) 
London. Five children blessed this union 
as follows: Charlotte Sophia, born Octo- 
ber 24, 1837, married Samuel H. Norton; 
George S., born March 22, 1841, wedded 
Mary Cox, by whom he has three children: 
Harry E. , John S. and Howard and later 
he married again, and now lives in Boston; 
Susan Maria, born February 16, 1843, died 
at the age of three years; Warren H., born 
August 2, 1845, married Elvira Shepard, 
who died a year later, in 1870, and he -aft- 
erward married Sarah A. Munger, of Wood- 
stock, Illinois, by whom he has four sons 
Milo S. , Sidney J., George R. and Warren 
H. One son of our subject died in infancy. 
For fifty-eight and a half years Mr. and 
Mrs. Heath traveled life's journey together, 
and their's was indeed a happy married life. 
They celebrated their golden wedding, but 
our subject was later called upon to mourn 
the loss of his estimable wife, who died No- 
vember 9, 1891. She was always active up 
to the time of her last illness, possessed a 
bright intellect, and was beloved by all who 
knew her. Both she and her husband were 
among the original members who organized 
the First Methodist Episcopal church in El- 
gin, in 1837, and he was the last of that 
little band to survive. He belonged to the 
first class formed here, and for many years 
served as class leader and steward. Al- 
though his father and brothers were all 
Democrats, Mr. Heath joined the Repub- 
lican party on the outbreak of the Civil 
war, and voted for President Lincoln. When 



114 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



eighty-four years of age he was still quite 
active and strong, and had a good memory. 
He was never seriously ill until eighty years 
of age, owing probably to his temperate 
habits. He was always a quiet, unosten- 
tatious man, but his fellow citizens recog 
nized his true worth, and elected him to a 
number of township offices. Very consci- 
entious and strictly honorable in all his deal- 
ings, he became widely and favorably known, 
and had many warm friends. His death oc- 
curred November 14, 1897, and his remains 
were laid to rest beside those of his loved 
companion, who preceded him to their 
heavenly home. In his death one more of 
that number of heroic men who located in 
Kane county in pioneer days was called to 
his reward. His familiar figure will no 
more go in and out among us, but of him it 
can be truthfully said, "Blessed are the 
dead who die in the Lord, for they shall 
rest from their labor and their works do fol- 
low them. " 



B. PERKINS, secretary of the 
1 school board of the city of Elgin, is a 
native of Illinois, born in Barrington, Cook 
county, July 8, 1841, and is a representa- 
tive of one of the honored pioneer families 
of the state, his parents, Thomas and Eliz- 
abeth (Proctor) Perkins, both of sturdy 
Puritan ancestry, having left their home in 
Essex, Massachusetts, and locating in Bar- 
rington in 1838, then an almost unbroken 
wilderness. They at once identified them- 
selves with the religious and educational in- 
terests of the community, and helped to 
shape the early influences in the right di- 
rection. In their pioneer log house was 
taught one of the first schools of the town- 
ship, and often religious meetings were held 
in the same place. The colporteur and 



itinerant preacher of whatever creed always 
found a welcotne, and in consequence of 
their open door for such guests it gained 
the name of Deacon's Tavern. Their first 
church home was with the Congregational 
church at Elgin, six miles away, whence 
they made their way on the Sabbath over 
prairie and through woodland on foot 
or by the slow-going ox wagon. Later 
they were charter members of the Dun- 
dee Congregational church, and still later 
of the church at Barrington, near their own 
farm home. They were pronounced in 
their views on temperance and slavery and 
gave all possible aid to all reforms. Their 
home was often the haven of rest to the 
black man on his way to Canada and free- 
dom, and it was one of the many where was 
fostered that spirit of loyalty to the govern- 
ment and right that a generation later bore 
fruitage in an army of -a million men who 
sprang to arms to maintain our free institu- 
tions. The father died in 1857 aged fifty- 
six years, his life no doubt shortened by the 
hardships incident to making a home under 
the adverse circumstances of a new county. 
He held honorably the office of deacon of 
the church for many years and though never 
prominent in politics was ever ready to bear 
his share of the responsibilities of citizen- 
ship. He had acquired a comfortable com- 
petence when he was called to lay down his 
life work, but the most precious legacy left 
his family was an unsullied name. His wife 
Elizabeth survived him some years, during 
which time she lived in Elgin, passing away 
in 1 88 1 at the age of seventy-five years. 
She was a woman of heroic mold and the 
privation incident to the rough life of a 
new country served to bring into action the 
best and bravest of her nature. As in most 
homes transplanted from the refinements of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the east, the mother felt most keenly the 
limited advantages for schooling that the 
future seemed to promise, and no toil or 
effort was too great so that educational ad- 
vantages might be provided for the family 
growing up about her. A like spirit was in 
other homes of this region and no wonder 
that our present splendid school system 
came into existence.- 

The subject of this sketch is one of a 
family of seven children of whom four 
reached adult age. Three brothers died in 
early life. Elizabeth married Rev. John 
V. Downs, a pioneer Presbyterian minister 
of Illinois, and died at the age of sixty. 
John Proctor was for many years a con- 
ductor on the Chicago & Northwestern 
railroad, now retired from active business, 
resides at Rockford, Illinois. Lydia Choatc 
married Dr. Edgar Winchester, who was 
for a number of years a physician of large 
practice in Elgin, and, later, of San Ber- 
nardino, California, where he died and 
where she now resides. 

The first sixteen years of his life Francis 
B. Perkins spent upon the farm home, 
thence after his father's death coming to 
Elgin to live with his mother, when for 
three years he attended the Elgin Academy, 
preparatory to entering Beloit College of 
Wisconsin, where he was pursuing his stud- 
ies at the outbreak of the war. In August, 
i86i,at the first call for three-years men Mr. 
Perkins enlisted in Company A, Thirty-sixth 
Illinois Infantry Volunteers, and at once 
took the field with his regiment. In the 
campaign early in 1862, under the command 
of General Curtis, ending in the decisive bat- 
tle of Pea Ridge and the expulsion of armed 
Confederates from the state of Missouri, he 
bore his share in the vicissitudes of camp 
march and battle field. About June i, 1862, 



a part of General Curtis' command, in which 
was the Thirty-sixth Illinois, was hurried to 
strengthen the lines in front of Corinth, 
Mississippi, where it arrived just before its 
evacuation. About this time he was trans- 
ferred to Company K, Fifty-second Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, remaining a member of 
that regiment till the close of his service, 
though on detached duty the last part in 
the Topographical Engineer Corps. In this 
branch of the service he took part in the 
Atlanta campaign under General Sherman, 
during the summer of 1864. After the fall 
of Atlanta, his term of enlistment having ex- 
pired, he was honorably discharged from the 
army and came home. After a few months 
of study in Bryant's Commercial College in 
Chicago, he again entered the service of the 
government in the quartermaster's depart- 
ment, as draughtsman and clerk, and was 
located at Columbus, Kentucky, Alexandria, 
Virginia, and Little Rock, Arkansas, remain- 
ing until the winding up of affairs by reason 
of the close of the war. During the season 
of 1866 he engaged in cotton planting on 
the Arkansas river bottoms, and was for- 
tunately one of the few who found it a pay- 
ing venture. In the fall of 1868 he entered 
the employ of the Elgin National Watch 
Co., and worked for them twenty years. 
Seventeen years he was a foreman of a de- 
partment and many valuable improvements 
in the manufacture of watches were made 
and introduced by him during this time. 

In 1869 he married Mary E. Raymond, 
a daughter of an early settler, Augustine 
Raymond. She was educated at the Elgin 
Academy and at eastern schools and was 
assistant principal of the Elgin High School 
at the time of their marriage. 

She was an active worker in the Con- 
gregational church of which she was a mem- 



n6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



her and an efficient and faithful Sunday- 
school teacher. She died in 1873, leaving 
one son, Thomas E. , now twenty-five years 
old, a musician by profession. His musical 
education was obtained under teachers at 
home and in Chicago and completing and 
graduating from the Metropolitan College of 
Music in New York City in 1897. He is 
now organist at the church of the Pilgrims, 
Brooklyn, New York. 

Mr. Perkins has been a member of the First 
Congregational church since his sixteenth 
year, serving the church at different times 
in the offices of clerk, trustee and deacon, 
which office he now holds. 

He is a member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic and is actively interested in all 
that the organization stands for. He is also 
secretary of the $2d Illinois Veteran Volun- 
teer Association and is ever ready to help 
and encourage his former comrades in arms. 

The influence of the forty years spent in 
the community where he now lives has al- 
ways been found on the side of right and 
order and he has taken an active part in 
promoting those measures which he believes 
calculated to advance the educational, 
moral, and material welfare of his city. 



EZRA HANSON, deceased, was for many 
years one of the honored and highly- 
respected citizens of Elgin. He was born 
in Lebanon, Maine, April 22, 1806, a son 
of John B. and Dorcas (Libby) Hanson, also 
natives of the Pine Tree state, in whose 
family were fifteen children, six of whom 
reached years of maturity, the others dying 
either in r infancy or early childhood. The 
father, who was a saddler and harnessmaker 
by trade, died in the east at about the age 
of fifty years, and his wife when forty-eight 



years of age. The paternal grandfather, 
who was of English extraction, was a ship- 
builder of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 
and was killed while launching one of his 
vessels. 

In his native state Ezra Hanson grew to 
manhood, and on the 5th of September, 
1833, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Catherine Kimball Upton, who traced her 
ancestry back to one of the earliest families 
in America, its founder being John Upton, 
who was born in 1620, and came to New 
England in 1639 or a short time previous. 
He became one of the prominent citizens of 
Salem, Massachusetts, served as constable, 
was otherwise prominently identified with 
the growth and development of Salem, and 
died July 11, 1699. His son William was 
born in Salem, June 10, 1663, and died in 
'739 or ! 74- He and his brother received 
the Woodhill and other land in Salem from 
their father. Paul Upton, the son of Will- 
iam, was born in 1709, and was the father 
of Ezra and grandfather of David Upton, 
who was Mrs. Hanson's father. The last 
named was born in Danvers, Massachusetts, 
in 1772, and died in August, 1836; his wife 
bore the maiden name of Hepzibah Flint. 

In 1837 Mr. Hanson came west, and 
first located on a farm near Sycamore, De- 
Kalb county, Illinois. In 1843 he removed 
to Burlington, Kane county, and in 1854 
came to Elgin, and made this place his 
home until called to the world beyond, June 
15, 1890. Although he was a member of 
no religious denomination, he regularly at- 
tended the services of the Baptist church, 
and called himself an "outside deacon." 
A man of sterling integrity and strictly hon- 
est, he helped many to a better, nobler and 
higher life, and he was both widely and fa- 
vorably known throughout Kane county. 




EZRA HANSON. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



He was of a genial and jovial disposition, 
and was a great hand to tell jokes. 

Mrs. Hanson, who was born in North 
Reading, Massachusetts, August 20, 1812, 
died in Elgin March 28, 1876. She was a 
devout member of the Baptist church, led 
a blameless and noble life, devoting most of 
her time to the interests of her family. The 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hanson were 
as follows: Joseph H., born October 16, 
1835, was an attorney, who died in Elgin 
August 14, 1892; Mary Upton, born Janu- 
ary 10, 1839, in Sycamore, Illinois, is one 
of the highly-respected citizens of Elgin; 
Edward, born in Sycamore November 15, 
1840, died September 9, 1841; Daniel King, 
born in Campton, Illinois. October 5, 1844, 
died in Burlington, Kane county, July 29, 
.845. 



H. KNOTT, who is now 
successfully engaged in the grocery 
business at No. 482 Park street, Elgin, be- 
gan-his earthly career in Leicester, England, 
February 8, 1838, and in that place his 
parents, John P. and Eliza (Knott) Knott, 
were also born. The paternal grandfather 
spent his ' entire life in England, but the 
maternal grandfather, Thomas Knott, came 
to America in 1844, and located in Camp- 
ton township, Kane county, Illinois. Later 
he removed to Chicago, where his wife 
died, and he subsequently made his home- 
for a number of years in Mishwaukee, Indi- 
ana. He was a turner by trade, and con- 
tinued to work at the turning lathe until 
eighty-three years of age. He died two 
years later in Turner Junction, Illinois. In 
his family were six children. 

John P. Knott, our subject's father, was 
a shoemaker by trade. In early life he 
came to the new world, but after spending 



eight years in St. Johns, New Brunswick, 
he returned to England. However, he 
again crossed the Atlantic in 1842, and after 
living for a short time in Campton, Kane 
county, Illinois, he located in Chicago, and 
for ten or twelve years conducted a shoe 
store at No. 9 Dearborn street. Later he 
spent three or four years at No. 67 Ran- 
dolph street, and from there removed to 
West Madison street, but in 1859 he sold 
out and came to Elgin, where he continued 
to make his home until his death. Here he 
was engaged in the grocery business until 
his store was destroyed by fire in 1865, 
after which he lived retired. He died in 
1876, aged sixty-seven years, and his wife 
passed away in June, 1895, a ^ the age of 
eighty-three. Both were earnest and con- 
sistent members of the Baptist church, and 
were highly esteemed by all who knew them. 
Their family numbered six sons and one 
daughter, but only two are now living 
George H. and Wallace H., both of Elgin. 

Reared in Chicago, George H. Knott 
attended the old Fort Dearborn school, later 
pursued his studies in a private school con- 
ducted in the Methodist church, on Jeffer- 
son street, in that city, and after coming to 
Elgin, completed his education in the Elgin 
high school, under the direction of Professor 
Francis F. Haywood. He had clerked in a 
number of stores in Chicago before coming 
to Elgin in 1859, and with the exception of 
the time spent in the army and one year 
passed in Philadelphia, he has since been 
identified with the mercantile interests of 
this city. 

In August, 1862, Mr. Knott enlisted in 
Company C, One Hundred and Twenty- 
seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and 
after serving for two years with that regi- 
ment he was detached and was with the con- 



120 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



solidated A and B Battery until the close of 
the war. He took part in the battles of 
Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post and Nash- 
ville, the siege of Vicksburg, the Atlanta 
campaign, and many minor engagements, 
and on the 22d of July, 1864, when Gen- 
eral McPherson fell, he was taken prisoner, 
being confined in Andersonville for sixty-one 
days. 

Mr. Knott went to Philadelphia in 1865, 
but the following year returned to Elgin, 
where he clerked in a grocery store until 
1870, when he embarked in the same busi- 
ness on his own account in partnership with 
John Cox, under the firm style of Cox & 
Knott. At the jend of five years Mr. Cox 
withdrew and our subject continued the 
business alone for the same length of time, 
but at the end of that period sold out. Two 
years later he began dealing in coal oil, 
which business he carried on for seven years, 
but for the past thirteen years has again 
been interested in the grocery trade, con- 
ducting a store for some time on Chicago 
street, but now carries on operations at his 
home place, No. 482 Park street, where he 
has a neat store stocked with a fine grade 
of goods. 

On the 8th of July, 1860, Mr, Knott was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary E. An- 
drews, an adopted daughter of David E. 
Ambrose, and to them were born two chil- 
dren Lillie M., now the wife of Walter 
Middleton, by whom she has one son, 
Walter; and Emma E., wife of Charles J. 
Reynolds, of Beloit, Wisconsin, by whom 
she has seven children. Mrs. Knott, who 
was a faithful member of the Baptist church, 
died in 1871, and for his second wife our 
subject chose Josephine Tourtellotte, who 
died fifteen months after her marriage. She, 
too, was a Baptist in religious belief. Mr. 



Knott was again married October 19, 1875, 
his third union being with Mrs. Elizabeth 
Sears, and two sons have been born to them 
George R. and Leon S. 

Politically, Mr. Knott is identified with 
the Republican party; socially belongs to 
Veteran post, No. 49, G. A. R. ; and relig- 
iously is a member of the Baptist church, 
while his present wife is connected with the 
Methodist church. They have many warm 
friends throughout the community, and they 
justly deserve the high regard in which they 
are held by all who know them. 



ELISHA DUNBAR WALDRON has for 
many years been one of the conspicu- 
ous business men of Elgin, in which city he 
was born January 27, 1848. His father, 
Andrew J. Waldron, came west in 1842, and 
after a brief residence in Batavia made El- 
gin his permanent home (1845), living for 
many years on the present site of "The 
Spurling," where the subject of this sketch 
first opened his eyes to the light of day. 

The father was a native of Vermont and 
his wife, Calista S. (Smith) Waldron, was 
born in New York. They were the parents 
of three children: Martha, now the wife of 
Joseph Vollor; E. Dunbar; and Bertha, wife 
of Dr. W. G. Stone, all living in Elgin. 
The Waldron family traces its ancestry to 
Coventry, England, and the first of the 
name to come to America was George Wal- 
dron, who landed at Boston in 1670. The 
name of Andrew J. Waldron is indelibly 
stamped upon the pioneer history of Elgin, 
where, as an attorney, justice of the peace, 
banker or business man, his integrity was 
never questioned and his business judgment 
was implicitly relied upon. He was twice 
elected mayor and successfully administered 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



121 



the affairs of the city. He with five others 
was the original mover in securing the loca- 
tion of the National Watch Factory. 

It is but natural, therefore, that E. Dun- 
bar Waldron, who has inherited the public 
spirit of his father, should occupy to day a 
prominent place in his native city as a man 
whose energy and enterprise have been 
largely instrumental in encouraging and fos- 
tering the city's commercial and industrial 
interests, as well as in promoting in many 
ways the ethical, educational and religious: 
well-being of the community. 

After a practical education in the public 
schools and the Elgin Academy, Mr. Wal- 
dron left, on account of poor health, to work 
in a lumber yard, hoping to be benefited by 
the outdoor exercise, and the result was 
highly satisfactory. For eighteen months 
he was a clerk in the Elgin postoffice. His 
commercial instincts prompted him to en- 
gage in business for himself, and he devoted 
the next two years to a book store, of which 
he had become proprietor. 

At this time Chicago, the great commer- 
cial heart of the greater northwest, at- 
tracted him and he invested in the whole- 
sale wood and willowware business, giving 
it his personal attention until 1871, when 
the great fire destroyed the city, and swept 
his interests there out of existence. He 
then returned to Elgin and assisted in or- 
ganizing the Home National Bank, of which 
he soon became assistant cashier, and then 
cashier, filling the latter important position 
of trust for eighteen years. He still retains 
his interest in the bank, and since 1890 has 
been its first vice-president. He is also 
president of the Home Saving Bank. 

Conservatively progressive, Mr. Waldron 
has always been ready to help anything cal- 
culated to help Elgin, and many of his best 



investments have been partially prompted 
by his loyalty to the city of his birth. He 
is at present, in addition to the above, 
treasurer of the Elgin Loan and Homestead 
Association, having held that position since 
the organization of the society; treasurer 
of the Elgin Packing Company; treasurer 
of the Elgin City, Carpentersville & Aurora 
Railway; President of the Elgin Lumber 
Company; and a stockholder in the National 
Watch Company, the South Elgin Stone 
Company, and other prosperous enter- 
prises. He has also held the office of city 
treasurer a number of times. A Republican 
in politics, but believing in the purity, of 
municipal government regardless of party 
lines, Mr. Waldron has always exerted a 
quiet influence upon local politics. 

He is a member; of the board of trus- 
tees of the Elgin Academy, a member of 
the Chicago Chapter of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, the Union League 
Club, of Chicago, and an honorary mem- 
ber of the Chicago Bankers' Club. A Uni- 
versalist in religion, he has done much to 
aid that body, and the beautiful pipe organ 
in the Universalist church of Elgin is the 
gift of Mr. Waldron and his sisters, in 
memory of their mother, Mrs. Calista Wal- 
dron Slade. 

On December 2, 1873, Mr. Waldron 
was married to Miss Louise Town, a 
daughter of J. J. and Esther (Graves) 
Town, of Des Moines, Iowa. Their home 
is at No. 181 South Gifford street, occupy- 
ing a commanding elevation, and is sur- 
rounded by three acres of sloping lawn, 
shaded by venerable trees. It is one of El- 
gin's most substantial and beautiful homes. 
In Elgin and wherever known, the name of 
E. Dunbar Waldron is synonym for those 
qualities that go to make life worth living. 



J22 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



JOHN NEWMAN. In proportion to its 
population the city of Elgin numbers 
among its men of wealth, standing, charac- 
ter and business enterprise as many as any 
city in the land. Among those recognized 
as being in the front, and whose skill and 
ability is unquestioned, is the man whose 
name heads this sketch, one who came to 
this country from across the water some 
forty years ago, an unknown lad, without 
influential friends to aid him in life's work. 
However, he brought with him a stout 
heart, willing hands and a determination to 
succeed, and success has crowned his efforts 
in a remarkable degree. 

A native of England, Mr. Newman was 
born at Bishop Stortford, Herefordshire, 
March u, 1842, and is a son of William 
and Emma (Thurgood) Newman, also na- 
tives of England, who lived and died in 
that country. Leaving school at the age 
of fourteen years, he was apprenticed to a 
a draper and grocer, with whom he contin- 
ued three years, and then resolved to come 
to the United States, where the opportuni- 
ties were much greater than in his own 
country for the enterprising person. He 
was in his eighteenth year when he left his 
English home, and on the 29th of Septem- 
ber, 1859, he landed at New York, and one 
month later he located in Chicago, where 
he found employment with Potter Palmer as 
clerk in his dry-goods store. After remain- 
ing with Mr. Palmer for about a year, he 
engaged with Ross & Foster, with whom he 
continued until 1864. Instead of spending 
all his salary on good clothes and for per- 
sonal pleasure, as is so often done by mer- 
cantile clerks, from the amount received 
each payday he laid aside a portion, until 
his accumulations were sufficient to justify 
embarking in business on his own account. 



Even at that time Elgin was quite a trading 
point, with a good reputation, and on leav- 
ing the employ of Ross & Foster he came 
direct to this place and bought out the dry- 
goods store of M. & J. McNeil, which busi- 
ness he still continues. From that time to 
the present, more than a third of a cen- 
tury, he has been identified with the busi- 
ness interests of the city. The store pur- 
chased of the McNeils has grown with the 
city's growth until to-day it is one of the 
largest in Kane county. To its supervision 
he has always given his personal attention, 
and his stock is at all times varied and 
suited to the times. 

As his means increased Mr. Newman has 
branched out and invested in other enter- 
prises that have not alone added to his in- 
dividual wealth, but to the wealth and gen- 
eral prosperity of the city. About 1876 he 
established the Spring Brook creamery at 
Elgin. The business was commenced in a 
modest way, but with the determination to 
make it noted for the excellent quality of 
butter and cheese manufactured. It was 
but a short time before it became known 
that the mark upon the boxes and cases 
"From the Spring Brook Creamery," was 
a guarantee of excellent quality. Year by 
year the business increased and creamery 
after creamery was added until to-day the 
Spring Brook creameries have over forty 
plants in active operation. The same good 
quality has ever been maintained and the 
reputation of its manufactured product is a 
No. i. The business is now conducted by 
the John Newman Company, of which he 
is the principal proprietor, being ably as- 
sisted by his brother, Joseph Newman, in 
the general management. 

For some years Mr. Newman has been 
a stockholder in the First National Bank of 




JOHN NEWMAN. 



IHE 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



125 



Elgin, a stockholder and president of the 
Elgin City Banking Company, one of the 
strongest and safest savings banks in the 
state outside of Chicago. His conservative 
nature, combined with a progressive spirit, 
makes him a model officer of such a finan- 
cial institution.' For many years he acted 
as treasurer and vice-president of the Elgin 
Board of Trade, and since 1894 has been its 
president, a position which he ably fills, and 
which enables him to do much for his 
adopted city. He never hesitates to do that 
which will advance the general interests of 
the city and cause it to occupy a front rank 
among its sister cities in the great common- 
wealth of Illinois. 

Mr. Newman has been twice married, 
his first union being with Miss Haddie Vir- 
ginia Beaty, daughter of Colonel John Farr 
Beaty, who was for many years secretary 
of the Chicago Board of Trade. Their 
marriage was celebrated September 5, 1867, 
at the home of the bride's parents in Elgin. 
By this union were four children: Paul B. , 
who is associated with his father in the mer- 
cantile trade; John B., who is employed in 
the First National Bank of Elgin; Hattie, a 
young lady admired and esteemed by all 
who knew her, who was called from this life 
May 5, 1895; and William, who is in the of- 
fice of the John Newman Company. The 
mother of these children died April 27, 
1876. She was a consistent member of the 
Protestant Episcopal church, one whose life 
was in strict conformity to the teachings of 
the lowly Nazarene. 

The second marriage of Mr. Newman 
was on the 27th of October, 1887, when 
he wedded Mrs. Laura J. Borden, of Fort 
Bend county, Texas, a daughter of Ezekiel 
and Martha M. (Winfrey) George, natives 
of Wharton county, Texas. She is a lady 

6 



of high culture and rare social qualities, 
a member of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, and enjoys the love and esteem of 
all who know her. 

Politically, Mr. Newman is a Democrat, 
with which party he has acted since becom- 
ing a citizen of the United States. In 1896, 
on the division of the party on the silver 
question, he took the gold side, believing 
the honor and integrity of the country 
should be maintained, and not degraded as 
it would be by a debased currency as advo- 
cated by those favoring the unlimited coin- 
age of silver at the ratio of 16 to i. He is 
known as a Cleveland Democrat. While a 
politician in the true sense of the term, he 
has never been an office seeker. Time and 
again he has been solicited to give the use 
of his name as a candidate for mayor of El- 
gin, but has inyariably refused the proffered 
honor. The only political office he ever 
held was that of trustee of the Northern 
Illinois Hospital for the Insane, receiving 
his appointment from Governor Altgeld. 
While he held the office he discharged his 
duties faithfully and well, to the entire sat- 
isfaction of all concerned. Because of the 
fact that he could not agree with the gov- 
ernor in his peculiar views on the silver 
question, or become a tool in his hand, he 
was removed by that gentleman, an act that 
did the governor no good, but which made 
Mr. Newman many warm friends. 

A friend of education, Mr. Newman 
served for many years as a member of the 
board of education of Elgin, and for six 
years was its president. During that time 
four new school buildings were erected. 
For a number of years he has been treas- 
urer of the Elgin Opera House Company. 
He has always held a prominent place in 
musical circles, and for years was president 



126 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the Elgin Choral Union. The only 
society with which he is connected is the 
St. George Benevolent Society, of which he 
was presiding officer for a long time. Re- 
ligiously he is a member of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, and for that Church in 
Elgin he has done much in various ways, 
contributing of his time and means to its 
upbuilding. He is also one of the leading 
members of the Century Club of Elgin. 

While Mr. Newman is known as one of 
the most prosperous business men of Elgin, 
it must not be supposed that it has always 
been smooth sailing with him, and that no 
losses have been experienced. Twice he 
was burned out, entailing upon him heavy 
losses, but like the famed Phoenix, there 
arose from the ashes larger and better build- 
ings and more extensive stocks than before. 
On one occasion when burned out, and 
while the smoke was still going up, he 
rented a vacant storeroom, went to Chicago, 
purchased a new stock, and was ready for 
business within two days. 

Such in brief is the life record of John 
Newman. For more than a third of a cen- 
tury he has gone in and out among the 
people of Elgin, leaving his impress upon 
almost every public enterprise, giving of 
his time and means to advance the city's 
interest. Broad and liberal minded, he is 
honored and respected by all. While at 
all times having a large number of men in 
his employ, he treats them kindly and in a 
considerate manner, showing himself to be 
their friend as they are his friends, and will 
do for him everything in their power. 

Mr. and Mrs. Newman reside in a beauti- 
ful home at No. 321 Division street, Elgin, 
which is the abode of genuine hospitality, 
and where many friends are received and 
handsomely entertained. They have like- 



wise a fine summer residence on Lake 
Geneva, Wisconsin, where they spend a 
portion of the year. They believe in enjoy- 
ing this life, as well they may. 



I SAAC V. DOTY is a retired farmer resid- 
1 ing on section 28. Hampshire township, 
and who has spent more than fifty-three 
years of his life in Kane county, Illinois. He 
was born in the town of Granville, near Lake 
Champlain, Washington county, New York, 
January 17, 1819, and is second in a family 
of five children born to Levi and Sallie 
(Bredenburgh) Doty. The father was a 
farmer and owned a large tract of land in 
Washington county, New York. 

When our subject was but nine years 
old his mother died, and until the age of 
sixteen or seventeen years he attended a 
common school of his native state, after 
which he did farm work for neighbors. 
Later he rented a part of his father's farm, 
and, being united in marriage with Miss Ce- 
leste Thorington, began life for himself. She 
died leaving one child, Margaret, now the 
wife of Porter Baldwin, by whom she has 
six children. 

In May, 1845, Mr. Doty left his native 
state for the west, taking a canal boat at 
Whitehall to Buffalo, New York, the fare 
being two dollars. They carried their own 
provisions with them for use upon the boat. 
From Buffalo they went to Chicago by lake, 
the fare for which was three dollars. From 
Chicago they came to what is now Starks 
Station, in Rutland township, Kane county, 
Illinois, where a brother-in-law was then 
living. He began farming on Starks' farm, 
where he remained three years, and then 
moved to Hampshire township, to the farm 
of his wife's father, eighty acres of which 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



127 



had been deeded to her. This our subject 
commenced at once to improve, erected 
every building, made every rod of fence, set 
out many of the shade trees, and for many 
years was there engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. 

On the 3d of October, 1855, the second 
marriage of our subject occurred in Hamp- 
shire township, when he wedded Mrs. Au- 
rilla Ingersol, widow of Orrin L. Ingersol, 
and to them four children were born, as 
follows: Mary, who married Julius H. Nor- 
ton, who served in the war for the Union, 
and their four living children are Julius, 
William, Emma and Aurilla. Lucy mar- 
ried C. V. Jacobs, who was also in the war, 
and by whom she had one child, Mary, who 
is living; she is now deceased. William, 
who married Flora King, by whom he has 
two children, Ruth and Donald. Sidney, 
who died at the age of four years. Mrs. 
Doty is a daughter of Philip Terwilliger, a 
native of New York state, and of an old 
Dutch family. He married Mary Low, of 
Orange county. New York, and a daughter 
of Daniel Low, who died at the age of 
eighty years. He married a Miss Crany, 
who attained the age of eighty-six years. 
Daniel Low, Jr., is now living at Chenango 
Forks, New York, at the age of ninety years. 
Philip Terwilliger served in the war of 1812. 
He came to Kane county, Illinois, and built 
the first frame house in Hampshire town- 
ship, where he owned a large tract of land. 
He died at the age of sixty-nine years. His 
father, James Terwilliger, married Eliza 
Terwilliger, and their respective ages at 
death were seventy-seven and seventy-three. 

Fraternally Mr. Doty is a member of the 
Masonic order, and religiously of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, of which body his 
wife is also a member. In politics he is a 



Republican, and has held the offices of school 
director and road commissioner. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Doty are numbered among the old 
settlers of Kane county. They remember 
when houses were few and far between, and 
they have seen wolves, deer and other game 
in large numbers in the vicinity. Mr. Doty 
was always a good marksman, and even 
now, at the age of seventy-nine years, can 
kill chickens with a rifle. 



WILLIAM HENNEL BLACK. For- 
tunate is he who has back of him an 
ancestry honorable and distinguished, and 
happy is he if his lines of life are cast in 
harmony therewith. Our subject is blessed 
in this respect, for he springs from promi- 
nent families of New England, and he has 
become one of the leading and representa- 
tive citizens of Elgin. 

Mr. Black was born in Ellsworth, Maine, 
January i, 1845, a son of William Hennel 
and Abigail Eliza (Little) Black. His father 
was born in the same place October 18, 
i8it, a son of Colonel John and Mary 
(Cobb) Black. The birth of the grand- 
father occurred July 3, 1781, in London, 
England, where he obtained a good educa- 
tion, and when quite young entered the 
great banking house of Hope & Company, of 
that city, as clerk. While visiting London, 
in 1799, William Bingham, of Philadelphia, 
the principal proprietor of the great Bing- 
ham estate in Maine, employed Mr. Black 
to come to this country as clerk for General 
David Cobb, of Gouldsboro, Maine, agent 
for the estate. Mr. Black arrived the same 
year and soon mastered the details relating 
to the landed interests of the proprietors. 
From 1803 until 1808 he served as town 
clerk of Gouldsboro, was justice of the 



128 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



peace in 1804-5. He soon secured the 
confidence of his employers, agents and all 
persons doing business with him, and when 
Donald Ross, local agent at Ellsworth, was 
compelled to resign on account of ill health, 
Mr. Black was appointed to succeed him, 
removing to that place. When General 
Cobb and his associate agent, Mr. Richards, 
resigned, he was appointed general agent of 
the estate, which position he continued to 
fill until 1850, when he was succeeded by 
his son, George N. Black. For many years 
he was largely interested in the manufacture 
of lumber and ship-building, and in his 
business acquired a comfortable competence. 
He took an active and prominent part in 
military affairs, was commissioned captain 
July 2, 1805, of a company in the Second 
Regiment, Second Brigade, Tenth Division 
of Massachusetts Militia, Eastern Division, 
of which his father-in-law, General Cobb, 
was major-general; later was elected major 
of the same regiment, was breveted lieuten- 
ant-colonel June 12, 1812, and commanded 
the regiment when it was called to Mount 
Desert to repel a threatened British in- 
vasion, 1812-13. Although he was British 
born and at that time an agent for foreign 
principals, he did not hesitate. He was 
commissioned colonel June 20, 1816, but 
February n, 1817, resigned and was dis- 
charged. Subsequently he was for many 
years captain of the Cobb Light Infantry, 
an independent company organized near his 
home. He died at Ellsworth October 20, 
1856. He was one of the most prominent 
men in his community, his honor and hon- 
esty were never questioned, and he possessed 
all of those qualities which go to make up a 
good citizen, neighbor and friend. 

In 1802 Colonel John Black married 
Miss Mary Cobb, daughter of General David 



and Eleanor (Bradish) Cobb. She was 
born at Taunton, Massachusetts, July 26, 
1776, and died in Ellsworth, Maine, Octo- 
ber 17, 1851. The children born to them 
are Mary Ann, John, Henry, Elizabeth, 
William Hennel, George Nixon, Alexander 
Baring and Charles Richards. 

General David Cobb, a son of Colonel 
Thomas and Lydia (Leonard) Cobb, was 
born in Attleboro, Massachusetts, Septem- 
ber 14, 1748, and was graduated at Har- 
vard College, in 1766, after which he stud- 
ied medicine and engaged in practice at 
Taunton, Massachusetts, for some time. 
He was a representative to the general 
court from that place in 1774, and the 
same year was elected to the provincial 
congress which met in Cambridge. In 1777, 
during the Revolutionary war, he was elect- 
ed lieutenant-colonel of the Sixteenth Mass- 
achusetts Regiment, was later elected 
colonel, and was afterward appointed by 
General Washington as one of his staff, 
where, out of five, he was second in rank. 
He always took a prominent part in public 
affairs, served as chief justice of the court 
of common pleas for eight years, was rep- 
resentative and speaker of the general court 
from 1789 to 1793, resigning when elected 
a member of the third congress of the Uni- 
ted States, and held other prominent posi- 
tions. He died April 17, 1830, honored 
and highly esteemed by all who knew him. 
In 1766 he married Eleanor, daughter of 
Ebenezer and Eunice (Cook) Bradish, of 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. She was born 
January 30, 1749, and died in Taunton, 
January 7, 1808. Their children were 
Eleanor Bradish, Betsy, Thomas, William 
Gray, Eunice, Mary (the paternal grand- 
mother of our subject), David, Sally, Eben- 
ezer, Henry Jackson, and David George 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



129 



Washington. General Cobb was an inti- 
mate friend and associate of General Wash- 
ington, Nathaniel Greene, Benjamin Lin- 
coln, Henry Knox, Henry Jackson, General 
La Fayette and Alexander Hamilton. 

Colonel Thomas Cobb, the father of the 
General, married Lydia, eldest daughter of 
James Leonard, of Taunton, Massachusetts, 
and the only son born to them was David. 
Morgan Cobb, father of Thomas, was born 
December 29, 1673, and died September 
30, 1755. On the 22nd of May, 1735, he 
was married to Esther Hodges, a daughter 
of Henry Hodges and his wife Esther, 
daughter of Captain John Galloy, probably 
a direct descendant of Emperor Charle- 
magne. Mrs. Esther Cobb was born Feb- 
ruary 17, 1678, and was the mother of 
Thomas. Morgan Cobb was a son of Au- 
gustine Cobb, a native of Norfolk, England, 
who came to Taunton, Massachusetts, in 
1670. 

William H. Black, ST., our subject's fa- 
ther, spent his entire life in Ellsworth, 
Maine, and throughout his business career 
engaged quite extensively in farming, lum- 
bering and ship building. He met with 
good success until later in life, when he suf- 
fered some heavy losses, from which he was 
never fully able to recover. His death oc- 
curred October 17, 1883. On the 4th of 
June, 1834, he was married to Miss Abigail 
Eliza Little, who was born in Castine, Maine, 
September 16, t8io, a daughter of Doty 
and Mercy (Tilden) Little. Her father was 
born at Marshfield, Massachusetts, October 
3, 1766, a son of Thomas Little, who was 
born in 1719, and was a son of John Little, 
who married Anna, daughter of Richard 
Warren, who came to this country in the 
Mayflower in 1620. Thomas Little, born 
1719, married in 1750, Sarah Baker, a 



daughter of Kenelm and Patience (Winslow) 
Baker, and they had ten children, all born 
in Marshfield, Massachusetts. 

The children born to William H. and 
Abigail E. (Little) Black were as follows: 
Maria S., wife of Charles J. Perry, of Ells- 
worth, Maine; Harriet S. , who first married 
Edward S. Tisdale, and after his death An- 
dresv B. Spurling, of Elgin, Illinois, and 
died May 26, 1896; Charles S., who died as 
a paroled prisoner in the hospital at Annap- 
olis, Maryland, September 16, 1864, from 
wounds received at Gaine's Mills, while in 
the service; Celia C. , the wife of George A. 
Dickey, now of Wollaston, Massachusetts; 
Hollis C. married Mary E. Deming. His 
business was in Boston, residing in Wollas- 
ton; his death occurred at Allisworth, Maine, 
Jnly 14, 1893; Oscar T., twin of Hollis C., 
died in infancy; William H., the subject of 
this sketch; Lucie L. , wife of Harvard Gree- 
ly, of Ellsworth, and Mary H., also of Ells- 
worth. 

Reared at the old home in Ellsworth, 
Mr. Black, of this review, began his educa- 
tion in the common schools of that locality, 
and later attended an academy. In Ells- 
worth he also learned the watch-maker's 
trade, and on the 6th of September, 1865, 
went to Waltham, Massachusetts, where he 
obtained a position in the finishing depart- 
ment of the watch factory, remaining there 
until December, 1867, when he first came 
to Elgin. He was employed in the finishing 
department of the watch factory at this 
place until 1870, when he returned to Wal- 
tham, but in June, 1873, again came to El- 
gin, where he has since made his home. 
During all this time he has been connected 
with the Elgin Watch Factory, and since 
the ist of January, 1877, has been foreman 
of the finishing department, having about 



130 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



one hundred men working under him. This 
long term of service in this capacity is an 
evidence that his services are duly appre- 
ciated by his employers. 

In Elgin, on the 23d of May, 1868, Mr. 
Black was united in marriage with Mrs. Fan- 
nie S. Kilbourne, a native of Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts, and a daughter of Joshua F. 
and Rebecca (Arnold) Smith, who were also 
born in Fitchburg, where one son is still 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Black have a pleas- 
ant home on Chicago street, Elgin, which 
was erected from plans made by himself. 
Politically he is identified with the Repub- 
lican party, and socially affiliates with the 
Masonic fraternity. He is a pleasant, genial 
gentleman, who commands the respect and 
esteem of all who know him. Mrs. Black 
holds membership in the Universalist church, 
and like her husband has many warm friends 
in her adopted city. 



LOUIS H. YARWOOD, proprietor of the 
Yarwood art studio, is one of the best 
artists in this part of the state, and is also a 
teacher in landscape and scenic painting. 
For almost half a century he has made his 
home in Elgin, but he was born in the east, 
his birth occurring in Oriskany, New York, 
November 25, 1827, and his parents, Henry 
and Katie A. (Wiggins) Yarwood, were also 
natives of that state. Our subject is the 
oldest of their four children, the others be- 
ing Marcus S. , a resident of Chicago; 
Phoebe, wife of G. R. Raymond, of Du- 
buque, Iowa; and Arthur J., who was a 
Union soldier during the Civil war, and is 
now living in Wyoming. While living in 
the east the father was employed as a woolen 
manufacturer and dyer and held various 
offices. His wife, who was an Episcopalian 



in religious belief, died there at the age of 
forty-five years. In 1853 he came to Elgin, 
where he passed away at the age of fifty- 
nine years and eleven months. His father, 
Samuel Yarwood, was a native of England 
and died in New York, while the maternal 
grandfather of our subject, Benjamin 
Wiggins, was born in that state and died in 
Chicago, when about ninety-six years of 
age. His wife was only two or three years 
younger at the time of her death. 

Mr. Yarwood, whose name introduces 
this sketch, began his education in the com- 
mon schools of his native state and later 
attended the Whitestown Academy. He 
also began the study of painting when a 
child, and becoming very proficient in that 
art, he now devotes his entire attention to 
it. On his removal from New York to 
Elgin in 1851, he accepted the position of 
bookkeeper in S. N. Dexter's woolen fac- 
tory, and later conducted a drug store for 
about fifteen years. The following eight 
years were spent as librarian of the Elgin 
public library, but since then he has devoted 
his energies to painting. He has gained a 
wide reputation as an artist of superior abil- 
ity, to which he is justly entitled, his paint- 
ing being among the finest produced in this 
section of the country. 

Mr. Yarwood married Miss Caroline J. 
Drummond, and they have become the par- 
ents of three children Willard H., who 
wedded Mary Hunter and had three chil- 
dren, Bertram and Marguerite, still living, 
and Willard H., deceased; Marc D., who 
is a successful piano teacher in Elgin; and 
Katie D. , at home. The family. have a 
pleasant home at No. 373 Park street, where 
they delight to entertain their many friends. 
A stanch Republican in politics, Mr. Yar- 
wood was elected on that ticket to the posi- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tion of alderman for one term, but has 
never been a politician in the sense of office 
seeking. Socially he is identified with the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. 



ANSON C. BUCKLIN, now living a re- 
tired life in Dundee, Kane county, Illi- 
nois, was for many years a successful farmer 
and dairyman of Fox river valley. He 
dates his residence in Illinois since June, 
1837, coming here when Northern Illinois 
was a wilderness. He was born in the town 
of Adams, Berkshire county, Massachusetts, 
October 15, 1823. His father, Isaac Buck- 
lin, was born in the same town, county and 
state, and on the same farm. His grand- 
father, Jeremiah Bucklin, was born in Rhode 
Island, in 1745, and removed to Adams, 
Massachusetts, in 1767, and took up a large 
tract of wild land. He served in the war 
for American independence, and was in the 
battle of Bennington. John Bucklin, the 
great-grandfather of our subject, was also 
born in Rhode Island, in which state he was 
quite prominent. His ancestors moved to 
Rhode Island with Roger Williams. He 
also moved to Adams, Massachusetts, and 
there the last years of his life were spent. 
Jeremiah Bucklin was one of the first set- 
tlers of Adams, Massachusetts, and was a 
millwright by trade. He built the first 
flouring mill in North Adams, for Oliver 
Parker, and at South Adams built one for 
himself on the present site of the Brown 
paper mill. At that that place he reared 
his family, and for many years was recog- 
nized as one of its prominent citizens. 

Isaac Bucklin grew to manhood in Mas- 
sachusetts, and there married Miss Achsa 
Wilmarth, a native of that state, born in 
Berkshire county. His birth occurred in 



1790. They were the parents of three chil- 
dren Anson C., our subject; Olive, who 
grew to mature years, but is now deceased; 
and Jane, who married George Browning, 
also deceased. Isaac Bucklin was a fanner 
and died in his native state, in 1826. In 
1837 Mrs. Bucklin sold the old home farm, 
and, with her family, accompanied by some 
relatives, came to Illinois, by way of the 
Erie canal and the lakes to Chicago, and, 
moving farther west, located in the Fox 
river valley. She took up a claim of 
nearly three hundred acres of land, in what 
is now the township of Barrington, and also 
two hundred and forty acres on Fox river, 
which is now East Dundee. Making her home 
on the Barrington land, she built a house, 
improved the farm and there spent the last 
years of her life, dying about 1871. 

The subject of this sketch came to Illi- 
nois with his mother and family, and, a boy 
of thirteen, held, the plow which turned the 
first furrow on the place and helped develop 
the farm. He remained with his mother 
until her death, she having conveyed to him 
the old homestead. He built there a good, 
large residence, barns and other buildings, 
and made of it one of the best dairy farms 
in Fox river valley. He commenced ship- 
ping milk to Chicago in 1856, and has con- 
tinued in the dairy business since that time, 
usually having upon his place about seven- 
ty-five milch cows. In October, 1884, he 
left his son Henry on the farm and moved 
to Dundee, where he built a house and has 
since lived practically a retired life. 

Mr. Bucklin was first married, in Cook 
county, in 1844, to Miss Julia Jinks, a na- 
tive of Berkshire county, Massachusetts, 
and a daughter of Henry Jinks, a pioneer of 
Barrington township. She died October 1 5 , 
1873, leaving two children Frances, wife 



'32 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of Daniel Burks, a business man of Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota; and Henry I., a farmer 
residing on the old homestead, who was 
born December 24, 1853, and was married 
March 6, 1883, to Miss Mary Welsby, by 
whom he has three children, as follows: 
John A., born December 24, 1883; Julia I., 
born October 13, 1885; and Olive E. , born 
December 3, 1887. 

In October, 1877, our subject married 
Miss Emma Merritt, a native of New York, 
but then living in Bloomington, Illinois. 
She died about two years later, and in De- 
cember, 1880, Mr. Bucklin married Mrs. 
Emma Miner, who was born and reared 
near Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, and daugh- 
ter of Russell Mallory. 

Politically Mr. Bucklin was first identi- 
fied with the Abolition party, and on the 
organization of the Republican party be- 
came one of its stanch supporters, and in 
1856 voted for its first presidential candi- 
date, General John C. Fremont. Being 
ever a believer in temperance and the prin- 
ciple of prohibition, he has of late years 
supported the Prohibition party. He is a 
member of the Baptist church, of which 
body his wife is also a member. For sixty- 
one years he has been a resident of the Fox 
River Valley, and the changes which have 
been made in that time can hardly be con- 
ceived, even by those most active in the 
transformation. Few men are better known 
and none more highly esteemed. 



HALSEY ROSENCRANS, M. D., de- 
ceased, was for a many years a promi- 
nent and successful physician and surgeon 
of Elgin. He was born September 14, 
1818, in New Jersey, of which state his 
parents, Asa and Jane (Cole) Rosencrans 



were also natives. The father, who was a 
farmer by occupation, removed from New 
Jersey to New York, and in 1834 came to 
Kane county, Illinois, where his sons, Hor- 
ace and Frazier, had located one year before, 
being numbered among the earliest settlers 
of this section of the state. The family 
endured all the hardships and privations 
incident to pioneer life, and from the wild 
land the father developed a good farm. 

Dr. Rosencrans was the fourth in order 
of birth in a family of nine children, and 
during his boyhood and youth he assisted 
his father in the work of the farm, acquir- 
ing his literary education in the public 
schools. He accompanied his parents on 
their emigration to Illinois, studied medicine, 
and in the latter part of the '403 graduated 
from Rush Medical College. He began the 
practice of his chosen profession in Crystal 
Lake, Illinois, and later opened an office 
in Elgin. 

The Doctor was one of the '49ers, hav- 
ing crossed the plains to California during 
the great gold excitement of that year, on a 
prospecting tour. Later his brother Garrett 
also went to the Pacific coast, and after 
about a year spent there, they returned to- 
gether. Dr. Rosencrans did not engage in 
mining on account of the rough crowd with 
which he would have to associate. Locat- 
ing in Calhoun county, southwestern Texas, 
he there engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine until 1863, when he was forced to 
leave, his life being in great danger. He 
was a man of deep convictions and dared 
even in Texas to make known his sentiment. 
He was warned by his friends that he must 
go, as an attack upon him was being planned. 
The Doctor was a physician in whom the 
best people of his acquaintance put im- 
plicit confidence and he was the only 




HALSEY ROSENCRANS, M .D. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



135 



one in his community that could han- 
dle yellow fever. Many of his south- 
ern friends told him: " If ever I have yel- 
low fever, I want you to attend me, without 
reference to what it will cost or how we 
may differ in politics." His professional 
skill they admired, and they wanted his at- 
tention in case of sickness, hence he was 
permitted to remain in Texas long after 
others of his political faith were driven 
away, but finally he was forced to leave. 
Before the war he passed through two epi- 
demics of yellow fever, and at one time he 
and a priest were the only ones left to care 
for many of the poor sick and dying who 
could not get away. From Texas he went 
to New Orleans, which was then in the 
hands of the Union forces, and was soon 
afterward appointed assistant surgeon in a 
hospital. Later he was transferred to an- 
other hospital on the Brazos, and continued 
to serve as surgeon in the Union army until 
the war ended. Subsequently he returned 
to Texas and resumed practice in the com- 
munity where he had previously lived. In 
1873 he came to Elgin, but two years later, 
during the terrible yellow fever epidemic, 
he went to Indianola, Texas, feeling it his 
duty to assist in caring for those suffering 
with that dread disease. Returning to El- 
gin, he successfully engaged in practice here 
for several years. 

Dr. Rosencrans was twice married, his 
first union being with Miss Eliza Hale, by 
whom he had three children: Fannie is the 
wife of Captain Theodore Hayes, of Texas, 
and has four children Charles, Wiltsie, 
Minnie and Fannie. Captain Hayes was an 
officer in the Union army. Lizzie is the 
wife of H. H. Bilter, a farmer of Eola, 
Illinois, and has four sons Raymond, Carl, 
Eugene and Hale. Cora is the widow of 



Thomas O'Neal, by whom she had seven 
children. 

Mrs. Rosencrans died in New Orleans in 
1863. The Doctor was again married Sep- 
tember ii, 1873, his second union being 
with Miss Cynthia E. Bowen, and the mar- 
riage ceremony was performed by Professor 
C. G. Finney, president of Oberlin College, 
of which Mrs. Rosencrans is a graduate. 
She is a daughter of Lucius E. and Marga- 
ret (Dildine) Bowen, of Oberlin, Ohio, who 
now sleep side by side' in the cemetery at 
that place. Mrs. Rosencrans is a consistent 
and faithful member of the Congregational 
church of Elgin, and both she and her hus- 
band held membership in the Scientific So- 
ciety of that place. In social circles they 
also occupied an enviable position. 

In 1886 Dr. Rosencrans went to Indi- 
anola, Texas, to visit his daughter, and at 
that place was killed on the 2Oth of August 
of that year. During a storm he was in 
his office, which was located in the same 
building with the signal service office. He 
and Captain Reed, who had charge of the 
signal service, were together. The Doctor 
told him they had better leave the building 
as it was swaying and would likely be blown 
over soon, but before they could do this 
another blast came and the building fell 
burying the Doctor and his friend, who 
were instantly killed by the falling timbers. 
They were soon covered with water and it 
was some hours before their remains could 
be removed. This was on Matagorda Bay 
in the region of the terrible storms to which 
that place is frequently subjected. Dr. 
Rosencrans was an eminent physician, hav- 
ing the professional skill which comes from 
faithful study and long and successful expe- 
rience in his chosen calling. He was also 
an able writer, contributing many articles 



136 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of merit to papers and medical journals. 
Being genial and companionable, he was a 
favorite in society and wherever known was 
held in the highest regard. 



ALDEN KENDRICK WRIGHT, who 
has for many years been at the head 
of one of the departments of the Elgin 
watch factory, is a native of New Hamp- 
shire, born November 8,' 1842, in Hanover, 
of which place his parents, Horace and 
Mary Ann (Foster) Wright, were also na- 
tives. The paternal grandfather, Asa 
Wright, was born on the old homestead at 
Hanover, which had been in the family for 
many years. The Wrights were of Scotch 
origin, and came to the new world prior to 
the Revolutionary war. The grandfather 
of our subject was a farmer by occupation, 
but the father engaged in the tanning busi- 
ness, learning his trade with his father-in- 
law, Caleb Foster, and while in his service 
he became acquainted with his future wife. 
Throughout the greater part of his life 
Horace Wright lived in Hanover, New 
Hampshire, but spent his last days in Leb- 
anon, that state, where he died October 13, 
1871. He was a Universalist in religious 
belief, and in politics was first a Whig and 
later a Republican, joining that party on its 
organization, as he had ever been an anti- 
slavery man and was connected with the 
' ' underground railroad. " He was of medium 
size, of a genial, though quiet disposition, 
and was very domestic in his tastes. Wher- 
ever known he was held in high regard, and 
was often called upon to hold different offi- 
cial positions, including those of selectman 
and tax collector. His wife, who was a 
faithful member of the Congregational 



church, also died in Lebanon, November 24, 
1872. She was a daughter of Caleb and 
Mary (Putnam) Foster, and granddaughter 
of Richard and Sarah (Greeley) Foster, the 
last named being a relative of Horace 
Greeley. 

The subject of this sketch is one of a 
family of four sons, the others being Ros- 
well F., still a resident of Lebanon, New 
Hampshire; Orin S., of Clinton, Iowa; and 
William H., of Newport, New Hampshire. 
In the common schools of Lebanon Alden 
K. Wright began his education, later attend- 
ing the Kimball Union Academy at Meridian, 
New Hampshire. When his school days 
were over he went to Haverhill, that state, 
where he served an apprenticeship to the 
watchmaker's trade, after which he was em- 
ployed for three years by the firm of E. 
Howard & Company, at Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts. While with this distinguished 
company he acquired his great skill in the 
business of watch-making. For a year and 
a half he was with the United States Watch 
Company, was with the Hampden Company 
for about the same length of time, and for 
the following three years was with the 
American Watch Company at Waltham, 
Massachusetts. 

It was in 1874 that Mr. Wright came to 
Elgin and entered the employ of the Elgin 
Watch Company, with which he has ever 
since been connected, serving at first as in- 
spector of watches. Being appointed assist- 
ant foreman, he served in that capacity for 
seventeen years, and for the past three 
years has been foreman in the finishing de- 
partment B, overseeing about two hundred 
workmen. Through his vast experience in 
every department of watch manufacture, 
he is able to preside over his department 
with great skill, as he is qualified to quickly 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



137 



detect any imperfection in the mechanism 
of the watches, which makes him a valuable 
man to the factory one of superior useful- 
ness. 

In Boston, Massachusetts, May 21, 1874, 
Mr. Wright was united in marriage with 
Miss Nannie H. White, a native of that 
city, and a daughter of Henry Kirk and 
Harriet (Thompson) White. Her mother, 
a native of Gloucester, Massachusetts, died 
in September, 1897, the father dying in 
February, 1898, at Wrentham, that state. 
Their children were: Henry K. , William 
N., Louis B. , Alice P., wife of Adelbert 
Newton, of Boston; Nannie, wife of our sub- 
ject; and Caroline, of Brooklyn, New York. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wright have three children: 
Louis W., Helen, and Arthur K. 

Mrs. Wright is a member of the Univer- 
salist church of Elgin, and Mr. Wright, who 
is a good musician, has sung nearly all his 
life in church choirs until lately. Politic- 
ally he is a supporter of the men and meas- 
ures of the Republican party, while frater- 
nally he is a prominent member of the blue 
lodge, No. 522, F. & A. M. ; Loyal Legion, 
Munn chapter, R. A. M. ; and the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. For the past 
two years he has been a member of the 
board of education in Elgin, and taking a 
deep and commendable interest in educa- 
tional matters, has made him a very active 
and efficient member. He owns a pleasant 
and commodious home on Spring street, 
where he and his family delight to entertain 
their many friends. His chief source of 
recreation is found in hunting and fishing, 
of which sports he is extremely fond. 
Though a hard worker, he believes in de- 
voting a portion of one's time to judicious 
and healthful recreation, and like most men 
who care for these sports, he is genial, gen- 



erous and kind-hearted, being very popular 
with all who have the pleasure of his 
acquaintance. 

ANSON W. ROOT, who is now practi- 
cally living retired from business cares 
at his pleasant home, No. 277 Chicago 
street, Elgin, was born December 20, 1823, 
in Genesee county, New York, a son of Dr. 
Anson and Lucinda (Wilson) Root. The 
paternal grandfather, Ephraim Root, served 
in the Colonial army during the Revolution- 
ary war, as a recruit from near Haverhill, 
New Hampshire, and as he carried a sword 
it is believed he was an officer. He spent 
his entire life in the east, dying in Gen- 
esee county, New York, when past the 
age of eighty years. By occupation he was 
a farmer. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Sally Skinner, died at the age of 
eighty-five years. The maternal grand- 
father of our subject, Amos Wilson, de- 
parted this life at the advanced age of nine- 
ty-six years. One of his sons was Judge 
Isaac Wilson, of Batavia, Illinois. 

Dr. Anson Root, our subject's father, 
was also a native of Genesee county, New 
York, and was surgeon of a regiment in the 
war of 1812, receiving for his services his 
regular pay as a surgeon and later a land 
warrant, which he located near Lake Ge- 
neva, Wisconsin. He also served as a sur- 
geon in the Canadian rebellion. In 1838 
he came west, and after spending a year on 
the Fox river he took up his residence in 
Elgin, where he made his home until called 
to his final rest in 1866, at the age of eighty 
years. For fifty years he successfully en- 
gaged in the practice of his chosen profes- 
sion, was one of the leading pioneer physi- 
cians of this section of the state, but spent his 
last years in retirement, enjoying a well- 



38 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



earned rest. He served as alderman of Elgin 
for a time and held other public positions of 
honor and trust. His wife, who was for many 
years a consistent member of the Baptist 
church, died in 1847, at the age of fifty-four 
years. In their family were eight children, 
two sons and six daughters, but only three 
are now living: Orpha, widow of Samuel 
Burdick, and a resident of Elgin; Martha, 
wife of C. H. Loomis, of Los Angeles, Cal- 
ifornia; and Anson W., of this sketch. 

On leaving the home farm at an early 
age, Mr. Root, of this review, learned the 
trade of a clothier, and for about ten years 
engaged in the manufacture of cloth, after 
which he learned the carpenter and joiner's 
trade, following it some years. For twenty 
years he was also interested in the milling 
business, and still owns a good mill prop- 
erty in Elgin, which he rents, besides a 
number of houses there and a good farm 
near Beloit, Wisconsin, deriving from these 
a good income. He also has money securi- 
ties. 

In 1846 Mr. Root led to the marriage 
altar Miss Elizabeth, daughter of William 
Himes, of Michigan, and to them was born 
a son William A., a resident of Elgin, who 
married Alda Gray, and has one child, Kate. 
The wife of our subject, who was a con- 
sistent member of the Baptist church, died 
in 1856, aged thirty-two years, and the 
same year Mr. Root married Miss Harriet 
B. Parmelee, a native of Waterloo, Canada, 
and a daughter of Rufus Parmelee. Two 
daughters blessed this union: Ida R. , wife 
of R. E. Linkfield, of Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota, by whom she has two children, Alice 
and Edith; and Alice M., wife of F. E. 
Wolcott, of Chicago, by whom she has one' 
child, Maud. 

In 1853 Mr. Root was initiated into the 



mysteries of the Odd Fellows' society, and 
with one exception is now the oldest mem- 
ber of Kane lodge, of Elgin, in which he 
has filled all the chairs, and also been rep- 
resentative to the grand lodge. He was for 
about ten years a member of the Masonic 
order. His political support has always 
been given the Republican party, but at 
present he is what is termed a silver Repub- 
lican, advocating the free coinage of silver. 
From 1847 until 1867 he made his home in 
Beloit, Wisconsin, and while there served 
as assessor eight years, alderman nine years, 
and was undersheriff and acting as deputy 
provost marshal during the Civil war, aiding 
in the capture of deserters, etc. For five 
years he also served as county superintend- 
ent of the poor, for the same length of time 
was county supervisor; and in Elgin also 
served as county supervisor five years and 
assessor three years. He is one of the 
reliable, enterprising men of the city, is 
deservedly popular with all classes of citi- 
zens, and his many estimable traits of char- 
acter have won him a host of friends. His 
wife is a consistent and active member of 
the Baptist church. 



THOMAS W. TEFFT. If one desires 
to gain a vivid realization of the rapid 
advance in civilization which the last few 
decades have brought about, he can listen 
to the stories that men who are still living 
among us, and by no means overburdened 
with years, can tell of their boyhood. The 
log cabin home, the still ruder school house 
with its rough seats made of slabs, its lim- 
ited range of studies and its brief terms, 
arranged on the subscription plan, the rou- 
tine of work at home, unrelieved by any of 
the modern devices by which machinery is 



**/l 



Of 




THOMAS W. TEFFT. 




MRS. T. W. TEFFT. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



143 



made to do in a short time what formerly 
occupied the entire year, these and many 
similar descriptions will bring up in sharp 
contrast the advantages of to-day. The 
subject of this sketch, a highly-respected 
citizen of Elgin, and the present alderman 
from the Sixth ward, has many interesting 
reminiscences of this sort. 

Mr. Tefft was born in the town of Leb- 
anon, Madison county. New York, October 
30, 1824, a son of Jonathan and Elizabeth 
(Collins) Tefft, a sketch of whom is given 
in connection with Jonathan Tefft, Jr., on 
another page of this work. In the schools 
of his native county our subject began his 
education, and after the emigration of the 
family to Kane county, Illinois, in the fall 
of 1835, he pursued his studies in the old log 
school house on Gravel Hill, on the Bos- 
worth farm, south of Elgin, and later in a 
school in the township of St. Charles until 
twenty-one years of age. 

Mr. Teft remained with his father until 
he attained his majority, aiding in the ardu- 
ous task of transforming the wild land into 
highly-cultivated fields, and then he and his 
brother Eli operated the old homestead on 
the shares for one year. Coming to Elgin 
in 1846 he worked at anything which he 
could find to do. He purchased a team of 
oxen, with which he plowed gardens for the 
villagers. In the fall he worked with a 
threshing machine, which he and his brother 
subsequently leased and operated through 
the winter. As the entire country was de- 
voted to the raising of grain at that time, 
there was much threshing to do. In the 
spring Mr. Tefft again broke prairie, some- 
times using twelve or thirteen yoke of cat- 
tle to a plow. He continued to follow these 
occupations until March, 1849, when he 
started to California in a party of six men, 



making the journey in two wagons. In May 
they crossed the Missouri river thirty miles 
above St. Joseph, and in September reached 
their destination, having avoided large par- 
ties in order to have plenty of feed for their 
cattle. Fortunately they were not troubled 
by the Indians. Mr. Tefft went direct to 
the mountains in Calaveras county, and in 
the summer of 1850 was joined by two 
brothers. He stayed in California two 
years, and always regrets that he did not 
remain there, buying land near Sacramento. 
He met with fair success in gold mining, and 
during the time when nothing else could be 
done he engaged in hunting, and sold the 
game not needed by himself and partners. 
Venison brought three shiliings'^ier pound. 

In the fall of 1851 Mr. Tefft returned to 
Elgin by way of the Isthmus, New York and 
Chicago. The following year he built a 
large brick livery stable on the west side, 
Elgin, which he owned until 1865 conduct- 
ing it for several years. He served his fel- 
low citizens as constable, policeman and 
city marshal most of the time. In 1862 he 
enlisted in Company B, Sixty-ninth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, for three months, was 
commissioned second lieutenant, and was 
stationed in Chicago. Subsequently he re- 
enlisted in the one-hundred-days' service 
with the rank of first lieutenant, and was 
stationed most of the time at Columbus, 
Kentucky, doing guard duty. 

After the war Lieutenant Tefft bought 
his brother Jonathan's farm, lying partly in 
section 36, Elgin township, Kane county, 
while part lies in Hanover township, Cook 
county, which he still owns, while his brother 
Jonathan, purchased the old homestead. 
Retiring from farm labor in 1876 our sub- 
ject purchased a residence on Chicago street, 
Elgin, where he lived until 1881, when in 



144 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



partnership with his brother, Eli, he bought 
a stone quarry at South Elgin and moved 
there to superintend the working of the 
quarry. After operating it successfully un- 
til 1884, they sold and he returned to his 
home on Chicago street, Elgin. The fol- 
lowing year, however, he purchased a thir- 
ty-five-acre farm south of the asylum, on 
which he lived for six years, selling in 1891, 
when he bought his present home at 403 
Jewett street. 

Mr. Tefft has been twice married, his 
first wife being Miss Emily B. Joles, daugh- 
ter of Spencer Joles, and to them were born 
five children: Egbert, who died at the age 
of four years; Harvey, who now lives in 
Idaho; Emma, who married Sylvester Mead, 
and has five children Wilbur, Frank, Ar- 
chie (deceased), Roy and George; they make 
their home with our subject; Albert P. and 
Bertram W. , who are also residents of 
Idaho. Mrs. Tefft died in April, 1869, and 
he subsequently married Mrs. Frances 
(Gould) Kinloch, who by her first husband 
had one son, Sanford G. Kinloch, who made 
his home with our subject until he attained 
his majority and then bought Mr. Tefft's 
thirty-five-acre farm south of the asylum. 
The second wife died May 12, 1887. 

Mr. Tefft was a charter member of Clin- 
tonville lodge, No. 511, F. & A. M., of 
which he was master for twelve years, and 
he now holds membership in Elgin Lodge, 
No. 1 1 7. Politically he is a stalwart Demo- 
crat. He has always taken an active inter- 
est in political affairs, and in the spring of 
1897 was elected alderman from the sixth 
ward a position he is now creditably and 
satisfactorily filling. He is always num- 
bered among Elgin's valued citizens, and on 
the rolls of Kane county's honored pioneers 
his name should be among the foremost. 



MALACHI CHRISTIAN GETZEL- 
MAN, of Elgin, is now living a re- 
tired life in the enjoyment of a rest which 
he has truly earned and richly deserves by 
reason of his industrious efforts of former 
years. Accomplishment and progress ever 
imply labor, energy and diligence, and it was 
those qualities that enabled our subject to 
rise from the ranks of the many and stand 
among the successful few. He is now one 
of the highly-respected citizens in Elgin, 
and his long residence in Kane county and 
the active part he has taken in its develop- 
ment well entitles him to representation in 
its history. 

Mr. Getzelman was born in Bavaria, 
Watirtzburg, Germany, January i, 1837, a 
son of Malachi and Mary (Getzelman) Get- 
zelman. His father was a mason by trade, 
and in 1848 came to the United States, 
locating in Hampshire township, Kane coun- 
ty, where he purchased forty acres of un- 
improved timber land and began the devel- 
opment of a farm, to which he added until 
at the time of his death his homestead com- 
prised one hundred and fifty acres of valua- 
ble land. In politics he was a Republican, 
and in religious belief was a Lutheran in 
early life, but later joined the Evangelical 
church. His death occurred in August, 
1862, and his wife passed away on the ist 
of August, 1882. They were parents of five 
children who reached mature years: Mi- 
chael, Jacob, Malachi, Margaret, wife of 
John Haible, of Elgin, and Henry, who 
died in Nevada about twenty years ago. 

In the land of his nativity Mr. Getzel- 
man, of this sketch, attended the public 
schools, and at the age of eleven he accom- 
panied his parents to America. He assisted 
his father in the operation of the home farm 
until after the inauguration of the Civil war, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'45 



when his loyalty to his adopted country 
prompted his enlistment, and on the ist of 
October, 1861, he joined Company K, Fifty- 
second Illinois Infantry, going into camp at 
Geneva. About the ist of November he 
went to St. Louis, thence to St. Joseph, 
Missouri, and later returned to Kentucky. 
With his command he started to Fort Don- 
elson, making forced marches, but arrived 
just too late for participation in the battle. 
His company was then sent as guard over 
the prisoners to Chicago. On their return 
to the south they participated in the battle 
of Shiloh, followed by the siege and battle 
of Corinth, and all the battles from Look- 
out Mountain to the capture of Atlanta, in- 
cluding the memorable march with Sherman 
to the sea. From Savannah they marched 
through the Carolinas, joining Grant's army 
on the march to Richmond, and on the 24th 
of May, 1865, participated in the grand re- 
view in Washington, the most celebrated 
military pageant seen in the history of this 
country. Mr. Getzelman passed through 
the war uninjured, save on one occasion, 
when he received a slight bullet wound un- 
der the arm. At that time he and several 
companions were out on a foraging expedi- 
tion, and were discovered and pursued by a 
band of Rebel cavalry. So greatly were 
they outnumbered by the boys in gray that 
they decided the best thing to be done was 
to flee, but the Rebels were well mounted 
and escape seemed almost impossible. How- 
ever, fully aware that capture meant the 
horrors of Libby and Andersonville, Mr. 
Getzelman determined to escape if he could, 
feeling that he would rather be killed than 
enter one of those southern prison pens. 
Mounted on a mule, he put the animal to 
its best possible speed, but as he reached a 
fence the mule refused to jump it, and our 



subject, then tumbling over the fence, made 
his way toward a swamp, pursued by the 
bullets of the enemy, several of which 
pierced his clothes, making him think that 
his earthly career was drawing to a close. 
However, he succeeded in reaching the 
swamp, and ultimately arrived at camp 
once more, but his companions were cap- 
tured. The next day, when his colonel 
suggested that he had better go on another 
foraging expedition, he asked to be excused! 
Mr. Getzelman was mustered out of the 
service July 6, 1865, and resumed agricult- 
ural pursuits which he successfully conduct- 
ed for many years. He purchased eighty 
acres in Hampshire township, and for six- 
teen years made his home thereon, but in 
the meantime increased the boundaries of 
his farm until it comprised seven hundred 
acres of rich land in one tract. He placed 
much of this under cultivation, made many 
excellent improvements and developed one 
of the finest farms of the county. For a 
number of years he engaged in general farm- 
ing, but later years turned his attention 
more specially to dairying. He was very 
industrious and enterprising and his well 
directed efforts, capable management and 
honorable business methods brought him a 
success which year by year added to his in- 
come until he is now the possessor of a 
very handsome competence. On leaving 
the farm he spent five years in the village of 
Hampshire and in 1893 removed to Elgin, 
where he purchased the Crosby residence on 
Highland avenue, a fine home in which he 
is now spending his declining days, sur- 
rounded by the comforts that go to make 
life worth the living. He has sold a portion 
of his old farm, but still retains the owner- 
ship of the homestead of three hundred 
acres, which he rents. He also has a farm 



146 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of three hundred and sixty acres in Dundee 
township and considerable city realty. All 
has been acquired through his own efforts 
and his property is a splendid indication of 
his busy and useful life. 

Mr. Getzleman was married in Chicago, 
September 4, 1865, to Ernestine Rudolph, 
a daughter of George and Eva (Eichler) 
Rudolph, natives of Germany. Mrs. Get- 
zelman was born in Saxony, and by her mar- 
riage has become the mother of the follow- 
ing children: Emma, wife of Israel Reams, 
of Hampshire; Lydia May, wife of Charles 
J. Smith, of Elgin, who was born in Marine, 
Illinois, a son of Erasmus and Louisa 
(Bright) Smith, the former a native of 
Baden and the latter of Saxony, Germany. 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith were married June I, 
1878, and have one child, Ernest Theodore 
E., who has received a liberal education 
and is now a member of the class of 1898 
in one of the Chicago law colleges. He is 
married. Benjamin C. , who is married and 
living in Elgin, is a graduate pharmacist, 
but now occupies the position of bookkeeper 
in the Elgin National Bank. Edna and 
George died in infancy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Getzelman are members 
of the Christian Evangelical church and are 
people of the highest respectability, whose 
many excellencies of character have gained 
them the warm regard of all with whom 
they have come in contact. In politics he 
is a stanch Republican and is a valued mem- 
ber of Elgin Post, G. A. R. He is a director 
in the Elgin National Bank, and has ever 
taken a very active interest in the develop- 
ment and progress of the community, doing 
all in his power for the promotion of its 
business, political, educational and moral 
interests. While in Hampshire he served 
as a member of the school board. He is as 



true to the duties of citizenship in times of 
peace as he was when following the starry 
banner on southern battle fields, and his life 
record is one well worthy of emulation. 



EDWARD H. ABBOTT. M. D., is en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgery in Elgin, his office being at 157 Chi- 
cago street. In a few short years his devo- 
tion to his profession has won him a place 
among the ablest representatives of the 
medical fraternity in this locality. 

Dr. Abbott was born in Elgin, in the old 
Adams house on Villa street November 6, 
1866, being the first child born to Frank 
W. Abbott and his wife, Dora L. (Helm) 
Abbott, the former a native of New York, 
the latter of Hanover, Germany. The pa- 
ternal grandfather, Hiram Abbott, was an 
American of Scotch descent, and his wife, 
Jennette Robinson, was a descendant of the 
Rev. Jedediah Hibbard, a hymn writer and 
Baptist minister of early New England 
times and a minute man in the Revolution. 
Hiram Abbott was a merchant of Cayuga 
county, New York, and died before reaching 
the age of fifty years, leaving one son and 
two daughters. 

Otto and Fredericka (Berling) Helm, 
the Doctor's maternal grandparents, were 
natives of Germany, who coming to America 
early in 1850, located upon and developed 
a small farm in Barrington township, Cook 
county, Illinois. There Otto Helm died in 
middle life, while his wife surviving him, 
reached the age of seventy-two years. In 
their family were three sons and one 
daughter. 

During his youth Frank W. Abbott first 
came to Elgin about 1856, but later traveled 
through the Rocky Mountain states and 




E. H. ABBOTT, M. D, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



149 



into Mexico, returning in 1861 to enlist as 
drummer in Company I, Illinois Volunter 
Infantry. After serving three years he re- 
enlisted and remained at the front until the 
close of the war, participating in the battles 
of Donelson, Shiloh, Siege of Corinth, luka, 
Corinth, Hatchie, Town Creek, Bear Creek, 
Resaca, Snake Creek Gap, Day's Ferry, 
Rowe Cross Roads, Dallas, Calhoun Cross 
Roads, Mills Grove, Kenesaw, Decatur, 
Atlanta, Lovejoy's Station, Jonesboro, Al- 
toona, Bentonville, Sherman's march to the 
sea, and Savannah. After the war he 
entered the Elgin National Watch Works, 
where he was acting as job foreman at the 
time of his death, which occurred May 7, 
1882, when he was forty-two years of age. 
He was an active member of the famous 
Elgin Military band for years. Fraternally 
he was a Master Mason, and politically a 
Republican. His widow still survives and 
with her children lives at No. 358 Yarwood 
street. Besides the Doctor there are two 
daughters Catherine L. , who is first assist- 
ant in the Gail Borden Public Library; and 
Jennette E., who is employed in one of the 
offices of the National Watch factory. 

Dr. Abbott was handicapped in early life 
by the loss of his father, and at an early 
age, fourteen years, he took his father's 
place as the family mainstay. Beginning 
in the watch factory on his father's job, he 
worked his way upward, succeeding in every- 
thing he undertook. Thrown into the so- 
ciety of mechanics he developed an inter- 
est in that direction and mastered me- 
chanical drawing and mathematics in several 
years of night work. Then turning to liter- 
ature and science he continued his night 
work, being in this his own tutor. During 
the same time he took an active part in local 
athletic circles, also edited the watch factory 



department of the Elgin ' ' Every Saturday " 
for three years, acted as secretary of Kane 
lodge, No. 47, I. O. O. F., for the same 
length of time, and passed through the 
chairs in that lodge. In 1888 he helped or- 
ganize the Republican Tinners' Campaign 
companies, acting as chairman in the meet- 
ings of the organization. Beginning the 
study of medicine several years before leav- 
ing the watch factory, he entered Rush 
Medical College, Chicago, with a year of 
work to his credit and graduated from that 
institution in the spring of 1895. Soon after 
locating in Elgin, Dr. Abbott undertook the 
treatment of a severe case of burning of the 
limbs and body of a young lady of Elgin. 
The case was pronounced a hopeless one, 
the patient being at death's _door. After 
faithful preparation .hundreds of skin grafts 
were placed upon the denuded flesh'with 
complete success, the young woman regain- 
ing her health with the restoration of the 
destroyed cuticle. The case was a record 
one of its kind, the surface grafted (two 
square feet) being one of the greatest ever 
reported to the medical profession. Chicago 
and St. Louis papers devoted much space 
to the operation, while nearly every paper 
in the middle states mentioned it. This 
case established the Doctor's reputation, 
and has been followed by others which gained 
him an enviable standing in his profession. 
Dr. Abbott was recently elected a mem- 
ber of the Fox River Valley Medical Asso- 
ciation and of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation; takes an active part in the Odd 
Fellows, Independent Order of Forresters, 
Knights of the Maccabees, Mystic Workers 
of the World, Royal Circle, and the Sons of 
Veterans. In the latter organization he 
holds the State of Illinois Supreme Sur- 
geoncy upon the commander's staff. He is 



i jo 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



also medical director of the Sons of Veter- 
ans' Life Association, the insurance branch 
of the order, and is a member of the Carle- 
ton Club. 

In November, 1895, he purchased a half 
interest in the drug business at 1 59 Chicago 
street with C. F. Wm. Schultz & Com- 
pany. The business has since been con- 
ducted with gratifying success, Mr. Schultz 
being a skilled pharmacist, a graduate of the 
Chicago School of Pharmacy, the phar- 
maceutical department of the University of 
Illinois. The aim of this firm is to keep 
only the best and choicest of drugs and 
druggists' sundries. 

Politically the Doctor is an Independent 
Republican, and takes a commendable in- 
terest in public affairs. He is a whole- 
souled, genial gentleman of a literary turn 
of mind, having contributed a number 
of articles for the local and general press. 
Being yet young, his promise for future 
eminence is flattering. 



/~>EORGE BAKER, fence manufacturer 
\-J and dealer in fencing material, Hamp- 
shire, was born near Mansfield, Seneca 
county, Ohio, June 9, 1845. His father, 
Peter Baker, was born near Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, and his mother dying when 
he was about five years of age, he was 
taken and reared by an uncle, who lived 
near Green Springs, Ohio. In early life he 
learned the shoemaker's trade, at which he 
worked for many years, and at odd times 
after his removal to Hampshire township. 
Samuel Baker, the paternal grandfather, 
moved to Ohio, some years after his son 
Peter iwent to live with his uncle. He 
died there about 1858, at the age of eighty 
years. The Bakers are of German origin, 



the first of the name settling in this coun- 
try in colonial days. Peter Baker married 
Magdalena Cook, a native of Richland 
county, Ohio, and a daughter of John 
George Cook, who left Europe after the 
Napoleonic wars. To them were born 
seven children as follows: Sarah Ann, 
wife of Abraham Aurand, residing in Hamp- 
shire township; George, our subject; Ja- 
cob, living in Hampshire township; John, 
residing near the village of Hampshire; 
William, in Hampshire township; Harri- 
son, living in Sandusky county, Ohio; and 
Lydia, wife of Chris Bowman, of Hamp- 
shire township. 

In November, 1845, Peter Baker came 
with his family to Kane county, Illinois, 
and located on a farm a few miles north- 
east of the present village of Hampshire. 
He came by wagon, and was three months 
in making the trip. While camping on the 
bank of a river one evening, the father 
went to get wood and the mother to get 
water. Our subject, then but about six 
months old, was left under the wagon. 
When the mother returned, she found the 
little one had rolled nearly into the river. 
The place selected by Mr. Baker was in 
the heavy timber, which had to be cleared 
for cultivation. A log house was first 
erected and later a substantial frame 
house was built. Here the father followed 
farming until his death, in December, 1867, 
at the age of forty- seven years. The mother 
remained in possession of the farm, until 
her death, November 25, 1894, at the age 
of seventy-five years. Peter Baker was a 
very industrious man, and in bad weather 
and at night worked at his trade of shoe- 
making, and thus acquired money to pay 
for his farm. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Hampshire township, and attended the dis- 
trict schools until the age of seventeen years. 
He remained upon the home farm, however, 
until November 17, 1864, when he enlisted 
in Company B, Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry, 
under command of Captain C. H. Shopleigh, 
and was mustered into the service at St. 
Charles, and was immediately sent to Jeffer- 
son Barracks, near St. Louis, where the 
regiment was detained for some months. 
It was then sent to Lexington, Missouri, 
where it engaged in battle with the Rebels, 
after which it was sent to Macon City, 
guarding prisoners. They returned to Illi- 
nois in charge of the prisoners, which were 
left at Alton, and the regiment was then 
sent to Kansas, west of Fort Scott, thence 
to Verdegris river, in the Indian country, 
and in guarding the stage route in Smoky 
Hill Valley. When near Salt Lake City, 
our subject and a companion were cut off 
from the troop by Indians, and the two 
fought for several hours, when relief came. 
Our subject was shot in the leg and was 
sent to the hospital at Fort Bennett, thence 
to Fort Leavenworth, where he was mus- 
tered out and discharged from hospital, 
January 10, 1866, and was sent to the 
soldiers' home, where he remained until 
February 22, 1866, and then sent to Spring- 
field, and from there home. 

On his return home Mr. Baker began 
working on a farm for Mr. Rudolph, and, 
not yet being of age, his father took his 
wages, amounting to one hundred and fifty 
dollars, much to his sorrow. In the sum- 
mer of 1867, he worked for M. J. Getzel- 
man, for twenty-one dollars and fifty cents 
per month, and in the summer of 1868 for 
Samuel Gift. In 1869, he worked for Eber- 
hardt Wertwein, and in the fall of that 
year went to Ohio, expecting to make a 



visit of a few weeks. Arriving there he 
went to work for an uncle, with whom he 
remained two years. On the 7th of Decem- 
ber, 1871, in Thompson township, Seneca 
county, Ohio, he married Caroline Deuch- 
ler, third in a family, of eleven children, 
born in Alsace, France, in 1845, and who 
came with her parents to America in 1851, 
sailing in April from Havre, France, land- 
ing at New York, in June, being forty-two 
days on the water. Her father, Peter 
Deuchler, married Elizabeth Long, a daugh- 
ter of Peter Long, a soldier under Napo- 
leon. Peter Deuchler was killed by a run- 
away team, in 1872, at the age of seventy- 
two years. His wife survived him some 
years, dying at the age of sixty- seven years. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Baker four children have 
been born, as follows: Albert W., an em- 
ploye in the tile factory, at Hampshire; 
Samuel R., a telegraph operator at New 
Lebanon, Illinois; Ida May and Lillie Annie, 
at home. 

After his marriage, Mr. Baker rented a 
farm in Seneca county, Ohio, where he re- 
mained one year and then spent four years 
on a farm in Sandusky county, Ohio. In 
1876 he returned to Kane county, rented a 
house and worked for Lucien Baldwin for 
one year, and then rented his father's old 
farm for four years. Shortly afterwards he 
bought his present place at the edge of the 
village of Hampshire, and built his residence. 
For two years he worked in the tile factory 
and at painting for four years. In 1883, 
he began his present business, and now 
manufactures several varieties of fencing and 
is also agent for several lines of patent fenc- 
ing. He has erected many miles of fencing 
in Hampshire and adjoining townships. 
During the season in which fence building 
is dull he canvasses for Bibles and religious 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



books, and in a single year he has sold two 
hundred Bibles, and distributed two thou- 
sand Christian tracts. He and his family 
are all members of the Evangelical church. 
Fraternally he is a member of Hampshire 
post, G. A. R. , and in politics is a Repub- 
lican. 

FRANCIS BURTON, an honored pioneer 
of Kane county, who is now living re- 
tired in Elgin, was born in Sherrington, 
near Montreal, Canada East, December 14, 
1829, a son of John and Jane (Stringer) 
Burton, natives of Yorkshire, England, who 
emigrated to Canada about 1815, and were 
married in Montreal. The father, who was 
a farmer by occupation, enlisted as a volun- 
teer in the French war, and was killed in an 
engagement at Odeltown, in 1838. His 
wife died in Kane county, Illinois, in 1866, 
a worthy member of the Episcopal church, 
to which the father also belonged. To them 
were born nine children, as follows: Will- 
iam, Richard, Mary, the wife of George 
Marshall, of South Elgin; John, Francis, 
George, who died at the age of seven years; 
Alice, widow of George Church; and Ann, 
wife of George Cookman. 

Reared in Canada, Francis Burton ob- 
tained his education in the public schools of 
that country, and upon the home farm he 
early became familiar with every depart- 
ment of farm work. Coming to the United 
States in 1845, he located in Kane county, 
Illinois, where his brothers, William, Rich- 
ard and John, had previously taken up their 
residence. In 1850, before he had attained 
his majority, he made his first purchase 
of land, it being a tract of ninety-six acres 
in Plato township, which he leased. In 
1852 he had " an attack of the gold fever," 
and, with his brother Richard, crossed the 



plains to California, where he engaged in 
mining for about six months with reasona- 
ble success, operating principally on Weaver 
creek. On his return to Illinois he worked 
in a distillery at Clintonville for a time, and 
then operated a farm, which he rented of 
his uncle. At the end of that time he pur- 
chased eighty acres in Elgin township, Kane 
county, to the cultivation and improvement 
of which he at once turned his attention. 
Subsequently he bought another eighty-acre 
tract adjoining, which he afterward sold to 
the original owner, John Springer, and later 
purchased fifty acres in Plato township, 
which he operated for a few years. On 
selling that place he bought one hundred 
and seventeen acres adjoining it on the east. 
This place, together with his first eighty- 
acre farm, he still owns, and he successfully 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1884, 
when he leased his land to his son-in-law 
and removed to Elgin, where he has since 
practically lived retired in the enjoyment of 
the accumulations of former years. In con- 
nection with general farming, he devoted a 
great deal of his time to stock raising and 
dairying, and his farm is now chiefly a dairy 
farm. 

On the 6th of September, 1853, Mr. 
Burton was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Poole, a native of England, and a 
daughter of Charles Poole. Nine children 
blessed this union, namely: Charles R. , a 
resident of Kingston, Illinois; Adeline M., 
wife of George Wright, of Elgin ; George F., 
a butter maker living in Mount Carroll, Illi- 
nois; Fenny, wife of Charles Ladd, living 
near Iowa Falls, Iowa; Olive; William L., 
who lives on his father's farm at Iowa Falls; 
Frank, a carpenter of Elgin; and Lottie and 
Minnie, who died in childhood. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Burton is 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



153 



a pronounced Republican, and he has most 
acceptably served in a number of township 
offices. He and his wife are both consistent 
members of the United Brethren church, 
and are held in high regard by all who know 
them on account of their sterling worth and 
many virtues. 

FRED W. JENCKS, the present efficient 
alderman from the second ward, is one 
of the leading and most popular business 
men of Elgin, where he is interested in a 
number of different enterprises. Although 
a comparatively young man, he has done 
much to promote the commercial activity, 
advance the general welfare and secure the 
material development of the city. 

A native of Kane county, Mr. Jencks was 
born in Dundee, July 6, 1861, and is a son 
of Dennison and Elizabeth (Hollister) 
Jencks, the former a native of North Adams, 
Massachusetts, the latter of Danbury, Con- 
necticut. The father came to Illinois in 
1841, is one of the oldest residents of the 
county, making his home in Dundee for 
many years. Since 1872, however, he has 
resided in Elgin, where for over twenty 
years he was successfully engaged in the in- 
surance business, but is now living retired 
at the age of sixty. A public-spirited, en- 
terprising citizen, he has always taken a 
commendable interest in public affairs; for 
three terms he served his fellow citizens as 
county supervisor, alderman of Elgin four- 
teen years, and postmaster at Dundee for 
eight years. Religiously Mrs. Jencks was 
identified with the Baptist church. She 
was called to her final rest January 18, 
1897, at the age of fifty-six years. 

Fred W. Jencks, the only child of this 
worthy couple, by adoption, has been a 
resident of Elgin since ten years of age, his 



parents removing from Dundee to this city 
at that time, and in the academy he com- 
pleted his literary education. In 1877 he 
became interested with his father in the in- 
surance business, and now represents some 
of the most reliable firms in the United 
States, besides others of foreign countries. 
These include the Royal Fire, of England; 
the Girard, of Philadelphia; the ^Etna, of 
Hartford, Connecticut; the Glens Falls, of 
New York; the Traders, of Chicago; the 
Imperial, of London, England; the St. Paul, 
of Minnesota; the American Central, of St. 
Louis; and the Scottish Union & National, 
of Scotland. He does the most extensive 
business of any firm of the kind in Elgin. 
He is also serving as a notary public, is a 
licensed city bill poster and distributor, is 
interested in the real-estate business, and 
for the past eleven years has been the effi- 
cient and popular manager of the Elgin 
Opera House, of Elgin, which has prospered 
under his charge. 

On the 1 7th of June, 1883, Mr. Jencks 
was married to Miss Lizzie, daughter of 
Andrew Schaller, and they now have one 
child, Mabel V. Fraternally is a member of 
the Modern Woodmen of America, and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while 
politically he is identified with the Repub- 
lican party. In 1895 ne was elected alder- 
man from the second ward, receiving the 
largest majority of any candidate on the 
ticket, a fact which plainly indicates his 
popularity, and the confidence and trust re- 
posed in him by his fellow citizens. He 
has been a member of some of the most 
important committees, and has been chair- 
man of the fire and water committee during 
his entire incumbency. He has exerted his 
influence in behalf of the best interests of 
the city, and that his services are appre- 



154 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ciated is evinced by his continuous re-elec- 
tion. For the past five years he has been 
president of the Illinois State Bill Posters 
Association. 

HANS JOHNSON, a farmer residing in 
the village of Hampshire, is a native 
of Denmark, born in Husby, November u, 
1845. He there attended the Lutheran 
parochial school until the age of fourteen, 
when he commenced work on a farm, and 
later was employed as foreman of a large 
farm belonging to the minister of their 
church, which position he retained for three 
years. For three years he was in the Dan- 
ish army, serving from 1868 to 1870, inclu- 
sive. He was a corporal in the artillery 
service. At the time of the Franco-Prus- 
sian war he was again called into active 
service, and assisted in guarding the frontier. 
In the fall of 1872 he came to America. 
He left Denmark September 27, for Hull, 
England, and encountered a severe storm 
on the North sea, being driven back to 
Scaggen on the Danish coast. He sailed 
from Liverpool, England, October 10, 1872, 
and landed at Quebec on the 22d of the 
same month. From Quebec he went to 
Luddington, Michigan, where he worked 
eight months, and then went to Grand 
Haven, in the same state, where he was 
employed two months. From Grand Haven 
he went to Chicago, and secured work on 
the Baltimore & Ohio railroad in Indiana. 
Receiving no money for his labor, he re- 
turned to Chicago and began work for the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad. 
Later he secured work in Plato township, 
Kane county, on the farm of Ira Russell, 
where he remained four and a half years, 
then rented a part of the Russell land. A 
sister came from Denmark to keep house 



for him, and on her marriage some months 
later he sold the stock and farm implements 
and took charge of a farm for a widow lady 
east of Elgin. He ran that farm for two 
years, when on the 28th of March, 1883, 
he was united in marriage with Mise Reka 
Dahl, and to them have been born six chil- 
dren Lizzie, Ella, Charles, Katherine, 
Grace and Florence. 

After his marriage Mr. Johnson went to 
Pingree Grove, rented the farm of L. N. 
Kelly, comprising five hundred and twenty 
acres, foriwhich he paid a cash rent of seven 
thousand, five hundred dollars for the five 
years. In the fall of 1890 he bought his 
present farm of one hundred and fifty acres, 
which lies partly in the village of Hamp- 
shire, and which is well improved, having 
on it a good frame house, a large basement 
barn 36x80 feet, with twenty-four-foot 
posts, a windmill eighty feet high, the place 
being well drained with three thousand feet 
of tiling. The farm is used for dairy pur- 
poses, and Mr. Johnson keeps from forty to 
fifty head of cows, the milk from which he 
ships to Chicago. 

Hans Johnson, Sr. , the father of our 
subject, married Kern Jansen, who was also 
a native of Denmark. He was a laborer in 
Denmark and came to America, but not be- 
ing able to adapt himself to the customs of 
the country, became dissatisfied and returned 
to his native land, where his death occurred 
in 1 88 1, when about sixty-eight years of 
age. Of his sfx children, all came to Amer- 
ica and here made their homes. 

In 1892 an exciting and almost fatal ac- 
cident occurred to our subject. He was 
filling his barn with hay, when the fork de- 
scended unexpectedly, piercing through his 
clothing and grazing his flesh. It was a 
rather too close call for comfort. Relig- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



155 



iously, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church of Hamp- 
shire. Fraternally, he is a Master Mason 
and a member of the Eastern Star, of which 
his wife is also a member; also a member of 
the Royal Neighbors, of the Knights of the 
Maccabees, Modern Woodmen of America 
and Knights of the Globe. In politics he is 
a Republican. 



FRED ROEHL, of Dundee, Illinois, has 
been a resident of Kane county since 
the spring of 1854. He is a native of Prus- 
sia, born August 14, 1832, and is the son of 
Charles and Louisa (Kroll) Roehl, also na- 
tives of that country. His father was a 
sailor, owner and captain of several ves- 
sels and followed the sea the greater part 
of his life. When Fred was but seven 
years of age his mother died, leaving three 
children. In his boyhood he had good 
common-school advantages, but learned the 
English language after coming to this coun- 
try. While yet residing in his native land, 
he learned the stone and brick mason trade 
in a most thorough manner. In 1854 ne 
came to United States, and for a few 
months worked on a farm near Dundee. 
In 1855, he formed a partnership with Mr. 
Parker, a mason, and engaged in contract- 
ing and building with him about seven 
years. There are in Dundee a large num- 
ber of business and dwelling houses, which 
show the architectural skill and handiwork 
of Mr. Roehl. 

In 1863 Mr. Roehl engaged in the saloon 
and hotel business on the east side in Dun- 
dee, in which he continued about three 
years, when he sold out and moved to West 
Dundee and there engaged in the grocery, 
butcher and saloon business for some seven 



years, building up a large and profitable 
trade. He then sold out and returned to 
East Dundee, started a hardware store, 
and also again engaging in building and 
contracting, erecting four business houses. 
He likewise carried on a saloon and butcher 
shop, but after two years sold out the hard- 
ware store, but continued in the other 
lines of business three years longer. Sell- 
ing out his saloon and butcher shop, he 
started a lumber yard and engaged in that 
business about five years. Selling the lum- 
ber business he opened a wood and coal 
yard in Elgin, which he continued some 
four or five years, since which time he has 
been dealing in milch cows and stock. 

Mr. Roehl was married at Dundee, July 
25, 1857, to Louisa Haasa, a daughter of 
Henry Haasa, and a native of Hanover, 
Germany, where she was reared and edu- 
cated. She came to this country in 1854 
with her parents, who first settled in Elm- 
hurst, but later move to a farm near Bar- 
rington Centre. By this union nine children 
have been born, four of whom are living, 
the remainder dying in childhood. The 
living are Charles, now residing in Iowa; 
Carrie, wife of Joseph Johnson, a resident 
of Algonquin, Illinois; Louisa, wife of Will- 
iam Hagel, a business man of Chicago; 
and Frank, engaged in the butcher busi- 
ness, as junior partner of the firm of Smith 
& Roehl. 

Politically, Mr. Roehl is a Democrat, 
with which party he has been identified 
since becoming a naturalized citizen. He 
has held several local offices of honor and 
trust, serving first as constable for four 
years, and, though again elected, declined 
the office. He also served as trustee of the 
town on the west side and chairman of the 
board on the east side. In every position 



1 5 6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



he has discharged his duties faithfully and 
well. Religiously, he and his wife are 
members of the Lutheran church, one of 
its charter members in Dundee. In the 
erection of their house of worship, in Dun- 
dee, he contributed liberally of his time 
and money. 

For forty-four years Mr. Roehl has been 
identified with the business interests of 
Dundee. He has built for himself in this 
time some fifteen business houses and resi- 
dences in addition to those erected for other 
people. He has probably done as much as 
any one man toward improving and develop- 
ing his adopted city. Numbered among the 
old settlers of the place, he enjoys the con- 
fidence and respect of all. 



WILLIAM MARSHALL, proprietor of 
the Railroad avenue farm, on section 
19, St. Charles township, is admitted to be 
one of the best farmers in the township, and 
the man who is well regarded by the com- 
munity in general. He was born in North 
Clifton, on the banks of the river Trent, 
Nottinghamshire, England, April 21, 1821. 
His father, William Marshall, Sr. , was also 
a native of the same shire, where he married 
Mary Bingham, a native of Lincolnshire, 
England, by whom he had eleven children, 
five sons and six daughters, all of whom 
grew to mature years, save one son. 

William Marshall, our subject, was reared 
in Nottinghamshire, England, and in his 
boyhood received a very limited education. 
In his youth he was apprenticed for a term 
of seven years to learn the blacksmith trade, 
his only compensation being his board dur- 
ing that time. After completing his trade 
he worked as a journeyman in Nottingham- 
shire and Lancastershire, and had the repu- 



tation of being one of the best mechanics in 
the vicinity. On the 2$th of March, 1843, 
in Nottinghamshire, he married Miss Sarah 
Harpham, a native of Headon, near shire- 
town of Retford, Nottinghamshire, and 
three years later, with his wife, he set sail 
for America, taking ship at Liverpool, April 
22, 1848, and landed in New York, May 24, 
1848, being thirty-two days in making the 
trip, during which time they encountered 
some severe weather. From New York he 
went up the Hudson river to Albany, and 
by the Erie Canal and the Great Lakes to 
Chicago, where he worked for a few days 
for the McCormick company, and then 
came to St. Charles, started a shop, and 
worked at his trade for about four years. 

Believing he could better himself, Mr. 
Marshall sold his shop and rented a farm 
for two years, and then purchased seventy- 
six acres of the farm on which he now re- 
sides. The farm was partially improved, 
having on it a log house with a stone chim- 
ney, and shake roof. He lived in that 
house until he had made considerable im- 
provements in the place, when he erected a 
neat and substantial house, that was burned 
down May 21, 1894. He then built his 
present residence, which is a frame, with 
pressed brick veneer and stone. This is a 
fine residence, and one of the best in the 
township. Mr. Marshall has also upon the 
place five barns, and other outbuildings, of 
the most substantial character. From time 
to time he added to his additional purchase, 
until he had three hundred acres of as fine 
land as could be desired, but he has since 
sold one hundred and ten acres, leaving him 
one hundred and ninety acres in his present 
farm. In addition to this farm he owns a 
valuable four-acre tract and several lots in 
St. Charles, as well as a number of lots in 




MR. AND MRS. WM. MARSHALL. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1,5 9 



Chicago, Aurora, Evergreen Park and else- 
where. 

Some five years after Mr. Marshall lo- 
cated in St. Charles township, he was joined 
by his father, and later his brothers and sis- 
ters came to this country. The parents and 
youngest son remained with our subject for 
about one year and then removed to De- 
Kalb county, where they spent the remain- 
ing years of their life, the father dying at 
the age of about ninety, while the mother 
was ninty-four years old at the time of her 
death. Thomas Marshall, their youngest 
son, remained with them until their death, 
when he succeeded to the property which 
they had accumulated, and is now one of 
wealthy men of De Kalb county. All the 
brothers and sisters started in life without a 
dollar and now all are wealthy and influen- 
tial. Three of the sisters married three 
brothers, Edward, John and William Law- 
rence, and became wealthy. 

After a long and happy married life, Mr. 
Marshall was deprived of his wife, her death 
taking place February 14, 1895, leaving five 
children Jane, wife of Richmond Cook, 
who was a farmer of Kane county, and is 
now deceased, by whom she had six chil- 
dren; Mary Ann, wife of Joseph Kirk, of 
St. Charles township, Kane county, by 
whom she -has ten children; Elizabeth, wife 
of Charles T. Shaver, whose farm adjoins 
that of Mr. Marshall; they have one child; 
Addie Eliza, wife of Truman Albee, of El- 
gin, a machinist in the watch factory, by 
whom she had two children; and William 
Henry, a farmer of St. Charles township. 
Three children died in infancy and one at 
the age of three years. 

On the i gth of May, 1897, Mr. Mar- 
shall was again married, his second union 
being with Mrs. Mary L. Templeton, of 



Chicago, widow of Rev. John G. Temple- 
ton, who held a position with Marshall 
Field & Company, of Chicago. His brother, 
Thomas Templeton, is a partner in that 
firm. Mrs. Marshall was born in Collins- 
ville, Marquette county, Michigan. Her fa- 
ther, Azel Lathrop, was a pioneer of that 
county, in which there is a town named 
for him. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall have two 
children (twins), Marcus Fletcher and 
George Lathrop, born February 28, 1898. 
By her first husband, Mrs. Marshall has 
three children Thomas Templeton, who 
holds a position with Orr & Lockett, Chi- 
cago; Robert Templeton, a student in the 
seminary at Evansville, Wisconsin; and 
Mary Templeton. a student in the home 
school. 

Politically, Mr. Marshall was formerly a 
Republican, but for some years has been 
identified with the Prohibition party. He 
is a member of the Free Methodist church, 
with which he has been identified for thirty- 
eight years. He was one of the original 
members of the organization in his neigh- 
borhood. For fifty years he has been a 
resident of Kane county, and, although he 
came a poor man, by industry and economy 
he has accumulated a competency, and is 
enabled to take life easy. His friends are 
many throughout the county, and no man is 
held in higher esteem. 



ABRAHAM LEATHERMAN, an hon- 
JT\ ored veteran of the Civil war now liv- 
ing retired in the city of Elgin, is a native 
of Illinois, born in the town of Hanover, 
Cook county, December 21, 1840, and is a 
worthy representative of one of the highly 
respected pioneer families of this section of 
the state. His father, Abraham Leather- 



i6o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



man, ST., was born in Kentucky, October 
25, 1 80 1, and was reared in Louisville. 
The paternal grandfather was only seven- 
teen years old at the outbreak of the Rev- 
olutionary war, but he joined the Conti- 
nental army and served all through that 
terrible struggle, returning home to find that 
the other members of the family had all 
been killed, probably by the Indians. 

At the age of eighteen years Abraham 
Leatherman, Sr. , left his native state and 
removed to Greencastle, Putnam county, 
Indiana, where he engaged in farming until 
taking up his residence in Hanover, Cook 
county, Illinois, on the 2Oth of October, 
1835. Here he pre-empted four hundred 
acres of land which he later purchased when 
it came into market, and to the cultivation 
and improvement of the place he devoted 
his time and attention until 1865, when he 
sold it. This place was known as Leather- 
man's Hill, and the famous hostelry which 
he kept was known as Leatherman's Inn. 
Retiring from active business life in 1866, 
he purchased a small tract of land known 
as the John Hill farm and there made his 
home until coming to Elgin in 1885. Here 
he built a house adjoining that of our sub- 
ject, where he died February 1 6, 1889. He 
was a large man, standing six feet in his 
stockings, was of a genial temperament and 
was devoted to his family. In political sen- 
timent he was a Democrat, and in religious 
belief was a Baptist. 

Abraham Leatherman, Sr. , was married 
at the age of twenty-one years to Miss Mary 
Duese, who was born in Indiana January 
1 8, 1803, a daughter of David Duese, and 
died February 18, 1889, being laid to rest 
by the side of her husband in the old cem- 
tery at Elgin. She, too, was a faithful 
member of the Baptist church. Nine chil- 



dren were born to this worthy couple: (i) 
William, born January 7, 1823, enlisted 
August 12, 1862, in Company I, One Hun- 
dren and Thirteenth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, for service in the Civil war, and died 
of smallpox while at Camp Butler January 
28, 1863. (2) David, born October 25, 
1824, was a farmer by occupation, but is 
now living retired in Kansas. (3) Sarah, 
born October 26, 1826, married David 
Longley, and makes her home in Chickasaw 
county, Iowa. (4) Frederick, born Novem- 
ber 5, 1828, was one of the " Forty-niners," 
and died in California, supposed to have 
been murdered for his money in 1852. (5) 
Jane, born November 23, 1830, is the wife 
of Seth Stowell, who lived for some years 
near Spring Brook, Illinois, but is now re- 
siding in Nebraska. (6) John, born Janu- 
ary 7, 1833, was also one of the boys in 
blue during the Civil war, enlisting August 
12, 1862, in Company F, One Hundred and 
Thirteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He 
was taken prisoner in June, 1864, when in 
the campaign again:;t Price, and was con- 
fined for nine months in Andersonville prison, 
being released after the surrender of Gen- 
eral Lee. He is now a retired farmer, liv- 
ing in Watseka, Illinois, but also owns a 
place in Louisiana, where he spends the 
winter months. (7) Elizabeth, born July 
9, 1835, is the wife of Joseph R. McChesney, 
of Glen Ellyn, DuPage county, Illinois. 
(8) Evan, born December 3, 1837, was also 
a Union soldier, having enlisted in the spring 
of 1865 in the One Hundred and Forty-first 
Illinois Infantry, and is now a farmer living 
in Watseka, Iroquois county, Illinois. (9) 
Abraham, Jr., of this review, is the young- 
est of the family. 

Reared in Hanover, Cook county, the 
subject of this sketch attended the common 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



161 



schools during his boyhood and youth, and 
when not in the school room, assisted his 
father in the labors of the farm. Respond- 
ing to his country's call for aid, he enlisted 
August 12, 1 86 1, in Company F, One Hun- 
dred and Thirteenth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, and was mustered in at Chicago. 
From there the regiment proceeded to 
Memphis, Tennessee, and Mr. Leatherman 
took part in all the marches and battles in 
which it took part, including the Tallahassee 
expedition, the Vicksburg campaign and the 
Arkansas expedition. He was selected as 
one of the guard to the prisoners brought 
from Arkansas to Camp Butler, where he 
remained on duty for about a year, going to 
Memphis in the spring of 1863. He was 
then under General Sturges in the campaign 
against Price, and was next with his regi- 
ment detailed to guard the railroads around 
Memphis, being thus engaged when the war 
ended. He was mustered out at that place, 
and discharged at Chicago, June 29, 1865, 
being at that time a member of what was 
known as the Third Board of Trade Regi- 
ment of Chicago. After his return home, 
Mr. Leatherman successfully engaged in 
farming and dairying, purchasing one hun- 
dred and eighty acres of the old John Hill 
tract. There he carried on operations in a 
most profitable manner until 1883, when he 
came to Elgin and took up his residence at 
the corner of Porter avenue and Park street, 
in a house which he had erected for his 
home. He leases his farm, and is now en- 
joying that ease and retirement which 
should always follow a useful and honor- 
able career. 

On the I3thof June, 1867, Mr. Leather- 
man was united in marriage with Miss Jos- 
ephine A. McChesney, born in Chicago, and 
a daughter of James H. and Mary Brown 



(Hull) McChesney, who were born in New 
York City, and are now living in Adams 
county, Wisconsin. They have eight chil- 
dren living, namely: Josephine, Mary and 
Jarnes, deceased, Margaret, Jane, Samuel, 
Joseph, John, deceased, and James, Mark 
and Myrtle. To Mr. and Mrs. Lealherman 
have been born the following named chil- 
dren: William O., born April 15, 1868, died 
September 20, of that year; Jesse T. , born 
July 8, 1872, died September 13, 1872; 
Foneta M. M., born June 10, 1875, ' s now 
the wife of Edward Hunt, of Hanover, Illi- 
nois; Ida D., born July 18, 1880, and May 
E., born May 12, 1888, are both at home. 
The parents are both consistent members of 
the Congregational church, and are widely 
and favorably known. Politically Mr. Leath- 
erman is identified with the Republican 
party, and socially affiliates with Elgin post, 
No. 49, G. A. R. His efforts in life have 
been crowned with success, so that he now 
enjoys a handsome competence, and his 
career has ever been such as to win for him 
the respect and confidence of all who know 
him. 

JOHN RADLOFF, of Dundee, is a na- 
tive of Germany, born in Mechlenberg, 
August 25, 1839. He there grew to man- 
hood and received a good education in the 
German language, attending school about 
seven years. He was reared on a farm and 
remained with his father until nineteen years 
of age, when he began life for himself, work- 
ing at various occupations in his native coun- 
try for about six years. He was united in 
marriage at Mechlenberg, in 1863, with Miss 
Mary Schroeder, a daughter of Frank 
Schroeder, also a native of Germany. 

With that laudable desire to better him- 
self, Mr. Radloff determined to emigrate to 



1 62 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the United States, and in 1865, accompanied 
by his young wife, he crossed the Atlantic, 
landing in New York city, from which place 
he came directly to Illinois, locating in 
Huntly, McHenry county, where he joined 
some of his relatives who had preceded him 
to the new world. He first worked on the 
railroad at that place, in and around the 
depot, and was content to do anything hon- 
orable which he could find to do. In 1868, 
he rented a farm near Huntly and engaged 
in farming and dairying. In 1877 he pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and fifty-one 
acres near Barrington, Cook county, to 
which he removed, and on which he con- 
tinued to reside for nineteen years. In 1896 
he rented the farm, built a residence on 
First street, Dundee, into which he moved 
with his family and has since lived a retired 
life. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Radloff seven children 
have been born: Sophia, wife of Charles 
Young, of McHenry county; Rachel, wife of 
Fred Rousch, of Starks Station, Illinois; 
Fred, a farmer residing on the old home- 
stead; Caroline, wife of William Miller, of 
McHenry county; Mary, wife of Fred Miller, 
residing in Cook county; Bertha, wife of 
Burton Chapman, watch inspector in the 
Elgin factory; and Louis, who is assisting 
his brother on the farm. 

Politically Mr. Radloff is a stanch Re- 
publican and believer in protection and 
reciprocity. His first presidential ballot 
was cast for U. S. Grant in 1872. For 
about fifteen years Mr. Radloff served as a 
member of the school board and as overseer 
of highways about seventeen years, making 
a faithful and efficient officer. For some 
years he was an official of the Farmers' In- 
surance Company of Barrington township, 
and was one of its appraisers for six years. 



Religiously he is a member of the Lutheran 
church and is one of its active members, 
having served as deacon in the same for 
some years. His wife and children are also 
members of the same body, and all take an 
active interest in the work of the church. 

Mr. Radloff has been a resident of Illi- 
nois about thirty-three years. He came 
here a poor man, but by his industrious 
habits he has acquired a fair share of this 
world's goods, has seen his family well pro- 
vided and is now enjoying a well earned 
rest. 

GEN. JOHN SHULER WILCOX, of 
Elgin, is one of the best known men 
in Kane county, and one highly honored by 
all. He comes of a brave and patriotic 
family, whose deeds are a part of the great 
record of our country's history. His ances- 
try is traced back to William Wilcockson, 
who came to this country in 1635, as shown 
by the following taken from the New Eng- 
land Historic Genealogical Register, Vol. 
XIV., part 4, page 304: 

"2dAprilis, 1635. Theis underwritten 
names are to be transported to New Eng- 
land, imbarqued in the Planter, Nico Tra- 
rice. Master: William Wilcockson (lynen 
weaver), age 34; Margaret Wilcockson, age 
24; Jo Wilcockson, age 2." 

It will thus be seen that the name was 
originally Wilcockson. In due time it was 
changed to Wilcox. William Wilcockson 
settled first at Windsor and afterward re- 
moved to Stratford, Connecticut. His 
fourth child, Samuel, settled at Simsbury, 
Connecticut, where his first son, also named 
Samuel, was born April 15, 1666. The 
eighth child of the second Samuel was 
named Ephraim, and was born February 4, 
1707. He married Hannah Hill, of Sims- 




GEN. J. S. WILCOX. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



165 



bury, Connecticut. They were the parents 
of Silvanus Wilcox, who was born at Sims- 
bury, November 14, 1735, and married 
Christine Curtis, a daughter of Peter Curtis, 
of that place. A few years later he moved 
with his family to Nine Partners, Dutchess 
county, New York, where he remained 
some years, and then went to Alford, Mass- 
achusetts, where, in 1768, he purchased a 
farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits. 

In the first town meeting held in Alford, 
in '775. Silvanus Wilcox was elected con- 
stable and collector of taxes, and the same 
year was elected one of the selectmen of 
the town, which office he held five terms. 
The trouble with Great Britain had com- 
menced, and Mr. Wilcox was appointed 
one of a committee of safety. A little later 
a company was raised for military service, 
and he was elected captain. In the cam- 
paign of 1775-76 it took an active part, 
and in September, 1777, the company joined 
the regiment of Col. John Asjley, and 
marched to Saratoga, where they partici- 
pated in the capture of Burgoyne. After a 
long struggle the war for independence was 
brought to a successful termination, and 
Captain Wilcox retired to his farm to enjoy 
the blessings of peace and pursuits of agri- 
culture. After residing on his farm in Al- 
ford for nearly thirty years, he sold it and 
removed to the Greenland tract, where he 
resided until his death. 

Silvanus Wilcox, Jr., the son of the 
Revolutionary hero, was born in Al- 
ford, Massachusetts, May 26, 1762. He 
married, and in April, 1787, moved with 
his wife and daughter to Schoharie Creek, 
New York, where he and his wife are buried, 
their graves being enclosed with a stone 
wall, a plain marble slab marking their rest- 
ing place, with his name inscribed " General 



Silvanus Wilcox." He attained the rank of 
general in the New York State Militia. His 
son, Elijah Wilcox, was born in Montgom- 
ery county, New York, May 10, 1791. He 
there married Sally Shuler, also a native of 
New York, and was recognized as one of the 
leading citizens of Fultonville, that state, 
where he lived for many years. In the State 
Militia he rose to the rank of brigadier- 
general, and in the civil service of his town 
and county served in several local positions. 
In May, 1842, he came to Kane county, 
Illinois, and located on a farm two and a 
half miles northwest of Elgin, where his 
last days were passed. The farm, known 
as the Wilcox homestead, is now owned by 
Judge Silvanus Wilcox, the eldest son. To 
Elijah and Sally Wilcox ten children were 
born, as follows: Amelia A., who" married 
John Hill; John S., who died at the age of 
sixteen years; Silvanus, who married Jane 
Mallory; Rensselaer, who died in infancy; 
Daniel S. , who married Sarah Ballard; Cal- 
vin E., who married Emily Larkin; Edward 
Sanford, who married Sarah Clarke, and 
later Cordelia Peck Alston, sister of George 
M. Peck; Hannah M., wife of Charles 
R. Collin; John Shuler, our subject; Will- 
am H., who wedded Mary A. Green, and 
after her death Mrs. Helen Green. Of these, 
four are living in Elgin: Silvanus, Mrs. 
Collin, John S. and William H. 

Elijah Wilcox was in politics a Demo- 
crat, in religion a Universalist. In 1846 
he was elected to the Illinois State senate 
and served four years, with credit to him- 
self and constituents. When the Civil war 
commenced he warmly espoused the Union 
cause; and did much in the way: of encour- 
agement to the men who left for the front. 
He was foremost in educational and agri- 
cultural movements, and always labored for 



1 66 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the progress and advancement of the com- 
munity and the state, and departed this life 
holding the esteem of all who knew him. 
He died December 1 1, 1862, while his good 
wife survived him many years, dying April 
4, 1882. She was a devoted member of 
the Congregational church. With his three 
sons he received honorable mention in 
Moses' History of Illinois. 

John Shuler Wilcox, ninth child of Gen- 
eral Elijah and Sally (Shuler) Wilcox, was 
born March 18, 1833, at Fultonville, Mont- 
gomery county, New York, and with the 
family came to Elgin, Kane county, Illinois, 
in May, 1842, where they located on the 
old homestead now the property of his 
eldest brother, Judge Silvanus Wilcox. 
When he was a boy he drove the breaking 
team of seven yoke of oxen to a great plow 
turning with each furrow twenty-seven 
inches of wild prairie sod, clean cut and as 
straight as a ribbon. The log cabin with 
shake roof, puncheon floor, wooden latch 
and thong latch string were familiar realities. 
The lurid gleam of prairie fires against the 
dark horizon of night was a common sight, 
and the howl of prairie wolves at daybreak 
and evening was often heard. Wolves and 
deer were abundant, sand hill cranes, wild 
geese and ducks abounded. Prairie chickens 
and quails covered the prairies, and vast 
flocks of wild pigeons darkened the sky in 
their annual migrations. The songs of the 
brown thrush, robin, oriole, cat bird, lark, 
bobolink and other birds filled grove and 
prairie with music. Myriads of wild flowers 
bloomed from every spring until late 
autumn, and it was indeed a beautiful and 
fertile land. In the winter of 1842-3 the 
lands came into market and it was a busy 
and anxious time with the early settlers, 
adjusting their claim lines to the govern- 



ment surveys, and securing title to their 
lands. 

Mr. Wilcox's boyhood was spent on the 
farm, and in 1851 he was employed a few 
months in a store in Union, McHenry 
county, Illinois. Going to Galesburg in 
1852, he attended school there for about a 
year and a half, at what is now Lombard 
University. Returning to Elgin he studied, 
law in the office of his brother, Hon. S. 
Wilcox, and was admitted to the bar in 
1855. That winter, as president of the 
Young Men's Association, he introduced to 
Elgin audiences such eminent men as 
Wendell Phillips, Elihu Burritt, John G. 
Saxe, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Bayard Tay- 
lor, etc., in a course of brilliant lectures 
rarely equaled. He was also a member of 
the Elgin Library Association. 

On September 3, 1856, Mr. Wilcox 
married Miss Lois A. Conger, at Galesburg, 
and in 1858 they built their first house, now 
No. 456 Douglas avenue, Elgin, where they 
have since resided. It has ever been an 
ideal home to their family, and the center 
of a most generous and genial hospitality. 
Six children have been born to them, name- 
ly: Dwight Conger; John Hill; Gertrude; 
Marie, now Mrs. Robert Fuller Fitz, of 
Boston, Massachusetts; Frank Conger; and 
Marguerite. Frank C. and Gertrude died 
in infancy, and John H. in 1892. 

About 1856 a military company was or- 
ganized in Elgin, of which Mr. Wilcox was 
a lieutenant, and for two years the " Con- 
tinentals " under the drill and discipline of 
the lamented Col. E. E. Ellsworth, who 
was killed at Alexandria, Virginia, early in 
the war, was the crack military company of 
northern Illinois. In 1855 Mr. Wilcox 
opened an office in Elgin and soon acquired 
a good clientage, and a fair reputation as a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



167 



popular speaker and rising young lawyer. 
Upon the president's first call for troops he 
at once began arranging his business, pre- 
paratory to enlisting. 

In August, 1 86 1, Mr. Wilcox became a 
member of a military company and was 
chosen its captain. It became Company 
K, Fifty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
and upon the organization of the regiment 
he was chosen its lieutenant-colonel, was 
subsequently promoted to the colonelcy, 
and by the president was commissioned 
brevet brigadier general of volunteers. 
He served with his regiment in its cam- 
paigns, marches and battles until the spring 
of 1864 when he resigned. At request of 
the governor and adjutant-general of the 
state, he commanded the camp of organiza- 
tion of the One Hundred and Forty-first 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and practically 
gave the summer and fall to the enlistment 
and organization of troops and the political 
campaign resulting in the second election of 
Mr. Lincoln to the presidency. 

Mr. Wilcox then resumed his law prac- 
tice with flattering success although greatly 
handicapped by an impaired hearing, re- 
sulting from injury received at the battle of 
Corinth, Mississippi. In 1865 he became 
one of the original incorporators of the First 
National Bank, serving over twelve years 
as a director, and for a time vice-president 
of the bank. In 1869, with others, he in- 
corporated the Elgin. City Banking Com- 
pany, the first savings bank in Elgin, and 
served about ten years as one of its officers. 
In 1866 he was elected and served one term 
as mayor of the city. He served a number 
of years on the public library board, and 
while its president had the Elgin library 
designated by the congressman of this dis- 
trict to receive all public documents issued 



by the government, including the unique 
and very costly war records of both the Fed- 
eral and Confederate governments. He 
served several years as director and as pres- 
ident of the Elgin Agricultural Society. For 
over a quarter of a century he has been a 
member of the board of trustees of Elgin 
Academy, and several years its president. 
From 1843 to 1854 his father was a mem- 
ber of the same board. 

Up to 1871 Elgin had but one railway, 
and the excessive charges for passengers 
and freight were exasperating. The charges 
on a box of tea or upon a piano were heav- 
ier from Chicago to Elgin than from New 
York to Chicago. Committees, of which 
General Wilcox was a member, were sent 
by meetings of citizens at various times to 
confer with the railway authorities, hoping 
for favorable concessions, but failing to ob- 
tain relief, the movement took form in the 
organization of the Chicago & Pacific Rail- 
way Company, in 1871, and he became a 
member of its board of directors and its 
general solicitor. They constructed its road 
to Byron, Illinois, on the west bank of the 
Rock river, where it succumbed to the com- 
bined opposition of the Illinois Central, the 
Chicago & Northwestern, and the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul railroads, and failed, 
its property passing by lease to the last 
named road, which has since extended the 
line and completed the road, giving the peo- 
ple the benefit of frequent and convenient 
trains at liberal rates, with a prompt and 
generous service in all respects. Mr. Wil- 
cox lost a comfortable fortune and over six 
years of hard service in this enterprise, but 
has had the satisfaction of knowing it has 
resulted in immeasurable good to his fellow 
townsmen and to a large section of the 
country along its line. 



1 68 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



In 1877 Mr. Wilcox was appointed post- 
master of Elgin, having by reason of his 
deafness abandoned his chosen profession. 
In 1882 he embarked in the fuel trade and 
warehouse business, and is now dealing in 
coal, wood, sewer pipe, etc. He was one 
of the incorporators of the Elgin Loan & 
Homestead Association, and was for five 
years on its board of directors. He out- 
lined the organization of the Elgin Patriotic 
Memorial Association, and prepared its arti- 
cles of incorporation. He is a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, but under 
stipulation that his comrades shall not ask 
him to take any office, though he has served 
as representative to both state and national 
encampments a number of times; been on 
staff of the commander-in-chief; and is now 
representing the department of Illinois on 
the committee "in charge of patriotic exer- 
cises in public schools," by appointment of 
the commander-in-chief. On every "Me- 
morial day he is called upon to address the 
people, and at the schools and at patriotic 
assemblages he is a frequent speaker. He 
is a member of the military order of the 
Loyal Legion, and of the Society of the 
Army of the Tennessee. 

General Wilcox's views are broad and 
kindly; he loves every church and Christian 
work. He is a devoted Universalist, and 
has been an active member and officer of 
the parish since its organization. For twen- 
ty-five consecutive years he was superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school. He has ever 
been a stanch friend of the Elgin Woman's 
Club, of which his estimable wife was one 
of its inc rporators and its president during 
the first eight years of its work, which in- 
cluded the appropriation of over twenty-two 
hundred dollars in aid of the Elgin Academy 
and the erection of the Sherman hospital. 



He transmitted the money contributed by 
the generous people to famine-stricken Ire- 
land, and to the sufferers in Armenia. In- 
deed it would be difficult to recall any gen- 
erous movement in aid of education, charity 
or patriotism, of which he has not been an 
active factor. 

DR. JAMES McELROY, a well-known 
veterinary surgeon residing at the cor- 
ner of Brook street and Jefferson avenue, 
Elgin, has made his home in Kane county 
for fifty-four years, arriving in pioneer days. 
Elgin, which is now a great manufacturing 
city and railroad center, was at that time 
only a srnajl. station on the stage line be- 
tween Galena, Rockford, Hazel Green and 
Dubuque, and the greater part of the coun- 
try round about was still in its primitive 
condition. The difference between the past 
and the present can scarcely be realized, 
even by those who were active participants 
in the development of the county. The 
present generation can have no conception 
of what was required by the early settlers in 
transforming the wilderness into a well set- 
tled and highly cultivated county. 

Dr. McElroy was born in the eastern 
part of Ireland, December 3, 1814, a son 
of Tarame and Elizabeth (Cody) McElroy, 
and in his native land acquired his literary 
education and also studied pharmacy in 
Dublin, graduating in 1836. He has since 
successfully engaged in the practice of vet- 
terinary surgery. On coming to the new 
world in 1840, he first located in Albany, 
New York, from there removed to Schen- 
ectady, later to Syracuse, that state, and 
then was for three years with Mr. Howlet, 
coming with him to the west to buy horses. 
Since 1844 Elgin has been his home and 
post office address, although he has spent 




JAMES MCELROY. 




MRS. JAMES MCELROY. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



173 



some time at other places, being in the em- 
ploy of Frink & Walker, and Moore & 
Davis, in Milwaukee, for eight years. 

In 1840 Dr. McElroy was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Elizabeth Smith, who was 
born December 17, 1816, and departed this 
life January 27, 1894, at the age of seventy- 
eight years. Six children were born to 
them, five sons and ope daughter, namely: 
Tarrence, who was married and died at the 
age of thirty-six years; John, who was mar- 
ried and died at the age of thirty -two; Ed- 
ward, who for the past five years has been 
engaged in buying horses for the United 
States government; James, a conductor on 
the Iron Mountain railroad, at Texarkana, 
Texas; and Mary Elizabeth, who is now 
her father's companion and housekeeper. 

Although eighty-four years of age Dr. 
McElroy appears much younger as he is still 
able to attend to his professional duties; his 
eyesight is undimmed, and his natural force 
of character unabated. Nature deals kindly 
with those who disobey not her laws, and 
the Doctor attributes his good health to the 
important fact that he has always been tem- 
perate in all things, dissipation of every 
kind having been studiously avoided. He 
possesses many of the admirable character- 
istics of the Irish race, being of a genial, 
jovial disposition, fond of wit and humor, 
and generous almost to a fault. Courteous 
and companionable, he has made many 
warm friends in his adopted country and 
has the respect of all who know him. 



BENJAMIN COX, now living a retired life 
at No. 418 Mountain street, Elgin, traces 
his ancestry back to John Cox, who came 
to America long prior to the Revolutionary 
war, accompanied by two brothers, Thomas 

8 



and William Cox, each of them locating in 
New York city or state. John Cox married 
Elizabeth Palmer, and they became the 
parents of the following named children: 
John, William, Jamieson, Thomas, George, 
Clark, Henry, Joseph and Stephen, and a 
daughter, Elizabeth. 

David Cox, Sr., the paternal grandfather 
of our subject, was born in New York city, 
October 9, 1767. He married Judith Corn- 
ing, of Beverly, Massachusetts, who was 
born October 2, 1767. In early life he fol- 
lowed the sea, but later located on a farm 
at Wilmot, New Hampshire, where his 
death occurred at an advanced age. In 
their family were three sons and three 
daughters David, John, Benjamin, Judith, 
Betsy, who died in infancy, and Betsy the 
second. . 

David Cox, Jr., was born October 21, 
1790, at Beverly, Massachusetts, and at 
Wilmot, New Hampshire, married Lydia 
Bean, by whom he had three children, two 
now living Benjamin, our subject, and 
Lydia, now the wife of D. O. Carter, of 
Painesville, Ohio. Eliza, the deceased, was 
the wife of Horace French. Early in the 
present century he moved west, locating in 
Mantua, Portage county, Ohio, where he 
died in 1838, in the forty-eighth, year of his 
age. His wife survived him until May 10, 
1877, dying at the age of eighty-one years. 
They were both members of the old-school 
Baptist church. After the death of her hus- 
band Mrs. Cox married again, her second 
husband being Enoch Colby, of Concord, 
Ohio, where he died. During the war of 
1812 David Cox, Jr., was called out as a 
soldier to help defend Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, but as the British did not land, 
his regiment was disbanded. 

The maternal grandfather of our subject, 



174 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Jeremiah Bean, was a native of Salisbury, 
New Hampshire, and by occupation was a 
farmer. He married Mehitable Garland, 
also of Salisbury, New Hampshire, by whom 
he had a large family. In the war of 1812 
he served his country against the British, 
and was wounded in the ankle at the battle 
of Plattsburg. He died at an advanced age. 

Benjamin Cox, of whom we now write, 
was born in Wilrnot, New Hampshire, De- 
cember 28, 1819, and is the son of David 
Cox, Jr., and Lydia (Bean) Cox. He was 
reared on his father's farm in New Hamp- 
shire until sixteen years old, assisting in the 
farm labor when old enough to work, and 
attending the district schools three months 
in winter and three in the summer each 
year. He then accompanied his parents to 
Ohio, where he continued to assist in farm 
work until the death of his father, when he 
learned the manufacture of women's shoes 
at Lynn, Massachusetts. 

On the igth of July, 1841, he married 
Miss Susan Bell, daughter of James and 
Betsey (Spangler) Bell. By this union were 
four children Jennie C. , Helen E., Jay M. 
and Charles B. Jennie C. married C. Mor- 
ris Jennings, and they have one daughter 
and one son, Mildred and Benjamin. They 
reside in Union, Illinois. Helen E. mar- 
ried Samuel Monroe, by whom she has two 
children, Ella and Frank E. Her home is 
in Elgin. Jay M. died at the age of twen- 
ty-one. Charles B. lives in Juarez, Mexico, 
where he is trainmaster for the Mexican 
Central railway. He married at Turner 
Junction, now West Chicago, Illinois, Mary 
Alice Trull, and they have three children, 
Clara B. , Helen E. and Benjamin Trull. 
Mrs. Susan Cox died July 8, 1884, aged 
sixty-one years and twenty-four days. She 
was a devout member of the Methodist 



church, and died in the full assurance of 
faith. 

For his second wife, in June, 1885, Mr. 
Cox married Mrs. Esther (Gardner) Marsh, 
widow of Mason M. Marsh, and daughter of 
Dwight and Cynthia (White) Gardner, na- 
tives of Massachusetts, who removed to 
New York in childhood and were there mar- 
ried. A brother of Mrs. Cox, Dwight Fos- 
ter Gardner, now resides on the old home- 
stead on which his father and grandfather 
lived and died. Her marriage with Mason 
M. Marsh was celebrated in Madison coun- 
ty, New York, in 1857. He came first to 
Elgin in 1850, where his death occurred. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cox now reside in a large and 
comfortable home, No. 418 Mountain street, 
which was erected by him in 1870. In his 
religious belief Mr. Cox is a Universalist. 

In 1842 Mr. Cox left his Ohio home on 
a prospecting tour. Believing that in Illi- 
nois the opportunity for advancement was 
greater than in the place where he then re- 
sided, he came to this state, and being 
favorably impressed with Kane county, pur- 
chased a claim of one hundred and twenty- 
three acres from another party, and subse- 
quently entered the same, paying the gov- 
ernment price of one dollar and twenty-five 
cents per acre. In the spring of 1843 he 
returned to Ohio, and in the fall of the same 
year came back with his wife and baby in a 
one-horse wagon. On that farm, which 
lies two miles west of Elgin, and to which 
he later added forty-three acres, he lived 
until his removal to the city, in 1870. 

On his arrival in Kane county, Mr. Cox 
had but about ten dollars in cash, and for 
a while worked for other persons for fifty 
cents per day, husking corn, and taking his 
pay in corn. The horse with which he 
made the journey to Illinois he traded for a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



175 



yoke of oxen, with which he farmed until 
he could purchase a span of horses. As 
soon as he got his horses he commenced 
hauling his wheat and other grain to Chi- 
cago. 

Farming in Illinois, in pioneer days, was 
not an easy job. It required hard work. 
Mr. Cox was not averse to work, and toiled 
early and late, sowing and reaping. Suc- 
cess crowned his efforts, and in 1870 he was 
enabled to retire from active labor and take 
life more easily. In the meantime, as stated, 
he had increased the size of his home farm, 
and had purchased a farm of ninety-three 
acres in Union township. In addition to 
these farms and his family residence, he 
owns the house in which his daughter lives 
in Elgin. For more than half a century 
Mr. Cox has been a resident of Kane coun- 
ty. His face is a familiar one in and around 
Elgin, and few men have more loyal and 
steadfast friends. 



/CHARLES E. LEWIS, the well-known 
\-^ superintendent of the Carpentersville 
branch of the New York Condensed Milk 
Company, has occupied that position since 
the plant was established at that place in 
1888. He is a native of Sharon, Litchfield 
county, Connecticut, born September 3, 
1847. His father, Hon. Miles B. Lewis, 
was also a native of Connecticut, born in 
Bridgeport in 1811. He there grew to man- 
hood, and in 1832 moved to Sharon. His 
marriage with Miss Maria Kelsey was cele- 
brated at Milford, Connecticut. She was a 
native of that state and was a woman of 
great refinement and lovable disposition. 
There they continued to reside and reared 
their family of nine sons and one daughter. 
Of their children William S., is a retired 



business man of Chicago; M. K. , is a mer- 
chant of Duchess county, New York; Charles 
E., our subject; Eliza, who married Allan 
Brown, of Sharon, Connecticut, but who 
removed with her husband and family to 
Iowa in the spring of 1 868, where both have 
since died. 

The Lewises are of Welsh origin, three 
brothers coming from Wales at a very early 
day, one locating in New York, another in 
Pennsylvania, and the third in Connecticut. 
Miles B. Lewis is a direct descendant of the 
one who located in Connecticut. He was a 
man of more than ordinary ability and served 
two terms in the Connecticut legislature at 
the time P. T. Barnum was a member of 
that-body. His death occurred in the spring 
of 1893. His good wife yet survives, and 
is now eighty-four years of age and a well 
preserved old lady. 

The subject of this sketch remained at 
home until eighteen years of age and there 
received a good common-school education 
and learned the milkbusiness, the family be- 
ing intimate with the Bordens, pioneers in 
that business. In the Borden factory at 
Wassaic, New York, he received his first 
lessons in the milk industry. Leaving home 
he came to Kane county and began working 
on the farm of Cornell & Wilder near Elgin, 
with whom he remained about ten months, 
although he only intended working for them 
two weeks, that he might give them instruc- 
tions in the care of milk. From Cornell & 
Wilders he drifted around for quite a while 
working at anything he could find to do that 
was honorable. 

In the spring of 1869, Mr. Lewis was 
married at Elgin, Illinois, to Miss Marilla 
Reaser, a native of Kane county, and a 
daughter of Anthony Reaser, of one the 
pioneer settlers of Plato township. She re- 



1 7 6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ceived a good education in the schools of 
Elgin, and for some time previous to her 
marriage engaged in teaching. By this 
union were three children, as follows: Susan, 
now the wife of R. W. Church, who is con- 
nected with the condensed milk factory at 
Carpentersville; Ella, who is engaged in the 
millinery business at Nunda, Illinois; and 
Frank H., who holds a position in the fac- 
tory with his father. 

Soon after marriage Mr. Lewis moved 
to Crystal Lake, McHenry county, and took 
charge of the farm of S. S. Gates, where he 
remained one season. He then determined 
to go where he could get a farm of his own 
without much expense. Accordingly, in 
1870 he moved to Pottowatamie county, 
Kansas, and took up a claim of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres and at once commenced 
its improvement. In due time he had as 
fine a farm as was in the neighborhood, but 
in 1876 he sold out and returned to New 
York, locating in Wassaic, Duchess county, 
and engaged with Mr. Borden in the con- 
densed milk business at that place. He re- 
mained there until 1882 when the company 
sent him to Elgin as an operator on the 
vacuum -pans. In that position he continued 
until the erection of the factory at Carpen- 
tersville, when he received the appointment 
as its superintendent, which position he still 
continues to hold to the entire satisfaction of 
the company and its many patrons. The 
capacity of the factory has been increased 
until it is now one of the best in the coun- 
try, and to its work Mr. Lewis gives almost 
his entire time and attention. 

Since taking the superintendency of the 
factory, Mr. Lewis has purchased residence 
property in Dundee, and has now one of the 
nicest homes in the place. Politically he is a 
Republican, with which party he has been 



identified since casting his first presidential 
vote for U. S. Grant in 1868. While pre- 
ferring to have others serve in official posi- 
tions, Mr. Lewis served for three years as a 
member of the town board, with which he 
was connected on the institution of the water 
works. While on the board he was chair- 
man of the finance committee and looked 
carefully after the finances of the city. 

Fraternally Mr. Lewis is a Master Ma- 
son and also a charter member of Silver 
Leaf camp, No. 60, M. W. A. Religiously 
he and his wife are members of the Congre- 
gational church of Dundee and take a com- 
mendable interest in the work of the church 
and its various auxiliary societies. 

For a third of a century Mr. Lewis has 
been identified more or less with the inter- 
ests of Kane county, and has endeavored to 
contribute his share to its growth and de- 
velopment. He is well known throughout 
Kane and adjoining counties as a man of 
good business ability and exemplary habits, 
enjoying the confidence and respect of all, 
and it is with pleasure that he has given 
representation in the Biographical Record 
of Kane county. 



CLINTON F. IRWIN, of the firm of 
\^s Irwin & Egan, attorneys at law, Cook 
block, Elgin, enjoys an enviable reputation 
in the legal fraternity of Kane county, hav- 
ing the past eighteen years built up a prac- 
tice that many older attorneys might ear- 
nestly desire. He was born in Franklin 
Grove, Lee county, Illinois, January i, 
1854, and is a son of Henry and Ann Eliza- 
neth (McNeal) Irwin, the former born in the 
north of Ireland, and the later in Pennsyl- 
vania. Of their three children, Clinton F. 
is the only one now living. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



177 



The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
Henry, Irwin, was a native of County Antrim, 
Ireland. On coining to America he lived for 
a time in Canada, and in 1836 came to Illi- 
nois, settling in Franklin Grove, Lee county, 
where he improved a farm and there died in- 
1853, at the age of fifty-seven years. He was 
the father of three sons and nine daughters. 

The maternal grandfather, Thomas Mc- 
Neal, was a native of Bedford county, Penn- 
sylvania, of Scotch-Irish descent. By oc- 
cupation he was a farmer, following that 
calling during his entire life. He also moved 
to Illinois at an early day and settled near 
Dixon, where he died at an advanced age. 
In his family were three sons and one daugh- 
ter. His youngest son entered the army in 
defense of the Union and was killed at the 
battle of Perryville. 

Henry Irwin, Jr., was but a small child 
when he came with his parents to Canada. 
When twelve years of age he went to Lee 
county, Illinois, where he married Ann Eliza- 
beth McNeal. In 1859 he came to Kane 
county and locate'd at Maple Park, where 
he engaged in the hotel business and in run- 
ning a meat market. He died in 1880, at 
the age of fifty-four years. His wife sur- 
vived until February, 1894, dying at Elgin 
at the home of her son, at the age of sixty- 
one years. They were originally members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. Dur- 
ing the dark days of the Rebellion Henry 
Irwin enlisted as a membet of Company C, 
Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
with which he served until early in 1865, 
when he was transferred to the Twenty-first 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry Grant's old regi- 
ment which was sent to Texas. The war 
ending, he was discharged after serving two 
years and eight months. 

Clinton Fillmore Irwin was six years of 



age when his parents removed to Maple 
Park, Kane county. In the public schools 
of that village he received a common-school 
education, which was later supplemented by 
attendance at Wheaton College ,and the 
Valparaiso (Indiana) Normal. Before at- 
taining his eighteenth year he commenced 
teaching in the public schools and continued 
to be thus successfully engaged until he was 
twenty-five years old. While yet teaching 
he commenced reading law in the office of 
W. H. H. Kennedy, of Maple Park, but the 
last three years studied alone. After pass- 
ing a successful examination he was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1879, at Chicago, and 
at once commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession at Maple Park. He there continued 
until 1883, when he removed to Elgin, and, 
forming a partnership with Robert S. Egan, 
they have since engaged in active practice 
with fine success. 

Mr. Irwin was united in marriage No- 
vember 3, 1880, with Miss Julia Helen 
Egan, daughter of William and Bridget 
(Sanders) Egan. By this union four chil- 
dren have been born: William Henry Har- 
rison, Clayton Franklin, Mary Mildred and 
Clinton Francis. The second named died 
in early childhood on the 28th of June, 
1890. Religiously Mrs. Irwin is a member 
of the Catholic church. 

Mr. Irwin is a member of the Odd Fel- 
lows, Knights of Pythias, Modern Wood- 
men, Maccabees and United Workmen. 
Politically he is a Republican, the principles 
of which party were instilled into him from 
his birth, which was the year in which the 
Republican party came into existence. In 
1896 he stumped a great portion of the 
states of Illinois and Indiana, spending 
about two months in that work. He deliv- 
ered addresses at Sycamore, Batavia, Ge- 



1 7 8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



neva, Aurora, Wheaton, Hinsdale, Downer's 
Grove and various other places in Illinois. 
In Chicago he delivered four speeches, also 
at Geneva Lake, Wisconsin, La Porte, In- 
diana, and other points outside the state. 
While his professional duties have com- 
manded much of his time, he has yet served 
his township and city, first as supervisor 
from Virgil in 1881-2, and was assistant 
supervisor of Elgin in 1885. He was cor- 
poration counsel for the city of Elgin from 
May, 1895, until May, 1897, and discharged 
the responsible duties of that position in a 
most creditable manner. 

A resident of the county since 1858 and 
for eighteen years a member of the bar, 
Mr. Irwin has gone in and out among the 
people, making many friends and establish- 
ing a reputation as one of its leading attor- 
neys. Genial and affable, possessed of a 
logical mind and of rare persuasive powers, 
he is enabled to appear well before a jury 
and to exert over it a wonderful influence. 
As a citizen he has at all times the good of 
the community at heart and all his abilities 
are exerted to make the city and county of 
his adoption rank among the brightest and 
best of all composing this great common- 
wealth. 

ELON G. DOUGLASS, a prominent citi- 
zen of Elgin, now retired from active 
business cares, is one of the men who make 
old age seem the better portion of life. He 
is a very intelligent and well-informed man, 
and to those who have the pleasure of his 
acquaintance his well-stored mind and con- 
versational powers are a source of perpetual 
pleasure. 

, Mr. Douglass was born near Gorham, 
Ontario county, New York, and is a worthy 
representative of an honored old family of 



the east. His father, George Douglass, was 
a native of Connecticut, born in 1804, and 
was a son of Rev. Caleb Douglass, also a 
native of that state, whence he removed 
with his family to Ontario county, New 
York, settling near Whitesboro. He died 
at Gorham in 1835, at a very advanced age, 
being blind for the last seven years of his 
life. His father, a colonial soldier in the 
Revolutionary war, was one of three broth- 
ers who crossed the Atlantic from Scotland 
at a very early day, and who first located in 
Massachusetts, but afterward removed to 
Connecticut. One brother settled in New 
York, the other in Pennsylvania. 

. George Douglass, our subject's father, 
was unusually well educated for his time, 
and successfully engaged in teaching when 
a young man, after which he served as school 
inspector in New York for many years, while 
he followed the occupation of a farmer. In 
1856 he became a resident of Kane county, 
Illinois, and here died ten years later. In 
early life he married Miss Eliza Metcalf, 
who was born in the town of Gorham, On- 
tario county, New York, about 1809, of 
English ancestry, and who was called to 
her final rest in 1894. Her father, Irwin 
Metcalf, who died in New York at about 
the age of eighty years, was three times 
married, his first wife being the mother of 
Mrs. Douglass. 

The subject of this sketch is the second 
in order of birth in the family of four chil- 
dren, the others being as follows: Mary 
died in July, 1897; Ada, who was the wife 
of Ogden Seward, of D'ltchess county, New 
York, died in May, 1893; Ora P. enlisted 
in September, 1861, in the Union army 
during the Civil war, was wounded at the 
siege of Vicksburg, and died at Jefferson 
Barracks in June, 1863. Going to see him, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



179 



our subject wished to bring him home, and 
it is probable that he might have lived if 
permitted to come. 

Elon G. Douglass began his education in 
the public schools of his native county, sub- 
sequently attended the Canandaigua Acad- 
emy, and after his removal to Rochester, 
New York, at the age of twenty years, he 
attended the Rochester University for four 
years. Having thus obtained an excellent 
education, he successfully engaged in teach- 
ing school for several years during early 
life. In April, 1856, he became a resident 
of Kane county, and has since been identi- 
fied with its interests. By rail he and his 
father came to Chicago, thence proceeded 
to DuPage county, Illinois, Rock Island, 
and on to Iowa City, Iowa, looking for a 
suitable location, and finally decided to set- 
tle in Kane county, with which they were 
best pleased. Our subject remained in El- 
gin while the father returned for the family, 
which arrived in June, 1856. Upon section 
22, Elgin township, the father bought one 
hundred seventy-two acres of prairie land, 
and also eleven acres of timber, and with 
him the son engaged in farming until the 
father's death. On first locating here Mr. 
Douglass gave his attention principally to the 
raising of cereals adapted to this climate 
wheat, corn, oats, etc. later engaged in 
stock raising, and finally devoted his ener- 
gies to dairy farming, being thus employed 
from 1879 until 1895. Having met with a 
well -deserved success in his undertakings, 
he has now laid aside business cares, and is 
enjoying the fruits of his former toil at his 
pleasant home, at No. 636 Lillie street, 
Elgin, where he has resided since August, 
1895. 

In Rochester, New York, October 7, 
1856, Mr. Douglass married Miss Angie 



Bradbury, a native of Erie county, New 
York, and a daughter of William B. 
and Maria (Van Scoten) Bradbury. Her 
mother's people came to this country with 
the Van Rensselaers and other patrons 
from Holland. Her father, who was quite 
prominent in musical circles, was born in 
Bath, England, in 1787, a son of William 
B. Bradbury, Sr., and when three years of 
age he came to America. He was a farmer 
by occupation, and having accumulated a 
comfortable competence, he spent his last 
years in ease and retirement from active 
labor. At about the age of thirty-five he 
was married to Maria Van Scoten, by whom 
he had nine children, Mrs. Douglass being 
the fourth in order of birth. Only four are 
now living, the others being two older sisters 
and a younger brother. The father died at 
Caledonia, Livingston county, New York, 
at the age of ninety years, and Mrs. Doug- 
lass had an uncle who lived to the extreme 
old age of one hundred four. 

Two children were born to our subject 
and wife Ella and Irving but both died 
when young. Mr. Douglass' nephew, Ora 
Seward, now makes his home with them. 
He is a graduate of the Elgin Academy and 
the Chicago University, completing both 
the literary and law courses in the latter in- 
stitution, and for a time he engaged in the 
practice of his chosen profession in Ne- 
braska. He also taught in Shurtliff Col- 
lege, Upper Alton, Illinois; Elgin Academy, 
and in the Lake Forest Seminary; and is 
now taking a post-graduate course in lan- 
guages. He studied in Europe for fourteen 
months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglass are devout and 
earnest Christians, are active and promi- 
nent members of the Baptist church of El- 
gin, and take considerable interest in all 



i8o 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



kinds of church work. Mr. Douglass can 
well remember the exciting campaign of 
1840, when the Whig cry was "Tippecanoe 
and Tyler, too." He now gives his un- 
wavering support to the men and measures 
of the Republican party, but has never cared 
for political honors. He is, however, one 
of the representative and honored citizens 
of his community, having the respect and 
esteem of all who know him. 



LYSANDER STOWELL, for many years 
one of the leading agriculturists of El- 
gin township, Kane county, and one of its 
honored pioneers as well as highly respect- 
ed citizens, was born October 21, 1824, 
near Hartford, Connecticut. With his 
father, Seth Stowell, he came to Elgin 
when there was but one house standing in 
the prospective city, and with the growth and 
development of the county he was prom- 
inently identified until his death. The 
father, a cabinet maker by trade, manufact- 
ured the first organ built in St. Charles. 
He became quite well-to-do, owning a large 
tract of land three miles in extent in Elgin 
and St. Charles townships, and to each of 
his three sons, Lysander, Washington and 
Franklin, he gave a farm. 

Reared to agricultural pursuits, Lysand- 
er Stowell adopted farming as a life work, 
and in his undertakings met with excellent 
success. He died upon his farm in Elgin 
township, May 18, 1889. He was a man 
of studious habits, always a great reader, 
and was well posted on the leading questions 
and issues of the day. He was a supporter 
of the Republican party, but never cared 
for the honors or emoluments of public 
office. As a citizen and neighbor he mer- 



ited and received the high regard of the en- 
tire community. 

In 1884 Mr. Stowell was united in mar- 
riage with Mrs. Martha Knettle, widow of 
George Knettle. She was born March 16, 
1831, near Warm Springs and Randesburg, 
Pennsylvania, fifteen miles from Carlisle, 
and is the daughter of Jesse and Mary 
(Stone) Hippie, also a native of that state. 
Her maternal grandfather, Richard Stone, 
was a native of London, England, while 
her paternal grandfather, John Hippie, was 
one of five brothers who left their old home 
in Germany and together came to America 
prior to the Revolutionary war. He served 
as a farrier through a part of that struggle 
and shod a horse for General Washington. 
He was a well-to-do farmer, but on selling his 
farm received his pay in Continental mon- 
ey, which proved useless and he lost all. 
Jesse Hippie, Mrs. Stowell's father, was 
born October 1 1, 1800, and died in Geneva, 
Illinois, at the age of eighty-three or eighty- 
four years. By trade he was a tailor, but 
for some years prior to his death he lived 
retired. In his family of six children, Mrs. 
Stowell was the fourth in order of birth. 

George Knettle, Mrs. Stowell's first hus- 
band, was born near Mifflintown, Cumber- 
land county, Pennsylvania, December 18, 
1806, a son of Henry and Hannah (Walker) 
Knettle, who were born near the Delaware 
river in Bucks county, that state. His pa- 
ternal ancestors were from Wurtemburg, 
Germany, while the Walkers were of Scotch 
descent. His grandfather was George Knet- 
tle, who married a Miss Sleuker. George 
Knettle, Jr., was twice married, his first 
wife being a Miss Steward, also a native of 
Pennsylvania, by whom he has four children 
one son and three daughters. In Chica- 
go he married Miss Martha Hippie, and to 




LYSANDER STOWELL. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



183 



them were born three children: One died 
in infancy, unnamed; Lacy, deceased; and 
Grace F. Mr. Knettle was a prosperous 
business man and accumulated considerable 
property. Going to Minneapolis in 1857 
he purchased a large tract of timber land in 
"The Big Woods" west of that city, where 
he erected large sawmills and became exten- 
sively interested in the manufacture of lum- 
ber. He sustained heavy losses, however, 
through fire, and in 1868 came to Kane 
county, Illinois, where he rented a farm and 
established a cheese factory. Later he re- 
tired from active business and returned to 
Minnesota, where he died April 10, 1883, 
honored and respected by all who knew 
him. Mrs. Stovvell now makes her home 
at No. 304 Walnut street, Elgin, and is 
surrounded by a large circle of friends and 
acquaintances. 



FRANK KRAMER. Much of the civili- 
zation of the world has come from the 
Teutonic race. Continually moving west- 
ward they have taken with them the enter- 
prise and advancement of their eastern 
homes and have become valued and useful 
citizens of various localities. In this coun- 
try especially have they demonstrated their 
power to adapt themselves to new circum- 
stances, retaining at the same time their 
progressiveness and energy, and have be- 
come loyal and devoted citizens, true to the 
institutions of "the land of the free " and 
untiring in promotion of all that will prove 
of benefit to their adopted country. The 
German element in America forms an im- 
portant part of American citizenship, and of 
this class Mr. Kramer is a worthy repre- 
sentative. He is now editor and proprietor 



of the "Deutsche Zeitung,"of Elgin, and 
has made his paper an important factor in 
the public welfare of the city. 

Mr. Kramer was born in Bodenheim, 
Hessen Darmstadt, Germany, April 24, 
1838, a son of John Kramer, also a native 
of that locality, who was a son of Bernhardt 
Kramer. The father of our subject was a 
farmer and grape cultivator, and spent his 
entire life in his native land, where he died 
in 1882. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Catherine Kirchner, was a. .daughter 
of Hanry and Elizabeth (-Koegler) Kirchner, 
and her father was one of the soldiers who 
fought under the great Napoleon. She 
died in 1890. The parents of our subject 
had four children, of whom he is the sec- 
ond. The others are Henry, John and 
Elizabeth, who are still living in the Father- 
land. The sister visited Mr. Kramer in El- 
gin during the summer of 1893, and also at- 
tended the Columbian Exposition in Chi- 
cago. 

Frank Kramer was educated in the 
schools of his native land and when nineteen 
years of age bade adieu to home and friends 
and sailed for America, landing in New 
York in 1857. He spent a short period in 
Elmira, New York, then went to Chicago, 
and at Elmhurst, Illinois, took up his resi- 
dence. He worked there as a farm hand 
for a time and then went to the lumber 
woods of Wisconsin, after which he returned 
to Elgin and again secured work on a farm. 

Later he located in the city of Elgin, 
where he learned the cooper's trade, which 
he followed five years in Elgin and Chicago. 
Returning to Elgin, he entered the employ 
of Dr. H. K. Whitford, with whom he re- 
mained six years, looking after the Doctor's 
collections and other business interests. 
He then engaged in the dray business on 



1 84 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



his own account, and was thus engaged un- 
til 1880, when he established the Elgin 
"Deutsche Zeitung," which he has since 
published with good success. He has en- 
larged it from a six-column quarto to a six- 
column five-leaf paper, and now has a large 
circulation among the German population of 
this section of the state. Its political sup- 
port has ever been given the Democratic 
party, and it strongly advocates the free 
silver and other planks of that platform. 
However, at local elections, where no na- 
tional issue is involved, it upholds the best 
man regardless of party affiliations. Its 
circulation is now the largest of any Ger- 
man weekly paper in the county. The 
paper is a neat and attractive sheet, devot- 
ed to the best interests of the community, 
and to the advancement of the sons of the 
fatherland. Its editorials are interesting, 
just and progressive, and the "Zeitung" is 
a popular visitor in many homes. 

Mr. Kramer has not always been a 
Democrat. In ante bellum days he was an 
abolitionist. He voted for Lincoln and in 
1868 for Grant, but in 1872 supported 
Horace Greeley and has been a Democrat 
since that time. In 1878 he was elected as 
an independent candidate to the office of 
town collector and filled that position in a 
most creditable way. From 1888 to 1891 
he represented the first ward of Elgin in the 
city council and was chairman of the finance 
committee. In 1897 he was appointed by 
Mayor Price, park commissioner for a term 
of three years and has ever proved a capable 
and faithful public officer. He owns con- 
siderable real estate, having made judicious 
investments in various parts of the city. 

On the 26th of October, 1860, Mr. 
Kramer married Miss Carrie H., born in 
Chicago September 8, 1840, daughter of 



Joseph and Mary (Atzel) Markel, natives of 
Alsace and Loraine, Germany, respectively. 
They died in Hanover township, Cook 
county, Illinois. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kramer are the parents of 
the following named children: John F., who is 
now in the express business and also deals in 
coal and wood ; Henry J. , a ranchman of Cus- 
ter county, Montana; Katherine E. ,a gradu- 
ate of the Elgin high school, who was for three 
terms deputy town collector and for seven 
years a deputy in the county treasurer's 
office during the busy season; Martha M., a 
graduate of the high school, who married 
Ed Dolph, of Chicago, and has one child, 
Alvin; Mamie A., a graduate of the high 
school and of a short hand and typewriting 
course, in Kimball's College, Chicago, who 
died February 9, 1896; Carolyn H., who 
attended the high school and Drews Busi- 
ness College; Rutherford B., a graduate of 
the Elgin Academy and now a student in 
the law department of the University of 
Michigan at Ann Arbor; William M. and 
N. Elsie, who are now students in the pub- 
lic schools of Elgin. 

Mr. Kramer is president of the Elgin 
German Benevolent Society, the oldest or- 
ganization of the kind in the county, and at 
intervals has served as its president for 
twelve years. The family attend the First 
Baptist church. Mr. Kramer belongs to 
that class of men whom the world terms 
self-made, for coming to this country empty- 
handed, he has conquered all obstacles in 
the path to success, and has not only se- 
cured for himself a handsome competence, 
but by his efforts has materally advanced 
the interests of the community with which 
he is associated. He is a prominent figure 
in business, political and social circles and 
ranks among the leading citizens of Kane 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



185 



county. Mr. Kramer has twice visited his 
old home in Germany, once in 1881 and 
again in 1891. 



EDWARD S. ENO, superintendent of 
the Elgin branch of the New York 
Condensed Milk Company, Elgin, Illinois, 
is one of the best known and highly esteemed 
citizens of the place. He traces his ances- 
try back to James Eno, who was of French 
extraction, but who came to this country 
from England in 1648, locating in Windsor, 
Connecticut. A sword said to have been 
brought by him from England has passed 
from father to eldest son from that day to 
this, and is now in possession of John S. 
Eno, of Brewster, New York. 

Samuel Eno, the great-great-grandfather 
of our subject, was the father of Daniel 
Eno, who married Chloe Mills, December 
23, 1809, by whom he had six children 
Charlotte, Esther, Erastus S. , Emeline E., 
Daniel Mills and Aurelia E. 

Daniel Mills Eno was born October 28, 
1812, in Connecticut, where he grew to 
manhood, and was there married March 30, 
1836, to Eunice C. Sage, a native of the 
same state, born in 1813. Later he moved 
to Wayne county, Pennsylvania, where he 
engaged in farming until his death, which 
occurred December 25, 1891. He was a 
good man, a member and deacon in the 
Presbyterian church for many years, and 
from time to time held a number of minor 
official positions. His wife, who was also a 
member of the same religious body, is yet 
living, an honored resident of Seeleyville, 
Pennsylvania. They were the parents of 
ten children, eight of whom are yet living. 
In order of birth they are as follows: (i) 
John S., a resident of Brewster, New York, 



married Susan Clark and had five children- 
Clark, Emma, Frank, Daniel (deceased) 
and Susan. (2) Eunice is the wife of John 
E. Woodward and is the mother of two 
children Anna M. and Alfred. (3) Susan 
is the widow of John K. Jenkins and had 
nine children Frederick W. (deceased), 
Mary, Benjamin, Laura, Martha, Susan, 
John K. , Gail and Grace. (4) Laura is the 
wife of Eben H. Clark and has five chil- 
dren Elizabeth, Herbert, Edward, Bertha 
and Daniel. (5) Edward S. , our subject, 
is the next of the family. (6) George died 
in infancy. (7) Alfred W. married Rose 
Miller and has two children Daniel and 
Helen. (8) Fred K. died in infancy. (9) 
Lillie G. is at home. (10) Charlotte E. is 
the wife of J. O. Southard, by whom she 
has one child, Eunice. 

Edward S. Eno, our subject, was born 
in Seeleyville, Pennsylvania, May 26, 1848, 
and was reared on his father's farm in Wayne 
county, being educated in the public schools. 
After leaving school he clerked for about 
eighteen months in a hardware store in his 
native town, and in 1870 commenced work 
for the New York Condensed Milk Company 
at Brewster, New York. From that time 
to the present he has been connected with 
that company and has served in almost 
every capacity, commencing work in the 
least responsible position and working his 
way up to the superintendency of one of the 
most important branches of the business. 
They manufacture Gail Borden's condensed 
milk. 

Mr. Eno was married in Wayne county, 
Pennsylvania, October 21, 1873, to Miss 
Helen A. Conyne, a native of that county, 
and a daughter of Alexander and Laura 
(Gregory) Conyne, the former a native of 
New York, the latter of Susquehanna coun-_ 



1 86 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ty, Pennsylvania, who removed to Wayne 
county in a very early day. Alexander 
Conyne was by occupation a stationary en- 
gineer, and followed that pursuit within a 
few years of his death, when he purchased 
a farm and engaged in agriculture. His 
death occurred April i, 1876. His wife, 
who is a member of the Baptist church, is 
still living and makes her home with her 
children. They were the parents of ten 
children, as follows: George W. , who mar- 
ried Charlotte Webster (now deceased) and 
resides in New Haven, Connecticut; Charles 
W., deceased; Frank F., a resident of Mon- 
tana; Helen A., wife of our subject; Clara 
P., wife of Horace White, of White Valley, 
Pennsylvania; Charles G., who married 
Anna Hawkins and now resides in Mandan, 
North Dakota; Case V., who married Mary 
Pullis and lives in Bangor, South Dakota; 
Eva L., wife of Fred W. Chase, of Butte, 
Montana; Fannie I., also a resident of 
Butte; and Herbert A., of Anaconda, Mon- 
tana. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Eno four children have 
been born: Charles Edward, who died at 
the age of fifteen months; and Herbert S. 
Laura E. and Alfred W., all of whom are 
yet under the parental roof. The family 
reside in a neat and comfortable home on 
North Spring street, Elgin, where they de- 
light to entertain their many friends. The 
parents are members of the Prospect Street 
Congregational church, in the work of which 
they are actively engaged. Fraternally, 
Mr. Eno is a member of Monitor lodge, 
No. 522, F. & A. M.; and Washington 
lodge, No. 13, A. O. U. W., of Elgin. 

In politics Mr. Eno is a thorough Re- 
publican, and has been identified with that 
party since casting his first presidential vote 
for U. S. Grant. His business interests 



have usually been such that he could not 
give much of his time to political affairs, 
more than to attend the conventions of his 
party, vote its ticket and in a quiet way 
advocate its principles. In the municipal 
affairs of his adopted city he has always 
manifested the greatest interest, and in the 
discharge of his duties as a citizen he has 
done his full share in its development. For 
two years he served as alderman from his 
ward, and his record as a member of the 
city council is a commendable one. While 
serving in that capacity he was chairman of 
the finance committee and of the special 
committee on water works. To him prob- 
ably as much as any other man is due the 
present fine water works in Elgin, acknowl- 
edged to be among the very best in the en- 
tire country. To secure the admirable sys- 
tem he devoted much time and study. He 
also served three years as a member of the 
board of education. 

For some eight or ten years Mr. Eno 
served in the fire department of the city, 
only resigning his position because he could 
not give it the time and attention necessary. 
The same energy shown in creating and 
making efficient the water works was dis- 
played by him in the fire department. 

It is, however, as superintendent of the 
Elgin Branch of the New York Condensed 
Milk Company that he is best known through- 
out Kane and adjoining counties. In 1870 
he came to Elgin as a representative of that 
company, and in 1882 he was made super- 
intendent, and has since occupied that posi- 
tion. In 1870 there was comparatively lit- 
tle doing in the milk business in Elgin, and 
what little milk found its way into this mar- 
ket was shipped to Chicago. With the es- 
tablishment of the condensed milk factory 
the business began rapidly to grow until 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



187 



to-day Elgin is recognized as the leading 
place in the United States for this industry. 
In addition to the large quantity used by 
the New York Condensed Milk Company, 
vast quantities of milk are used in the man- 
ufacture of butter and cheese. All con- 
versant with the subject acknowledge that 
to Mr. Eno and his wise management of the 
affairs of the company much of this success 
is due. In all the thirty-three years in 
which the company have operated here 
there has never been a strike among its em- 
ployees, and the best feeling is always main- 
tained by all connected with it. The super- 
intendent is honored and respected by the 
men and he honors and respects them. Dur- 
ing the campaign of 1896 a lot of politicians 
were discussing the relation between em- 
ployers and employees, one party endeavor- 
ing to show that they were antagonistic, one 
to the other. Reference was made in proof 
of this to several large institutions, when 
some one mentioned the Elgin branch of the 
New York Condensed Milk Company. The 
contending party at once objected to refer- 
ence to that company, stating aside from 
the New York Condensed Milk Company 
his contention was true. "In that com- 
pany," said he, "the superintendent and 
employees are too much like one family." 
A greater compliment could not have been 
bestowed upon Mr. Eno. All classes and 
all professions speak of him in the highest 
terms of praise. 



HENRY BLAZIER is a retired farmer 
residing in the village of Hampshire. 
His father, John Blazier, was born in the 
village of Diefenalern, Bavaria, May 28, 
1819. In his native country he learned the 
trades of cooper and brewer, and, while yet 



residing there, served three years in the Ba- 
varian army. He remained in his native 
land until 1847, when he started for Amer- 
ica with the design of enlisting in the Mexi- 
can war, but the war was closed before he 
reached the field. He sailed from Ham- 
burg and landed in New York after a voy- 
age of forty-nine days. He there secured 
work, and for a time was engaged in the 
tile factory across the river in New Jersey. 
Desiring to come west he ascended the 
Hudson, and by canal went to Buffalo, New 
York, and thence by lake to Chicago. 
Coming to Kane county, he settled in 
Hampshire township, but secured work for 
a time at the cooper's trade in Belvidere, 
Boone county, and then worked for various 
farmers in the neighborhood. During the 
war he bought land in Hampshire county, 
and, as wheat, during the latter part of the 
struggle, was two dollars per bushel, he was 
enabled to ' add to his original purchase, 
paying cash for the same. In the fall of 
1 88 1, he rented his farm and moved to the 
village of Hampshire, where he is living re- 
tired. 

John Blazier is the son of Wolf Blazier, 
of French descent, who fought against Na- 
poleon, and who served as a revenue officer 
in Germany. John Blazier first married in 
New York Barbara Ber, by whom he had 
seven children, five yet living, as follows: 
Henry, our subject; Carrie, who, on the 
29th of March, 1880, married Albert Eich- 
ler, a native of Saxony, Germany, born 
March 15, 1853, and who died May 17, 
1885. He came to this country with his 
parents, George and Sophia Eichler, and 
later purchased a farm in De Kalb county, 
Illinois, which is yet owned by his widow. 
They were the parents of two children, Al- 
bert and Ida, who now attend the public 



i88 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



schools of Hampshire; George is a farmer 
in Hampshire township; Mary married Will- 
iam Huber, by whom she has one son, 
Frank Blazier, and they reside in Kane 
county, Illinois; John is engaged in farming 
in the south end of Hampshire village. 

Henry Blazier was born in Woodbridge, 
New Jersey, April 15, 1858, and came west 
with his parents at the age of two years. 
He first attended school in Reid's district, 
and later in the Bean district, until twenty 
years of age. He then hired to his father, 
and remained with him until 1887, when he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres in 
section 16, and boarded with a family on an 
adjoining farm, and for eleven years was en- 
gaged in its cultivation with good success. 
In the spring of 1898 he rented the farm, 
and now makes his home with his sister, 
Mrs. Carrie Eichler, who has recently 
moved to the village of Hampshire. Mr. 
Blazier engaged principally in dairying while 
on the farm, usually having some twenty to 
thirty head of cows. His place was well 
improved, being tilled and ditched at a cost 
of one thousand dollars, and having a barn 
36x68 feet, and a good dwelling house at a 
cost of eighteen hundred dollars. In poli- 
tics he is a thorough Republican. 



VINCENT S. LOVELL, deceased, 
through the years of his identification 
with Kane county, enjoyed the highest re- 
spect of his fellow townsmen by reason of 
his strict integrity, true manhood and intel- 
lectual attainments. He was a gentleman 
of refinement and culture, and his deport- 
ment was always courteous and kind. His 
devotion to the public welfare also made 
him a valued factor in public life, and by 
his death Elgin was deprived of one of her 



best citizens. He was one of her native 
sons, of whom she had every reason to be 
justly proud. On the 2d of May, 1845, he 
began his earthly pilgrimage, which was 
ended December 7, 1892, covering a life- 
span of forty-seven years. 

Vincent Smith Lovell was a son of Vin- 
cent Sellar and Lucy (Smith) Lovell, and 
in a private school conducted by his mother 
he acquired his elementary education, which 
was supplemented by a course in the Elgin 
Academy. At the age of fourteen he began 
learning the printing trade in an office in 
Chicago, and after learning that trade he 
secured a position under Finder F. Ward in 
the abstract office of Geneva, Illinois. Later 
the mother removed with her two sons to 
Ann Arbor, Michigan, in order to give them 
the advantages of a college education, and 
in 1872 our subject was graduated in the 
State University. He then secured a place 
on the staff of the "Argus," a journal pub- 
lished in Albany, New York, with which he 
was connected for two years, when he again 
came to the west and became a member of 
the staff of the Chicago "Post and Mail," 
with which he was associated until entering 
into partnership with his brother, Judge 
Lovell, in the real-estate business and law 
practice. They thus carried on business 
until the death of our subject, and their ju- 
dicious management, keen foresight and un- 
flagging enterprise brought them a gratify- 
ing success. 

Mr. Lovell was married at Frankfort-on- 
the-Main, Germany, August 19, 1876, to 
Miss Eliza A. Hadwen. The lady was born 
near Halifax, Yorkshire, England, a daugh- 
ter of Thomas Wilson Hadwen, who, like 
his father, John Hadwen, was a wealthy 
cotton and silk manufacturer. The last 
named married Margaret Lovell, a daugh- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



189 



ter of John J. Lovell, a gentleman fanner 
of England. The father of Mrs. Eliza Lo- 
vell had retired from business, and with his 
family was living abroad at the time of her 
marriage. Mr. Lovell continued in active 
business in his native city until called to the 
home beyond. Although not connected 
with any church, his life was permeated by 
true Christian principles. He was consid- 
erate of the welfare and rights of others, 
had great sympathy for his fellow men, was 
benevolent, and never spoke an uncharita- 
ble word. His ability was recognized by his 
fellow citizens, he serving as mayor of the 
city, discharging the duties of the office in a 
highly satisfactory manner until he resigned 
for the reason that he could not conscien- 
tiously perform the duties of his office. He 
also served for some years as director of the 
public library. He was, however, very re- 
tiring, and few knew the depths of his na- 
ture, but his intimate friends had an appre- 
ciation and respect for him which arises 
only from true worth. 



OAMUEL C. ROWELL, deceased, was 
O for many years one of the leading men 
of Hampshire township. He was born at 
East Plainfield, Sullivan county, New Hamp- 
shire, April 13, 1819, and was the son of 
Jacob and Mary (Currier) Rowell, the for- 
mer being a farmer in New Hampshire, 
where he was born, and where his entire 
life was spent, dying after having passed 
his three score years and ten. His father, 
the grandfather of our subject, was Enoch 
Rowell, who was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary war. 

Samuel C. Rowell was reared on a farm 
and attended the district schools until the 
age of fifteen, when he entered Kimball 



Union Academy, at Meriden, New Hamp- 
shire, where he spent three years. He 
taught school winters and worked on farms 
other seasons for a time, and while working 
with a companion, laying stone wall one 
hot day, both resolved to leave the stony 
country and get a living more easily else- 
where. Accordingly, in 1840, he went to 
Kentucky, where Yankee teachers were in 
demand. He there engaged in teaching for 
about three years, and then came to Kane 
county, Illinois, riding on horseback some 
eight hundred miles. After examining con- 
siderable country, looking for a location, he 
finally decided to locate in Hampshire town- 
ship, where he bought a farm of one hun- 
dred and eighty acres from the government, 
on which he erected a dwelling house and 
then returned south teaching school in Ten- 
nessee. 

On his return north, Mr. Rowell stopped 
in Kentucky to marry the girl of his choice, 
who had been a pupil of his while teaching 
there. He was married May 13, 1844, in 
Fairview, Fleming county, Kentucky, to 
Miss Elizabeth Ball, a native of that place, 
born December 11, 1823, and a daughter of 
Silas and Tennie (Brown) Ball, the former 
born in Mason county, Kentucky, in March, 
1800. He was the son of Benjamin Ball, 
a soldier of the war of 1812, who was born 
in Virginia, and who married Nancy Cook. 
Benjamin Ball was a farmer, a relative of 
Mary (Ball) Washington, the mother of 
George Washington. He died when about 
eighty years of age. Silas Ball followed 
agricultural pursuits all his life, dying in 
1830. Elizabeth was first in the family of 
twelve children, born to Silas and Tennie 
Ball. To Mr", and Mrs. Rowell six children 
were born, of whom four survive, as follows: 
(i) Mary, wife of Corydon L. Dickson, of 



190 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Plato township, and the mother of two 
children Luella, and Ethel. The former 
married Edward Walgren, by whom she has 
one child, Eugene. (2) Fremont, who is 
in partnership with his mother, in the 
mercantile business. He married Nellie 
Ketchum, born in Hampshire, and a daugh- 
ter of Martin Van Buren and Sophronia 
(Buzzell) Ketchum, the former a native of 
New York, who died at Rouse's Point, on 
Lake Champlain, when Nellie was an infant. 
Her father was a son of Horace Ketchum, 
and her mother a daughter of Aaron Buz- 
zell. To Fremont and Nellie Rowell have 
been born two children: Beulah and Leone. 

(3) Jessie C., who married Edward Buzzeil, 
of Leaf River, Illinois, by whom she has 
two children Walter and Arthur, twins. 

(4) Olivia, who married George York, of 
Lyons, Iowa, and they have one child, 
Jessie. 

After his marriage Mr. Rowell brought 
his bride to Hampshire township and en- 
gaged in farming, which occupation he con- 
tinued until 1850, when he sold his farm 
and devoted his time to mercantile pursuits, 
having acquired an interest in a store at the 
old village of Hampshire, where he was in 
business until 1875, when he removed to 
the new village, soon after the completion 
of the railroad to that point. He erected 
one of the first business buildings in the 
village, and purchased the interest of his 
partner, and continued in the mercantile 
trade. Later he took into partnership his 
son, Fremont, and the business is still con- 
ducted under the firm name then adopted, 
Samuel C. Rowell & Son, Mrs. Rawell re- 
taining a half interest. 

Mr. Rowell was a very prominent man 
during life, his superior education giving 
him an advantage over others. He was' 



one of the incorporators of the new village 
of Hampshire, and was the first president 
of the village board. From 1858 to 1861 
he served as supervisor of the township, 
and again from 1864 to 1867. For twenty 
years he was postmaster of the village, and 
during that time would open office any time, 
day or night, for the accommodation of pa- 
trons. During his incumbency the office 
was moved from the old village to the new. 
For forty years he served as justice of the 
peace, and his administration of that office 
.was satisfactory in every respect. He also 
served as school inspector before the office 
of county superintendent of public schools 
was established. 

Mr. Rowell was made a Mason at Ma- 
rengo, Illinois, in 1850, and was one of the 
charter members of Hampshire lodge, serving 
as secretary of the lodge for over thirty 
years. Prior to the war he was a Demo- 
crat, but when the South rebelled he be- 
came a Republican, with which party he 
was identified until his death, which occurred 
November 24, 1892. He was a man of 
broad character and liberal views, univer- 
sally respected, and was greatly missed from 
his accustomed place when called to rest. 



COL. RICHARD PARRAM McGLINCY, 
eldest son of George D. and Rukamah 
McGlincy, of English and Irish descent, was 
born in Shepardstown, Jefferson county, 
West Virginia, and at an early age entered 
the printing office of John H. Yittle, of the 
"Shepardstown Register," where he re- 
mained, except during the time of the Civil 
war, rising from the position of errand boy, 
at the age of eleven years, when not much 
taller than a common ink keg, to that of 
foreman of the office, which he occupied 




COL. R. P. McGLINCY. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



193 



from the close of the war. He was fully 
equipped for all newspaper work, for which 
he had a passionate love. Trusted and 
helpful to his employer, the latter said, 
"As Dick has always stood by me, through 
thick and thin, come weal or woe, I am loth 
to part with him," when he married Asenath 
R. Wells, a graduate of the Mount Morris, 
Rock River Seminary, and at the time of 
marriage assistant principal of the Martins- 
burg, West Virginia, public schools, and 
left for Chicago in 1868. He was there 
engaged in newspaper work on the " Inter 
Ocean," and other papers, until he came to 
Elgin, Illinois, in 1869, where he entered 
more fully into the editorial and printing 
work. He soon became dairy editor on the 
Elgin " Gazette, "and also of a Minneapolis 
paper, taking an active part in the great 
dairy interests of Elgin and the Northwest, 
often serving as president of prominent so- 
cieties, and acting as secretary of two or 
three at the same time, publishing their 
annual reports, board of trade reports, etc. 
During his last ten years in Elgin he was 
the honored and valued secretary of the 
Elgin Board of Trade. He was very prom- 
inent in all dairy circles, so that hardly any 
of their conventions were considered com- 
plete without an address from him, and he 
was called to many states and cities to or- 
ganize boards of trade. He was therefore 
well and favorably known to most men in 
his line of work. 

A typical Southerner, whole-souled and 
generous, he made friends wherever he 
went, prominent among them being ex-Gov. 
W. D. Hoard, of Wisconsin, who was one 
of his dairy co-laborers. Being an Odd 
Fellow of many years standing, he was very 
prominent in that order in Elgin, and on all 
public occasions was generally their repre- 

9 . 



sentative and spokesman. He held the 
position of deputy grand master for many 
years, and retained his membership in the 
Elgin encampment up to the time of his 
death. Col. McGlincy served with dis- 
tinction all through the Civil war, and part 
of the time fought under Stonewall Jack- 
son. His father, a very prominent, dyed- 
in-the-wool West Virginia Democratic poli- 
tician, died at Shepardstown, that state, in 
1885, leaving a wife and five children, all 
of whom are living with the exception of 
Richard P., in Washington,. District of 
Columbia. 

In the fall of 1887, Colonel McGlincy 
went to San Jose, California, where he be- 
came very highly esteemed and prominent 
in the state, on account of his interest in 
all that tended to its advancement, espe- 
cially its horticultural and fruit interests. 
He was extensively engaged in the fruit 
raising and its shipping, and was given 
charge of the Santa Clara county fruit and 
wine exhibit at the Columbian World's 
Fair, at Chicago, in 1893, where many of 
his old friends were glad to see him. 

On his return to California after the 
fair, Colonel McGlincy received much favo- 
rable newspaper mention as a representa- 
tive to the state legislature. He became 
deputy internal revenue collector, and was 
holding the position at the time of his cruel 
murder, in May, 1897. In California, as 
always before, he was prominently active 
among, and helpful to the Odd Fellows, 
who honored and loved him in life, and 
now, as brothers, sincerely mourn his sad 
fate and untimely death. The hall of 
Morning Light lodge, which he had organ- 
ized at his home town, is decorated with his 
portrait, and Odd Fellows souvenirs, which 
he had received from Illinois friends. 



194 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mrs. Asenath Rhodlna (Wells) McGlincy 
was born and spent the early years of her 
life at the foot of the Alleghany mountains, 
in West Virginia, on the banks of the Val- 
ley river, whose bed is almost one contin- 
uous heap of stones. No wonder she sees 
"books in running brooks," reads "ser- 
mons in stones," and having often picked 
chestnut burrs from the trees, while stand- 
ing on the rocks, and there gathered mosses, 
wild spice, holly and wintergreen, and at- 
tended " sugaring off," in the maple woods, 
sees in the groves, "God's temples, the 
hills his dwelling place," and loves the 
rocks the more the higher they tower. 
Being the eldest daughter of David and 
Mary Ann Wells, of Scotch, German and 
English origin, she largely inherits Scotch 
characteristics and their love of the sciip- 
tures, the German literary taste, with love 
of flowers and home, and a puritanic rever- 
ence of much in our forefathers, which so 
conspired to make our loved America great 
as it is. 

In her early life her parents came west, 
and with a family of eight children, settled 
near Galena. Having made good progress 
in her studies, at the age of twelve she was 
placed in the noted school of A. B. C. 
Campbell, in that hilly city, the early home 
of U. S. Grant, then all surrounded by rich 
lead mines. From Galena she became a 
neighbor and schoolmate of John A. Raw- 
lins, first on General Grant's staff, and later, 
secretary of war in General Grant's cabi- 
net. At this country school they sat 
together on backless benches, ran races, 
played ball and " spelled down " the con- 
test always hot between the two. From 
this country school both went to Rock River 
Seminary, at Mt. Morris, Illinois, then the 
most prominent Methodist educational in- 



stitution in Illinois to the state then, what 
Evanston is now. After years of hard study, 
alternated with teaching in Mt. Morris, and 
other places in the country, she com- 
pleted her course of study in the seminary, 
and went again to Galena, and assisted her 
brother, James William Wells, who was 
principal of its public schools. From that 
position she went in charge of the Galena 
Academy, remaining until her brother de- 
cided to go to California, in 1850, when she 
left and took the principalship of the Shulls- 
burg, Wisconsin, school, where she gave 
good satisfaction for years. Her next 
teaching was as assistant principal in the 
Dubuque, Iowa, schools, and from there in 
1863, she took the principalship of the Des 
Moines, Iowa, schools, remaining until near 
the close of the late Civil war. In April, 
1865, as she was boarding a train fora visit 
to her early West Virginia, home the news 
came of President Lincoln's assassination. 
While in this old mountain home, visiting 
and teaching, the last of which was as assist- 
ant principal in the Martinsburg, West 
Virginia, schools, she formed the acquant- 
ance of Richard Parran McGlincy, to whom 
she was married in July, 1868. Coming 
immediately west, by way of Washington, 
Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and 
Niagara Falls to Chicago, they there re- 
sided until March, 1869, and then settled in 
Elgin, Illinois. After coming to Elgin she 
engaged in teaching in a select school for a 
number of years, having among her scholars 
many young men and women now promi- 
nently engaged in business in Elgin and 
elsewhere. She is a Chautauqua graduate, 
now holding her certificate as a graduate of 
the Chautauqua National Literary Circle. 
She now lives again on the banks of a river, 
in the lovely valley of the Fox, in her own 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



'95 



beautiful home, trying to make the most and 
best of life, for self and others, surrounded 
by and loving as ever, her flowers and 
books. 

DR. BEEBE, a well-known insurance 
agent living at No. 4 1 1 Walnut avenue, 
Elgin, was born September 6, 1847, m Co- 
lumbia county, New York, of which state his 
parents, Riley and Amelia (Bunker) Beebe, 
were also natives. The father, who was a 
cooper by trade, removed from New York 
to Kane county, Illinois, in 1852, locating in 
Geneva, where he engaged in farming and 
gardening for some years. Subsequently 
he came to Elgin, where he passed away in 
his eighty-eighth year, while his wife died in 
May, 1897, in her eighty-second year. He 
was a consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, while she was a Spiritual- 
ist in religious belief. 

Born to this worthy couple were four- 
teen children, but only six are now living, 
three of whom are residents of Kane coun- 
ty, those beside our subject being Amos C., 
a blacksmith employed in the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy railroad shops at 
Aurora, and Mrs. Mary E. Olson, of Elgin. 
Four of the sons were numbered among 
the defenders of the Union during the Civil 
war. Thomas J., the oldest, who is now 
a resident of Anthony, Harper county, 
Kansas, enlisted August 7, 1861, in an in- 
dependent company, known as the Kane 
County Cavalry, which afterward served as 
body guard to Generals Halleck, Curtis and 
Steele. He entered the service as a pri- 
vate, was made orderly, and on the 2d of 
October, 1863, was commissioned captain 
of his company, which was afterward con- 
solidated by the War Department and made 
a part of the Fifteenth Illinois Cavalry. He 



remained in the service three years, and 
was in many important battles. James E. 
was a member of the same company, but 
at the end of nineteen months of faithful 
service he was honorably discharged on ac- 
count of physical disability. On regaining 
his health, he re-enlisted and served 'until 
the close of the war, being in Texas with 
the last remnant of the forces against Kirby 
Smith. He died October 8, 1895, at tne 
age of fifty-four years. John W., who was 
born December 5, 1843, enlisted at the same 
time as his older brothers in the s'ame com- 
pany, in which he served as a private until 
mustered out at the expiration of his three 
years' term of enlistment. He died Sep- 
tember 27, 1883. 

Our subject, also one of the boys in blue, 
was reared and educated in Kane county, 
and when only sixteen years of age joined 
the Union army, enlisting November 18, 
1863, in Company B, Seventeenth Illinois 
Cavalry. He was engaged in the most dan- 
gerous kind of warfare, that of hunting 
bushwhackers, never being able to meet 
them in fair field. After the surrender of 
Lee the company of which Mr. Beebe was 
a member was ordered to the plains under 
command of General Dodge, and there took 
part in several engagements with the hos- 
tile Indians, being stationed on Big creek in 
western Kansas. There were no railroads 
or settlements in that region, but Mr. Beebe 
enjoyed the time spent there, as he had 
ample opportunity to engage in his favorite 
sport, that of hunting, killing many buffa- 
loes and wolves. In December, 1865, he 
was honorably discharged, after having 
served two years and one month, and re- 
turned to his home. 

On starting out in life for himself Mr. 
Beebe was employed as a blacksmith's 



196 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



helper in the C. , B. & Q. shops at Aurora. 
In 1872 he went to Guthrie county, Iowa, 
and for about four years was engaged in 
farming near Casey. He then removed to 
Marshalltown, Iowa, where he was em- 
ployed in the railroad shops for six years. 
Later he worked in the Iowa Central rail- 
road shops, where he learned railroad spring 
making, at which he worked for about three 
years, returning to Kane county at the end 
of that time, and was employed in the Elgin 
Watch Factory for about twelve years. 
Since the spring of 1893 he has successfully 
engaged in the insurance business in Elgin, 
representing the Mutual Benefit, of Newark, 
New Jersey, and the Atlas Accident Com- 
pany, of Boston. 

While in Iowa Mr. Beebe was married, 
October 7, 1874, to Miss Angelina C. Por- 
ter, who successfully engaged in teaching in 
that state for four years, conducting one 
village school and the others in the country. 
Her parents, James and Lucy (Carpenter) 
Porter, were natives of Ohio, born near 
Zanesville. Her father, who served as 
county superintendent of schools in Jasper 
county, Iowa, for six years, always took an 
active and prominent part in educational 
affairs. Helso filled the office of justice 
of the peace. His death occurred in 1876, 
when he was fifty-eight years of age, but his 
widow is still living and now makes her 
home in Nebraska. Of their six children, 
five are also living. They are as follows: 
Lyman, an attorney of Loveland, Colorado; 
Angeline C., wife of our subject; Horace, 
a farmer of Cozad, Nebraska; Frank, a 
farmer of Casey, Iowa; George, also a farmer 
of Cozad, Nebraska; and Docia, who was 
the second in order of birth and died at the 
age of thirteen months. Mr. Porter's ma- 
ternal grandfather served for seven long years 



inthe Colonial army duringthe Revolutionary 
war, and in the possession of the family is 
an old brass kettle which he captured full 
of butter from the Tories at the battle of 
Monmouth. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Beebe were born four 
children, namely: Edgar D., who is now 
working in a shoe factory in Elgin; Edith, 
who died at the age of one year; Ethel May 
and Ruth, both at home. Mrs. Beebe holds 
membership in the Eastern Star and the 
Woman's Relief Corps, having served as 
president of the latter for three terms. Mr. 
Beebe is the present recording secretary of 
the Court Bluff City, -No. 74, Independent 
Order of Foresters of Illinois, and for three 
years he has also served as commander of 
Veteran post, No. 49, G. A. R., of Elgin. 
He is very progressive in his views, believ- 
ing in keeping abreast with the latter day 
nineteenth-century progress. In 1892 he 
was elected alderman of Elgin, and accepta- 
bly filled that position for two terms. 



WILLIS LYMAN BLACK. One of 
the prominent representatives of the 
journalist profession is the gentleman whose 
name heads this brief notice, junior mem- 
ber of the firm of Lowrie & Black, proprie- 
tors of the "Daily News" and "Weekly Ad- 
vocate," of Elgin, Illinois. He is one of the 
leading and prominent business men of the 
city, being especially interested in its bank- 
ing institutions. 

Mr. Black was born in Elgin, where the 
Baptist church is now located, April 18, 
1855, and is a son of Lyman and Harriet 
(Weston) Black. His paternal grandfather, 
James Black, spent his entire life in Massa- 
chusetts. The father, Lyman Black, was 
born in Granville, that state, October 26, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



197 



1815, and was the youngest in a family of 
eight children. In the spring of 1836 he 
came to Elgin, passing through Chicago, 
where he was offered the block on which the 
Palmer House now stands for a pair of boots 
he was carrying over his shoulder, but he 
declined the offer. On the present site of 
Elgin he engaged in farming for some time, 
but later in life devoted his time and atten- 
tion to the banking business, being one of 
the organizers of the First National Bank, 
and also the Elgin City Banking Company, 
more familiarly known as the Savings Bank, 
and in both of these institutions he was a 
director and vice-president. He continued 
his connection with them until his death, 
which occurred May 15, 1889. He was a 
man of medium size, was quite domestic in 
his tastes, was pleasant and genial in his 
disposition, and was gifted with a fine mem- 
ory, which was of great benefit not only to 
himself but to others who desired informa- 
tion concerning current matters. His wife 
was born in Utica, New York, December 
1 6, 1823, and was the daughter of James 
and Margaret Weston, who, in 1846, came 
to Elgin, where Mr. and Mrs. Black were 
married June 27, 1847. She was a devot- 
ed member of the Baptist church, and died 
in that faith November 26, 1891. Of their 
five children three died in infancy, and 
Weston died at the age of eighteen years 
from the effects of a kick from a horse. 

Our subject, the only one of the family 
now living, acquired his primary education 
in the public schools of Kane county, later 
graduated at the Elgin Academy, and in 
1874 entered the Chicago University, where 
he was graduated with the class of 1878. 
For a year after leaving college he was em- 
ployed in Chamberlain's clothing house, and 
then entered the office of the "Advocate" 



to learn the business. In 1 886 he purchased 
a half interest in that journal and the 
"Daily News," the former of which was 
founded in 1848, the latter in 1873. The 
"Advocate," now the oldest paper in the 
county, is a seven-column quarto, and en- 
joys the largest circulation of any paper in 
the district. It is published on Saturdays. 
The "News" is the same size, and is also 
the oldest daily in the county. The office 
of these journals is equipped with modern 
machinery, including type-setting machines 
and Webb press, and in connection with the 
printing department there is also a bindery. 
Both papers are unwavering in their sup- 
port of the Republican party and its prin- 
ciples, and are devoted to the interests of 
Elgin and Kane county. Mr. Black is a 
heavy stockholder in both the First National 
Bank and the City Savings Bank, in which 
he is a director and vice-president. 

On the 4th of September, 1884, Mr. 
Black was united in marriage with Miss 
Etta D. Roe, who was born in Rolling 
Prairie, Indiana, May 4, 1864, a daughter 
of George W. and Marietta (Drummond) 
Roe, of Chicago. She is the second in or- 
der of birth in their family of four children, 
the others being Alta May; James, who was 
drowned at Rolling Prairie, Indiana, in 
1883; and Clifford G. Mr. and Mrs. Black 
have two children: Lyman Foster, born 
March 16, 1887; and Mareta Vergine, born 
August 31, 1892. The family have a beau- 
tiful home at No. 237 Villa street, Elgin, 
which was erected by Mr. Black, and also 
have a cottage at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, 
where they spend the summer months. 

Politically, Mr. Black is a Republican, 
and socially is an honored member of the 
Century Club, while his wife is an active 
and prominent member of the Coffee Club 



198 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and the Every Wednesday Literary Club. 
Of high social qualities, they are very pop- 
ular, having a most extensive circle of 
friends and acquaintances, and their home 
is the abode of hospitality and good cheer. 



/CHARLES P. DEANE, a well-known 
v_> retired business man living in Elgin, 
was born in Worcester county, Massachu- 
setts, April 4, 1813, a son of Cyrus and 
Nancy (Howe) Dean, also natives of that 
state, where they spent their entire lives, 
the father dying at the age of eighty-seven 
in the house where he learned his trade, 
and the mother at the age of eighty-five. 
Throughout life he worked on watches and 
clocks at the goldsmith's trade, and gave 
his entire time to his business affairs, taking 
no active part in public life. Both he and 
his wife were faithful members of the Con- 
gregational church, and were held in high 
esteem by all who knew them. Of their 
seven children only two are now living: 
Charles P. ; and Nancy, wife of Charles 
Lyon, of Oak Park, Chicago. 

The subject of this sketch was educated 
in the common schools of Massachusetts, 
and when his school days were over he 
went to New York, where he was employed 
at various occupations for a few years. For 
four years he engaged in the planing-mill 
business in Lewiston, Maine, and then re- 
turned to Massachusetts, assisting his brother 
George in the manufacturing business at 
Maiden for two years. Coming west in 
1857, Mr. Deane located in Elgin and 
opened up and developed a good farm two 
miles northwest of the city, but now within 
the corporate limits. To agricultural pur- 
suits he devoted his energies for six years, 
and then erected a store on Grove avenue, 



Elgin, purchased a stock of goods, and 
began business as a merchant, being thus 
engaged until 1880, when he sold out, and 
has since lived retired. 

On the 3d of July, 1841, Mr. Deane was 
united in marriage with Miss Mary P. Bald- 
ridge, who died April 21, 1851, aged twenty- 
seven years. To them were born three 
children, namely: Cyrus F., born Novem- 
ber 13, 1842, was a member of the Army of 
the Southwest during the Civil war, and 
was mortally wounded at the battle of Stone 
River in 1862, dying at Nashville, January 
15, 1863; Maria N. married Daniel W. 
Brown, also a Union soldier, who died in 
Elgin, and to them were born three chil- 
dren Edna, Charles and Cyrus; she resides 
in Elgin. Charles H., the youngest of the 
family, died February 25, 1850, at the age 
of six years. 

Mr. Deane was again married, March 24, 
18^3, his second union being with Miss 
Abbie M. Haskell, by whom he had four 
children: Mary A. is now a successful kin- 
dergarten teacher in Elgin; Ella J. is the 
wife of Joseph Mitchell, of Elgin, and has 
three children, Howard, Deane and Ethelyn; 
Lizzie A. died March 7, 1859, when only 
six months old; and Julia F. is a stenog- 
rapher and type writer employed in an 
office in Chicago. 

Politically Mr. Deane was originally a 
Whig, but since the dissolution of that 
party he has been a stanch Republican. 
For many years he was one of the active 
and progressive business men of the county, 
as well as one of its most reliable and hon- 
ored citizens, and now in his declining years 
he is enjoying a well-earned rest, free from 
the cares and responsibilities of business 
life. Throughout Kane county he is widely 
and favorably known. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



199 



DAVID HILL, proprietor of the nursery 
near Dundee, has been a resident of 
Kane county since 1872. He was born in 
Hartfordshire, about thirty miles from Lon- 
don, England, January 17, 1849, and is the 
son of Henry and Martha (Grayes) Hill, 
both of whom were natives of the same shire. 
In his native land he grew to manhood, and 
had fair educational advantages. He com- 
menced nursery work in Bedford, England, 
in early life, and worked there for some 
years. In 1871 he came to the United 
States, forming one of a party of three 
young men. Going to Boston he made 
application for work at the Young Men's 
Christian Association rooms, and on the 
advice of the secretary went to Wood- 
stock, Windham county, Connecticut, where 
he secured work in the Spaulding's nursery 
and fruit farm, where he remained about one 
year. In 1872 he came west to Dundee, 
and went to work on a farm near that place 
for one winter. The next season he com- 
menced work in the nursery then owned by 
William Hill, and continued with him until 
his death. He then succeeded to the busi- 
ness through his wife, who was a niece of 
William Hill, and came with him from Scot- 
land when a child. At that time the place 
consisted of six acres, with but two in nurs- 
ery stock. An incumbrance was on the 
place of two thousand dollars. Our subject 
went to work and put out more stock, and 
buying land from time to time is now the 
owner of one hundred and six acres, all of 
which is near, but not contiguous, to the old 
place. He has put out nursery stock until 
he has in all some eighty-five acres. He 
grows for the wholesale trade as well as re- 
tail. His specialties are hardy evergreens, 
shade, ornamental and forest trees, although 
he grows and deals in fruit trees and small 



fruit. His trade is mostly in the western 
states, and he has built up an extensive 
business, employing from seventy-five to one 
hundred men in packing and shipping in the 
busy season. 

In June, 1878, Mr. Hill was united in 
marriage at Dundee, Illinois, with Miss 
Maggie Grant, a native of Aberdeen, Scot- 
land, and a niece of William Hill, who came 
with him to the United States when a miss 
of twelve years. Her education, began in 
her native country, was completed in the 
schools of Kane county. By this union there 
are six living children George W., Arthur 
H., Waudie, Mabel, Vernon and Florence. 
They lost one daughter, Marguerite, who 
died at the age of six months. 

Politically Mr. Hill is a stanch Republic- 
an, his first Presidential vote being cast for 
James A. Garfield. Since becoming a resi- 
dent of this country he has always mani- 
fested a commendable interest in its political 
affairs, though not in a strictly partisan 
sense. A friend of education and the public 
schools, he has given^of his time to advance 
their interests as a member of the school 
board. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, the blue lodge at Dun- 
dee, and the chapter at Elgin. With his 
estimable wife he holds membership in the 
Baptist church. 

Mr. Hill has now been a resident of Illi- 
nois for twenty-nine years. His life affords 
an example to the young in that he com- 
menced his life here without money or 
friends, but having a determination to suc- 
ceed he industriously applied himself until 
he has acquired a good property and a large 
and fairly prosperous business. He is well 
known throughout Illinois and other west- 
ern states for his sterling character and 
worth. 



200 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



M 



ERRITT HARGER, an honored and 
highly respected citizen of Elgin, is 
now retired from the active labors of life 
and occupies a comfortable home on Hen- 
dee avenue, overlooking the Fox river. He 
was born July 31, 1819, in Lewis county, 
New York, a son of Noah N. and Lucy 
(Gillette) Harger, who were both born and 
reared in Connecticut. The father was a 
carpenter and joiner, and also followed the 
occupation of farming. In 1855 he came 
with our subject to Kane county, Illinois, 
where he died April n, 1863, his wife hav- 
ing previously passed away at their old 
home in New York, on the 2Oth of May, 
1850. Both were consistent members of 
the Presbyterian church, and in politics he 
was first a Whig and later a Republican. 
Their children were Morgan and Mrs. Maria 
Arthur, both deceased; Madison, who died 
in Ohio; Mary, now the widow of Henry 
Ragan, and a resident of Syracuse, New 
York; Milton, deceased; Merritt, the sub- 
ject of this sketch; and Lydia and Mar- 
tha, both deceased. 

In the county of his nativity, Merritt 
Harger grew to manhood, obtaining his edu- 
cation in the district schools, and early be- 
coming familiar with the duties which fall 
to the lot of the agriculturist. There he 
continued to follow farming until 1855 
when he came to Kane county, Illinois, and 
bought a small farm in Plato township, to 
the cultivation and improvement of which 
he devoted his energies for ten years. Sell- 
ing that place, he purchased four hundred 
and ten acres of slightly improved land in 
the southern part of the same township, 
which he placed under a high state of culti- 
vation. He erected thereon good and sub- 
stantial buildings and made many other use- 
ful improvements, which added to its value 



and attractive appearance, making it one of 
the best farms in the county. He was one 
of the first men in the community to engage 
in sheep raising to any great extent, but 
when wool became so cheap that it proved 
unprofitable he discontinued the business. 
He then directed his attention to dairying, 
and was one of the first to engage in the 
manufacture of cheese, which was then in 
demand. At one time he sold his cheese 
by the ton at twenty cents per pound. 
After residing upon his second farm for 
twenty-nine years, he decided to retire from 
active work, and removed to Elgin, where 
he has since made his home, enjoying the 
fruits of former toil. 

In Lewis county, New York, Mr. Harger 
was married October 17, 1843, to Miss 
Mary E., daughter of Jonathan and Eliza- 
beth (Herin) Rogers, natives of the Empire 
state. Her paternal grandfather was born 
in Connecticut, and was one of the first set- 
tlers of Lewis county, New York. Soon 
after our subject came west, Mr. and Mrs. 
Rogers also came to Kane county and 
located in Elgin township, where he pur- 
chased and operated a large tract of land. 
Besides Mrs. Harger, their other children 
were Betsy Ann, Grange L. and Henry C. , 
all deceased; and Nelson, John H. and Jane, 
still residents of Illinois. Mrs. Harger de- 
parted this life September 2, 1895. By her 
marriage to our subject she became the 
mother of one child, Lucy Maria, who was 
born December 21, 1864, and married 
James M. Buzzell, now deceased. She died 
September -22. 1884, leaving no children. 
Mr. Harger was again married, November 
26, 1896, his second union being with 
Adella Kenyon, a daughter of Lafayette and 
and Mary (Winsor) Kenyon. 

Mr. Harger cast his first presidential 




MERRITT HARGER. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



203 



vote for William Henry Harrison in 1840, 
during one of the most exciting campaigns 
ever held in this country. His support is 
now given to the men and measures of the 
Republican party. He has sold his farm 
and has invested in real estate in Elgin, 
which is proving quite profitable. Mr. Har- 
ger is widely and favorably known through- 
out Kane county, and it is safe to say that 
no man in Elgin county has more or warmer 
friends. 

HOWARD L. PRATT, M. D. Among 
the well-known representatives of the 
medical profession in Elgin, whose reputa- 
tion is not confined alone to the city in which 
he makes his home, but who is favorably 
known in several counties and in at least 
two states of the union, is the subject of 
this sketch. Born at Unionville, Lake coun- 
ty, Ohio, February 27, 1850, he is the son 
of George and Adaline S. (Torrey) Pratt, 
the former a native of Ohio, the latter of 
New York. They were the parents of five 
children, of whom three are now living: 
Howard Lewis, our subject; Mary E. , wife 
of F. E. Miller, of Chicago; and Edith, wife 
of Frank McAllister, of Chicago. 

George Pratt, the father, grew to man- 
hood in his native state, and in youth learned 
the trade of a blacksmith, which trade he 
followed until his removal to Illinois in 
1855. While yet residing in Ohio he mar- 
ried Adaline S. Torrey, a daughter of Ira 
Allen Torrey, a native of Vermont, and a 
hotel keeper for many years, who later emi- 
grated to Neenah, Wisconsin, where his 
death occurred at the age of sixty-nine years. 
His wife traced her ancestry back to Tabitha 
Goodenough, her great-grandmother. Mrs. 
Torrey's father, who bore the name of 
Wallis, was a soldier of the war of 1812, 



and died while held a prisoner by the British 
in Canada. 

On coming to Illinois with his family, in 
1855, George Pratt located at Woodstock, 
McHenry county, where he followed his 
trade and engaged in farming for some years, 
besides being interested in the lumber busi- 
ness. He later removed to Chicago, where 
his wife died in January, 1895. She was a 
conscientious Christian woman, a member 
of the Baptist church for many years, and 
died in the faith of a resurrection beyond 
the grave and a re-union of loved ones. 
After her death her husband returned to 
Woodstock, where he is now working at his 
trade, although seventy-five years of age. 
He is yet hale and hearty. 

Lewis Pratt, the paternal grandfather 
of our subject, was a native of Vermont, 
and was numbered among the pioneers of 
the "Western Reserve," settling in Ash- 
tabula county, Ohio. His death occurred 
after a short illness while he was on a busi- 
ness trip to western Ohio, before he was 
forty years of age. His brother, Charles, 
built by contract the first government har- 
bor at Ashtabula. His family consisted of 
three sons and four daughters who grew to 
mature years. By occupation he was a 
farmer, following that vocation during his 
entire life. His father, the great-grandfa- 
ther of Dr. Pratt, was a Baptist minister in 
Vermont, and lived to the age of ninety- 
nine years and six months. He was a man 
of remarkable mental and physical activity. 
At the age of ninety he invited his grand- 
son, Charles, Jr., who was visiting him, to 
go with him to the barn to see a favorite 
colt. On reaching the farmyard gate he 
placed his hands on the top bar and cleared 
it with a leap, saying, "Charles, you can't 
do that." 



2O4 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Howard Lewis Pratt was but five years 
old when he was brought by his parents to 
Illinois. His literary education was obtained 
in the public schools of Woodstock, Mc- 
Henry county, and in Todd's Academy, now 
conducted as a seminary at that place. In 
1874 he commenced reading medicine and 
the following year entered Rush Medical 
College, Chicago, an institution noted for 
the better class of its graduates, from which 
he received a diploma in 1878. Returning 
to Woodstock, he at once commenced prac- 
tice with his preceptor in the city in which 
he was reared and where his manner of life 
was well known. Kansas, the great Sun- 
flower state, was now having a boom and a 
large nnmber of people were attracted there. 
Dr. Pratt was among the number, and in 
April, 1879, he took up his residence in 
Wellington, that state, where he resumed 
practice. 

While in Wellington, on the 2ist of Oc- 
tober, 1880, Dr. Pratt married Miss Edith 
A. Smith, a daughter of Joel and Emaline 
L. (Brown) Smith, of Marengo, Illinois, the 
latter a native of Cortland, New York, and 
one of the early teachers in the public schools 
of Dundee, Illinois, and the former of Rut- 
land, Vermont. Her father was a pioneer 
of DuPage county, Illinois, where he located 
in 1857. To Dr. and Mrs. Pratt two chil- 
dren were born Ada A. and Alice M., who 
yet remain at home. 

In October, 1883, Dr. Pratt removed 
with his family to Elgin and in the fifteen 
years that have since passed he has built up 
an extensive practice. His office is in his own 
home at No. 266 Chicago street. He is 
engaged in general practice. He was elected 
in 1897 president of the Fox River Valley 
Medical Association. 

Dr. and Mrs. Pratt are members of the 



First Baptist church of Elgin. In the work 
of the church they both take a lively inter- 
est. Politically he is a Republican. So- 
cially the family move in the best circles 
and are universally esteemed for their many 
excellent qualities of head and heart. 



JOHN A. RUSSELL, a representative 
of the legal fraternity, with office in 
Cook block, Elgin, is a native of Kane 
county, Illinois, born in St. Charles, Oc- 
tober 4, 1854. He is the son of John 
and Jeanette (Beith) Russell, natives of 
Scotland, and the parents of three children, 
the others being Wm. B., of Newhall, Iowa, 
and Hannah M., of Elgin. John Russell, 
the father, was a stone mason by trade, and 
on coming to America located at St. Charles, 
where he died in 1857, while still a young 
man. His wife died the previous year. 
Both were members of the Congregational 
church. 

Both the paternal and maternal grand- 
fathers of our subject were of Scotch birth. 
The former, the father of four sons, died in 
his native land at an advanced age. The 
latter, Robert Beith, came to America with 
his wife, Barbara, in company with Mr. 
and Mrs. Russell, and also located at St. 
Charles, where he died at the age of 
about seventy years. His wife lived to be 
ninety. Robert Beith was in comfortable 
circumstances financially and lived a retired 
life in St. Charles. 

John A. Russell was but two years of age 
when his mother died, and only three years 
old when his father passed away, so that he 
never knew the great love of father or 
mother. When five years old he was taken 
from his native town and for five or six 
years was in Minnesota and Iowa. Return- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



205 



ing to Kane county, be attended Elgin 
Academy for a time, and then read law in 
the office of Botsford & Barry. After com- 
pleting his studies he passed a successful ex- 
amination at Springfield and was admitted 
to the bar January 3, 1879. Opening an 
office in Elgin he has since continued to 
practice there with good success. 

Mr. Russell was married December 24, 
1888, to Miss Clara Mair, of Batavia, Illi- 
nois, daughter of James Mair, a well-known 
resident of that place. Two children have 
come to bless this union: Marion and Mar- 
jorie. In her religious views Mrs. Russell 
is a Methodist, holding membership in the 
church of that denomination in Elgin. 

Fraternally Mr. Russell is a member of 
Monitor lodge, No. 522 A. F. & A. M.; 
Loyal L. Munn chapter, No. 96, R. A. M. ; 
Bethel cornmandery, No. 36, K. T. , all of 
Elgin, and Medina Temple of the Scottish 
Rite, Chicago. Politically he is an enthu- 
siastic Republican, and in the welfare of 
his party takes great interest. He has been 
a member of the county central committee 
four years; chairman of the senatorial com- 
mittee of the fourteenth senatorial district 
two years; and was also secretary of the 
State League of Republican clubs two years, 
preceding the campaign of 1 896. For some 
years be has done more or less campaign 
work, taking the stump in Kane and adjoin- 
ing counties. A fluent speaker, he has done 
much to keep his native county in line with 
the Republican party. 

It is as an attorney, however, that Mr. 
Russell is best known, the one profession in 
which he takes great delight. His ability 
in this calling is unquestioned and success 
has crowned his efforts. In addition to his 
private practice he served three years as 
city attorney of Elgin, and four years as 



state's attorney of Kane county. Law 
breakers had reason to fear him as a prose- 
cutor. 

While confining himself principally to 
his legal business Mr. Russell has always felt 
an interest in the manufacturing institutions 
and other industries of the county. He is 
now serving as secretary of the W. H. How- 
ell Company, of Geneva, that manufactures 
six tons of sad irons per day in connection 
with a machine shop where many other ar- 
ticles of usefulness are manufactured. 

An almost life-long resident of the coun- 
ty, Mr. Russell has an extended acquaint- 
ance in all parts, and this acquaintance is 
not confined to Kane county, but extends 
throughout the state, his position as secre- 
tary of the Republican League bringing him 
in contact with many of the oldest and best 
men in the state. His pleasant manners 
and good conversational powers make him 
friends wherever he goes. 



WILLIAM HENRY GOETTING, pro- 
prietor of the Elgin Steam Laundry 
at 115-117 Division street, has for fifteen 
years been a resident of Elgin. Through- 
out his career of continued and far-reaching 
usefulness his duties have been performed 
with the greatest care, and his business in- 
terests have been so managed as to win him 
the confidence of the public and the pros- 
perity which should always attend honorable 
effort. 

Mr. Goetting was born in Schaumberg, 
Cook county, Illinois, October 9, 1859, and 
is a son of Charles and Dorothea (Kraegel) 
Goetting, in whose family were five chil- 
dren, but only two are now living, the other 
being Matilda, widow of Jacob Theobold. 
The father, who was a brick and stone 



2O6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



mason and a plasterer by trade, came to 
Americ?. from Germany in 1863 and first 
located in Addison township, Du Page coun- 
ty, Illinois, but later took up his residence 
in Cook county, where he died in 1888, at 
the age. of eighty-two years. His wife had 
passed away some years previous, dying in 
1873, at the age of fifty. Both held mem- 
bership in the Lutheran Church, and were 
widely and favorably known. The paternal 
grandfather of our subject was a laboring 
man and while serving in the German army 
was killed by a French soldier. He had 
only one son. Dietrich Kraegel, the ma- 
ternal grandfather, also served for some 
time in the German army, but later came 
to America, and his death occurred in 
Du Page county, Illinois, when in his eight- 
ieth year. By trade he was a tailor. In 
his family were six children. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 
much the usual manner of farmer boys and 
in the public schools of Cook county ob- 
tained his education. During his youth he 
first worked on a farm, then he learned the 
carpenter's trade and also learned to operate 
a stationary engine. On coming to Elgin 
in 1882 he worked at his trade of carpenter 
for three years, and for the same length of 
time was employed in the Elgin Steam 
Laundry. At the end of that time he pur- 
chased the plant and business, which he has 
since successfully conducted. He gives em- 
ployment to from twenty to twenty-five 
persons, and the work turned out is excep- 
tionally fine. 

On the 26th of June, 1886, was cele- 
brated the marriage of Mr. Goetting and 
Miss Mary Borchert, a daughter of Gottlieb 
and Elizabeth (Springer) Borchert. Three 
children were born to them Charles G., 
Bertha A., and Ida E. , but the first two 



named are now deceased. The parents are 
prominent members of the St. Paul's Evan- 
gelical Church, and Mr. Goetting is now 
serving as church treasurer. He belongs to 
St. Paul's Benefit Society, and the Colum- 
bian Knights, and politically is identified 
with the Republican party. He resides at 
216 Dexter avenue, where he has a pleasant 
home, and there the many friends of the 
family are always sure of a hearty welcome. 
As a business man he is enterprising and 
progressive, and as a citizen he meets every 
requirement. 



JACOB PHILIP LONG, deceased, was 
born in Hamburg, Germany, in' the val- 
ley of the Rhine, March 6, 1825, and died 
at his home in Elgin, on the 2Oth of Sep- 
tember, 1896. His life span therefore 
covered the Psalmist's span of three score 
years and ten, and the record which he 
made during that period was one character- 
ized by business ability and well-merited 
successes, by honorable dealing and by the 
regard which is ever accorded genuine 
worth. 

Mr. Long was a son of Jacob and Kath- 
arine (Younge) Lange, also natives of Ger- 
many, and it is only by the American repre- 
sentatives of the family that the name is 
spelled " Long." The father of our subject 
was a wagon-maker and spent his entire life 
in the country of his nativity. His wife was 
a daughter of a wealthy distiller of the pro- 
vince of Hessen, who was the owner of a 
large farm and much real estate, and who 
was also a soldier under Napoleon. 

Mr. Long, of this review, learned the 
trade of wagon making under the direction 
of his father, and that of distilling with his 
maternal grandfather. After his mother's 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



207 



death he entered the German army in which 
he served for four years. Upon his return 
home he found that his father had married 
again and being much displeased with this 
state of affairs he resolved to come to Amer- 
ica. Accordingly he made all preparations 
to leave his native land and sailed from 
Havre to New York, whence he made his 
way to Chicago and then to Elgin. Here 
he worked at the wagonmaker's trade as a 
journeyman for a time, and then embarked 
in business on his own account. His first 
factory, established on Milwaukee and River 
streets, was destroyed by fire, and he then 
removed to a temporary shop on River 
street, in which he carried on business until 
the completion of a fine two-story brick 
shop and factory, which was erected at No. 
112 Division street, in 1879. There he 
carried on business until his death. He did 
a large repairing trade and built up an ex- 
tensive business in the manufacture of all 
kinds of vehicles, which on account of the 
excellence of the workmanship found a 
ready sale on the market. The enterprise 
which he conducted therefore proved a prof- 
itable one and enabled him to surround his 
family not only with the necessities, but also 
many of the luxuries, of life. 

Mr. Long was married in Cook county, 
Illinois, about ten miles east of Elgin, to 
Miss Caroline Wilhausen, who was born in 
Kur Hessen, Germany, and came to Amer- 
ica when fourteen years of age with her par- 
ents, Frederick and Caroline Wilhausen. 
Her father owned a small farm in Kur Hes- 
sen, but disposed of that property in 1847, 
and with his family sailed from Bremen to 
New York. He then made his way to Chi- 
cago, where he resided for two months, while 
seeking a desirable farm. Finally he pur- 
chased land near Schaumberg, Cook coun- 



ty, where he continued to make his home 
until his death, about 1853. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Long were born six children, but three 
died in infancy. Those still living are Julia, 
wife of August Schwemm, a machinist of Chi- 
cago; Anna, who is residing with her mother; 
and Herman Frederick, who carries on the 
business left by his father. He learned the 
blacksmith's trade in his father's shop, also 
wagon making and carriage painting, and 
now displays marked ability in his conduct 
of the industry. He was born in Elgin, 
May 1 6, 1872, was educated in the public 
schools and Drew's Business College, and 
when twenty years of age put aside his text 
books to take up the practical duties of busi- 
ness life. Like his father, he is a Democrat, 
and is a progressive, wide-awake young 
business man, and a popular citizen. 

Jacob P. Long was a valued member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
a consistent member of St. John's Evangel- 
ical church. He found his greatest enjoy- 
ment in his home arnid his family, but was 
not without a large circle of warm friends. 
He was large-hearted, generous and kindly, 
possessed a jovial disposition, was true to 
every trust reposed in him, and possessed 
such sterling characteristics that the highest 
regard was ever his. 



EDGAR E. HOXIE, a locomotive engin. 
eer on the Chicago & Northwestern 
railroad, now residing at No. 320 Center 
street, Elgin, is one of the valued citizens of 
that place, and is a representative of one of 
the old and respected families of Kane coun- 
ty. He was born in Dundee, October 18, 
1845, a son of George W. and Fidelia (Aid- 
rich) Hoxie, who were natives of Massachu- 
setts, and were married just across the line 



208 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in Pownall, Vermont. The father, who 
was a farmer by occupation, came to Illi- 
nois in 1836 and purchased land in Kane 
county, after which he returned to the east 
and was married in that year or the year 
following. He then brought his bride to 
his new home in the wilderness, erecting a 
log house, in which they began their do- 
mestic life. The farm, comprising one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of wild land, purchased 
of Mr. Dewesse, was soon placed under a 
high state of cultivation, but in the mean- 
time the family endured all the hardships 
and privations incident to life on the front- 
ier. At that time Chicago was a mere ham- 
let, and the land on which the court house 
is now located could be bought for ten 
shillings per acre. The father took no act- 
ive part in public affairs aside from serving 
as school director in his district, which office 
was very important in those pioneer days. 
He died in 1889 at the age of seventy- six 
years, his wife a year later at the age of 
eighty-one. Both were earnest members of 
the Baptist church, with which he was offi- 
cially connected. Reared to habits of in- 
dustry and economy, they were always hard 
working people, and were thus well equipped 
for frontier life. 

In the family of this worthy couple were 
five children, namely: Emily, who died of 
cerebro-spinal meningitis when past the 
^age of thirty years; Homer, a resident of 
Dundee, and foreman of the condensing 
factory in Carpentersville; Jane, wife of Je- 
rome Irick, of Dundee; Edgar E., of this 
sketch; and Charles A., station agent at 
Dundee for the Chicago & Northwestern 
railroad. 

Upon the home farm at Dundee Edward 
E. Hoxie was reared until fifteen years of 
age, and then learned the trade of sash and 



blind making, which he followed at that 
place, in Elgin and in Chicago for sixteen 
years. He then entered the service of the 
Chicago & Northwestern railroad as fireman, 
and after being thus employed for four years, 
he was promoted engineer in 1881, com- 
pleting his seventeenth year in that capac- 
ity in July, 1898. During the twenty-one 
years he has been with the company, he 
has never been reprimanded or had any un- 
pleasant relations with them, which fact 
speaks volumes as to the faithful manner in 
which he has labored for their interests. 
He has never met with any serious accident, 
never had but one collision, which was not 
his fault, but the fault of the pay car, which 
ran into him; twice his engine has left the 
tracks, but no serious accident has hap- 
pened to himself. 

During the early part of the Civil war 
Mr. Hoxie enlisted for three months, in a 
call to guard prisoners from Fort Donelson 
and Shiloh, and after serving for four 
months, he returned home. In 1863 he 
enlisted in Company B, Sixty-ninth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, as corporal, and after- 
ward re-enlisted in Company I, Fifty-second 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He partici- 
pated in the Atlanta campaign, when the 
Union troops were almost constantly under 
fire for ninety days, and he was with Sher- 
man on his celebrated march to the sea, 
walking the entire distance. He was under 
the command of General Corse, who, after 
General Sherman signaled him to hold the 
fort at Altoona Pass, sent back the reply: 
" I am short a cheek bone and an ear, but 
able to whip the Rebs and all hell yet. " It 
will be remembered that Altoona Pass is in 
the vicinity of the town of Altoona, in 
northwestern Georgia. Here, on the 5th of 
October, 1864, occurred the battle made 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



209 



memorable by the gallant defense of Altoona 
by General John M. Corse, of the Federal 
army. General Sherman was occupying At- 
lanta, having garrisoned Altoona as his sec- 
ond base; this point the Confederates deter- 
mined to capture, and General S. G. French, 
under General Hood, was commissioned to 
accomplish the work. Sherman being in- 
formed of these designs, signaled from Ken- 
esaw Mountain to General Corse, stationed 
at Rome, to move with the utmost speed to 
Altoona and " hold the fort " against all op- 
position until he himself could arrive with 
aid. Here General Corse, with scarcely two 
thousand men, maintained the defense from 
nine in the morning until three in the after- 
noon against a large force of Confederate 
soldiers. At three General French sounded 
a retreat, and Altoona was saved. The 
proudest day of Mr. Hoxie's life was when 
he participated in the grand review at Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, at the close of 
the war. Fortunately, during the entire 
service he was never wounded or taken pris- 
oner, and when the war was over he was 
honorably discharged in Chicago, in July, 
1865. 

On the 3d of February, 1869, Mr. 
Hoxie was united in marriage with Miss 
Lucy Lown, daughter of George and Fanny 
Lown, who were from Dutchess county, 
New York, her father's farm bordering on 
the Hudson river in the town of Rhinebeck. 
Two children blessed this union: Maud, 
who was born December 18, 1870, and died 
March 20, 1883; and Mabel, who is attend- 
ing school in Elgin. 

Fraternally, Mr. Hoxie is an honored 
member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers, the Masonic order, and the 
Grand Army of the Republic. His political 
support is always given the men and meas- 



ures of the Republican party, and he takes 
quite an active interest in local affairs. As 
a citizen he commands the respect and es- 
teem of all who know him, and has a host 
of friends throughout his native county. 



JOHN A. LOGAN, whose name is insep- 
arably connected with the political his- 
tory of Elgin, served his fellow citizens as 
United States deputy marshal for four 
years and as alderman from the seventh 
ward of Elgin. He was born in that city 
August 9, 1 86 1, a son of John and Julia 
(Murphy) Logan, who were born, reared 
and married in County Cork, Ireland. On 
coming to the United States during the '505 
they located in Elgin, Illinois, where the 
father died about the close of the Civil war. 
On his emigration to America he was accom- 
panied by his father, Owen Logan, who, 
with his family settled in Elgin. In politics 
the father of our subject was a Democrat, 
and in religious belief was a Catholic, to 
which church his wife also belonged. She 
is now deceased. Their children were Mary, 
Nellie, Julia, Margaret, Thomas, John A. 
(ist), John A. (our subject), and Margaret 
(2d), all deceased with the exception of 
Thomas, a resident of Elgin, and our sub- 
ject. 

Reared in Elgin, John A. Logan, of this 
review, acquired his education in the public 
schools. On starting out in life for him- 
self he first worked in a brickyard, later was 
employed in a butter factory for two years, 
and in a cheese box factory for about four 
years. He then entered the service of the 
Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad, remaining 
with that company for about ten years, or 
until 1889, when he established a saloon in 
Elgin and successfully conducted the same 



2IO 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



for two years. In 1888 he was appointed 
deputy sheriff of Kane county under Will- 
iam H. Reed, and served in that capacity 
for four years. Since 1 894 he served as 
United States deputy marshal, and most 
ably and satisfactorily discharged the duties 
of that office. 

Mr. Logan was married in 1881, to Miss 
Mary A. Althen, a native of Sycamore, De- 
Kalb county, Illinois, and a daughter of 
Casper and Louise (Miller) Althen, natives 
of Germany. Two children bless this union, 
namely: Margaret and John. 

The Democratic party has always found 
in Mr. Logan a stanch supporter of its prin- 
ciples, and he is a recognized leader in local 
political affairs, being the present chairman 
of the Democratic committee of Elgin and 
a member of the senatorial committee. He 
has also been a delegate to many county, 
senatorial, congressional and state conven- 
tions, and is active and influential in the 
councils of his party. In 1886 he was first 
elected alderman from his ward for the 
short term, and at the two succeeding elec- 
tions was re-elected, serving continuously 
until 1891. In 1894 was again elected to 
the same position, and two years later was 
re-elected, being the- present incumbent, 
chairman of the railroad committee, and a 
member of the street lighting, fire and 
health committees. Socially he is a mem- 
ber of Lochiel lodge, K. P., of Elgin, and is 
also a Mason, belonging to the blue lodge 
of Elgin, and the Medina Temple and 
Oriential Consistory of Chicago. 



JOHN B. MOORE. Among the many 
who came to the grand prairie state in 
pioneer days, and who have been instru- 
mental in making it take the highest rank 



among its sister states of the Union, is the 
man whose name heads this sketch, who 
dates his residence in Illinois since Septem- 
ber 27, 1844. A native of New York, he 
was born at College Hill, Oneida county, 
July 26, 1815, and is the son of Shubel and 
Betsy (Watson) Moore, natives of New 
England, but who were among the pioneers 
of Oneida county, New York. The Moores 
are of Scottish descent. The family on 
leaving that country located for a time in 
Ireland and then came to the United States, 
first settling in Connecticut. Thomas Moore 
was a drover and furnished beef to the army 
during the Revolutionary war. 

Shubel Moore grew to manhood in Con- 
necticut, and was twice married, having 
five children by his first union. His second 
wife was Betsy Watson, the mother of our 
subject. She was born in Massachusetts, 
and was the daughter of Alexander Watson, 
a native of Middlesex county, that state, 
and a soldier of the Revolutionary war, who 
entered the service in July, 1776, when a 
lad of sixteen years. He participated in 
many important engagements during the 
struggle for independence. In 1793, he 
removed with his family to Herkimer coun- 
ty, New York, cleared off the timber, 
opened up a farm, and there spent the re- 
mainder of his life, dying April 6, 1840. 
His wife, Persis Watson, survived him some 
months, dying June 2, 1841. 

Shubel Moore moved to Oneida county, 
New York, at a very early day, locating on 
College Hill, where he purchased a partially 
improved place, which he converted into 
one of the best farms in that locality. He 
there died in 1820, when but forty-nine 
years old. His widow survived him many 
years, dying on the old homestead Decem- 
ber 1 8, 1859. After her husband's death, 




JOHN B. MOORE. 




MRS. J. B. MQORE, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



213 



she managed the farm and reared her fam- 
ily, doing by them as well as her means and 
opportunities afforded. She was a woman 
of good business ability, and it can be said 
of her as of one of old "she did what she 
could." On the death of her husband, 
there was quite an indebtedness on the 
place, which, with the aid of her sons, she 
in due time paid off, and later built a good, 
substantial residence. By his first wife 
Shubel Moore had four sons, Hiram, Miles, 
Ira and Frederick, and one daughter, Ma- 
tilda. By his second wife he had ten chil- 
dren: Persis, Caroline, Keziah, Maria, 
Thomas, John B., Bright Alexander, 
Shubel, -and two, Cornelia and Eliza, who 
died in infancy. Of this number, Johtr B. 
and Shubel are the only survivors, Shubel 
residing in Utica, New York. 

John B. Moore was but five years of age 
when his father died. He remained under 
the parental roof until attaining his seven- 
teenth year, assisting in the cultivation of 
the home farm. He then commenced to 
learn the carpenter's trade, which occupa- 
tion he followed for a number of years. 
While yet residing in New York, on the 
1 2th of March, 1839, he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Sophia Todd, born at Col- 
lege Hill, May 6, 1819. By this union 
were one son, and one daughter. Albert B., 
the son enlisted in 1862 in the Ninety-first 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, was taken pris- 
oner by the raider, Morgan, and was after- 
wards exchanged. He is now a farmer, re- 
siding in Jackson county, Kansas. The 
daughter, Adelaide, is now the wife of 
Andrew Schofield, of Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 

In 1844, Mr. Moore came to Illinois, 
by way of the Erie canal to Buffalo, and by 

the great lakes to Chicago. Moving on 
10 



west, he settled in Grundy county and there 
entered one hundred and forty acres of 
land, which he commenced to improve. 
Being without capital, for a time he en- 
gaged in contracting and building to pay 
for the land, and make other necessary im- 
provements. He continued to do more or 
less contracting and building for several 
years. As his means increased he bought 
more land, and at one time owned one 
thousand acres, comprising the farm on 
which he lived. In the early days he hauled 
his wheat and other grain to Chicago, the 
trip requiring two days each way. At night 
he slept under the wagon when the weather 
was not too severe. His wheat brought at 
different times from forty-eight cents to 
ninety-five cents per bushel. His trips to 
Ghjcago were with a wagon and two yoke 
of oxen, and he usually hauled fifty-two 
bushels at a time. 

While residing in Grundy county, Mrs. 
Sophia Moore died November 25, 1851. She 
had been a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church since reaching the age of thir- 
teen years. On the 25th of April, 1852, 
Mr. Moore .was united in marriage with Miss 
Lucy Sterling, a native of Michigan, born 
May 31, 1831. She is the daughter of 
Samuel and Cornelia (Lathrop) Sterling, 
natives of Connecticut, but who were married 
in New York, removed from thence to Mich- 
igan, and in 1834, to Kane county, Illinois. 
They located at Geneva, where Mr. Sterling 
bought a farm, and built the first hotel in 
the place. He also built the first dam and 
erected the first mill in Geneva. Mrs. 
Sterling was the first teacher in the place. 
After residing in the village for some years, 
Mr. Sterling removed to his farm, which is 
now owned and occupied by our subject, 
and there built a substantial stone residence. 



214 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



The last years of his life were spent on that 
farm, although his death occurred in Grundy 
county, at the residence of Mr. Moore, 
August 30, 1871, at the age of seventy-nine 
years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Moore, nine children 
have been born, as follows: Sterling, who 
died in infancy; George, who died at the 
age of twelve years; Shubel, a stockman, 
married, and residing in Jackson county, 
Kansas: Arabella, wife of Heiko Felkamp, 
of Great Bend, Kansas; Frederick, a farmer 
residing near Great Bend, Kansas; Mrs. 
Maria Fellows, residing in Jackson county, 
Kansas; Delia, wife of John Strader, a drug- 
gist of Geneva, Illinois; Emery T. , a farmer 
of St. Charles township; and John, who re- 
sides on the old homestead. 

After the death of Mr. Sterling, his 
homestead was put up at auction, and was 
purchased by Mr. Moore. It then com- 
prised one hundred and eighty-seven acres, 
to which Mr. Moore subsequently added 
three adjoining farms, making one of about 
seven hundred acres. For some years he 
engaged in its active management, but is 
now practically retired. He was one of the 
prime movers in the establishment of the 
factory at Geneva, and also the one at St. 
Charles. He later purchased the Geneva 
factory, but soon made it co-operative. It 
is now controlled by a stock company. In 
every enterprise calculated to advance the 
material interest of his adopted city and 
county, Mr. Moore has ever done his part. 

Politically, Mr. Moore is a life-long 
Democrat, being reared in the faith. He 
cast his first presidential ballot for Martin 
Van Buren, and has never since missed a 
presidential election and has always voted 
for the Democratic nominee. While resid- 
ing in Grundy county he served for a time 



as chairman of the Democratic central com- 
mittee. By his fellow citizens he was there 
elected to various local offices, including 
that of county commissioner. Since com- 
ing to Kane county he has steadily refused 
official position, preferring to give his un- 
divided time and attention to his extensive 
business interests. While not a member, 
he and his wife attend the Baptist church 
and contribute to its support. Mr. Moore 
is well-known throughout Kane and adjoin- 
ing counties, and by all who know him he 
is held in the highest esteem. 



HENRY G. SAWYER, of Carpenters- 
ville, Illinois, is one of the active and 
enterprising business men and manufactur- 
ers of Kane county. He. has been connect- 
ed with the Star Company since its organi- 
zation in 1873, and to him much of the 
credit is due for its prosperous condition. 
He was born in Elgin, Kane county, March 
21, 1844, and is the son of George E. Saw- 
yer, a native of Vermont, born at Bradford, 
October 17, 1815. John W. Sawyer, the 
grandfather, was also a native of Vermont, 
the family locating in that state at an early 
day. They are of English descent. 

George E. Sawyer grew to manhood in 
Vermont, and there married, January 5, 
1837, Abigail P. Blake, a native of New 
Hampshire, of which state her father, Hez- 
ekiah Blake, was a native. By trade Mr. 
Sawyer was a carpenter, which occupation 
he followed in early life. In April, 1837, 
with a one-horse wagon, he started from 
his Vermont home to Illinois, arriving in El- 
gin in October of the same year. In his 
wagon were his entire earthly possessions, 
but he came here with an earnest desire to 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



215 



better himself in life. At Elgin his wife 
had some friends, including a sister, Mrs. 
David Corliss, who located here the previ- 
ous year. Commencing work at his trade, 
he continued at that but a short time and 
then took up a claim of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Elgin township, which he 
later entered and subsequently sold and 
then purchased a farm in Dundee township, 
near the present village of Carpentersville, 
to which he removed and on which he re- 
sided for about thirty years. Leaving the 
farm, he removed to Carpentersville, where 
he died May 22, 1894, at the age of sev- 
enty-nine years. His wife passed away 
August 31, 1891. Their remains were laid 
to rest in the Dundee cemetery. They 
were the parents of two children William 
G., of Elgin, and our subject. 

Henry G. Sawyer grew to manhood in 
Kane county, received his primary educa- 
tion in its district schools and for a time at- 
tended the Elgin Academy. He remained 
"at home assisting his father in the cultiva- 
tion of the farm until twenty-two years of 
age, when in company with his brother he 
purchased the mercantile business of J. A. 
Carpenter, at Carpentersville, in which he 
continued for eight years. He then en- 
gaged in settling up the business and was 
employed as a commercial salesman. He 
was one of the charter members and stock- 
holders of the Star Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of which he was the first secretary 
and treasurer. That position he continued 
to occupy until 1896, when he was elected 
president of the company. This is one of 
the extensive enterprises in Kane county, its 
products being sent all over the northwest, 
including Indiana, Ohio and Pacific coast. 
The institution was started in a small way 
on small capital, but under the wise man- 



agement of Mr. Sawyer it has grown from 
year to year. 

On the yth of November, 1867, at Car- 
pentersville, Illinois, Mr. Sawyer was united 
in marriage with Miss Ella A. Brown, 
daughter of True and Lucinda Brown, the 
father being an old settler and substantial 
farmer of Kane county. She was born in 
New Hampshire, but came to this county 
with her parents in early childhood. Her 
death occurred in November, 1868, and 
Mr. Sawyer was again married March 23, 
1871, to Miss Mary Kingsley, a native of 
Illinois, born in Cook county, and the 
daughter of S. W. Kingsley, a native of 
Massachusetts, and came west by way of 
the New York and Erie canal and the great 
lakes. Settling in Barrington township in 
1840, he entered about four hundred acres 
of land, which he improved and on which 
he resided for many years, but is now liv- 
ing a retired life in Dundee. By this union 
were five children: Lora, now the wife of 
Charles H. Harvey, of Carpentersville; 
Bertha E., who married Robert Nightin- 
gale, Barrington, Cook county, but is now 
deceased; Clara, now a student of Dickson 
College; George K. and Addie K., twins. 
The latter died in infancy. The former is 
a student of the Illinois State University. 
The mother of these children died March 
25, 1879, and Mr. Sawyer, December 25, 
1880, married Lillian M. Burkitt, who was 
born and reared in Cook county, and a 
daughter of William Burkitt. By this mar- 
riage were three children. Clarence E., 
Ethel M. and Howard C. , all attending the 
home school. 

Politically Mr. Sawyer is a Republican 
and a strong believer in the principles of 
that party. While taking an active interest 
in political affairs, especially local politics, 



216 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



his .business interests have been such as to 
preclude his holding public office. Fra- 
ternally he is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Maccabees, and 
the Knights of the Globe, while Mrs. Sawyer 
is a member of the Daughters of the Globe. 
A lifelong resident of Kane county, Mr. 
Sawyer has gone in and out among its peo- 
ple, attending strictly to business, and is 
regarded as one of its valued citizens. Few 
men are better known throughout Kane and 
adjoining counties and he is held in the 
highest esteem by all. 



EZRA M. STARR, who is spending his 
declining years in ease and retirement 
at his pleasant home, No. 539 Ryerson 
avenue, Elgin, was born June 23, 1836, in 
Cattaraugus county, New York, of which 
state his parents, William B. and Sallie M. 
(Bailey) Starr, were also natives. There 
the father continued to engage in agricult- 
ural pursuits until 1860, when he emigrated 
to Kane county, Illinois, purchasing a farm 
in the town of Campton, where he made his 
home until called to his final rest in 1892, at 
the age of eighty-two years. He held mem- 
bership in the Universalist church, and was 
widely and favorably known throughout 
Kane county, having lived in several differ- 
ent localities. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
Samuel Starr, was born August 4, 1780, and 
died February 23, 1856. He served for 
three months in the war of 1812, being dis- 
charged at Sackett's Harbor, November 12, 
1814, and for his services he received aland 
warrant. He was in every way a most re- 
liable and excellent man and most capably 
filled the offices of township clerk and jus- 
tice of the peace. Religiously he was a con- 



sistent member of the Presbyterian church. 
He married Miss Catherine Wright, who 
was born May 10, 1783, and died April 7, 
1848. They reared a large family of chil- 
dren, but Mrs. Shaw, of Toledo, is the only 
one now living. Her husband was a pioneer 
of Lucas county, Ohio, and served as its 
first sheriff. 

The subject of this sketch is the oldest 
of five children, the others being as follows: 
William A., one of the early settlers of La- 
bette county, Kansas, died there at the age 
of thirty-five years, at which time he was 
serving as county auditor. He was also a 
successful teacher of that state, was quite 
an influential man, and was a most intimate 
friend of Senator Plum, of Kansas. Mil- 
lard F. is a resident of Rutland, Kane coun- 
ty, and has served as assessor and in other 
county offices. Lydia C. is the wife of 
Frank P. Shepard, of South Elgin. Arthur 
died in infancy. 

In the public schools of New York state, 
Ezra M. Starr acquired his education and 
upon the home farm early became familiar 
with the duties which fall to the lot of the 
agriculturist. He first came west in 1854, 
but later returned to New York. In 1857, 
however, he located in Ripon, Fond du Lac 
county, Wisconsin, where he worked at 
brick making for fifteen dollars per month 
and board, -remaining there two years. He 
then came to Hanover, Cook county, Illi- 
nois, where he worked by the month for two 
seasons, and in 1863 purchased two hun- 
dred acres of land in Elgin township, Kane 
county, of Virgil B. Bogue, Mrs. Starr's 
father, who was one of the early settlers of 
the county. Our subject successfully en- 
gaged in the operation of this farm until 
laying aside business cares after a long and 
useful career. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



217 



On the 7th of January, 1863, Mr. Starr 
was married to Miss Jane Clarissa Bogue, 
who was born on the farm in Kane county 
which her husband purchased of her father. 
Four children graced this union, namely: 
Gertrude M., wife of E. D. Wheeler, a trav- 
eling salesman residing in Elgin; Chester, a 
cattle dealer of Kane county; and Catherine 
and William Virgil, who are attending 
school. Catherine gives lessons on the vio- 
lin at the College of Music, Elgin, and well 
understands the art of bringing forth sweet 
strains from that favorite instrument. 

Mr. Starr is a progressive and enterpris- 
ing citizen, is broad and liberal in his views, 
and keeps well abreast with the times. He 
is quite domestic in his tastes, his greatest 
enjoyment being found in his home, and 
through his own efforts, he acquired a com- 
petence which now enables him to lay aside 
business cares and enjoy his quiet home life. 
Politically he is a stanch Republican, and 
he has served his fellow citizens as super- 
visor of his township two years and school 
director twenty years. 



LEVI S. STOWE. There is particular 
satisfaction in reverting to the life his- 
tory of the honored and venerable gentle- 
man whose name initiates this review, since 
his mind bears the impress of the historical 
annals of Kane county from early pioneer 
days, and for many years he has actively 
and prominently identified with the com- 
mercial and business interests of Elgin, in 
which city he is now living retired. 

Mr. Stowe was born June 24, 1826, in 
Granville, Washington county, New York, 
and is a son of Asahel and Lydia (Daven- 
port) Stowe. The father was born April 
24, 1795, and was the son of Cyrus Stowe, 



who was born July 16, 1769, a descendant 
oi Lord John Stowe, who on account of re- 
ligious persecution was driven out of Eng- 
land and came to America, settling in either 
Massachusetts or Vermont. At an early 
day members of the family removed to New 
York. The Davenports were also early 
settlers of that state, but little is known of 
their history. 

Leaving New York, Asahel Stowe, with 
his family, journeyed westward by team, 
and on the 28th of September, 1843, ar- 
rived in Elgin, Illinois, where his brother, 
Cyrus Stowe, had located three years previ- 
ously. Besides these two brothers, the 
other children were Polly E., Samuel, Han- 
nah, Edwin C. , William C., Parley W. and 
Wealthy B. Cyrus C. Stowe was an active 
and prominent member of the Congrega- 
tional church, of Elgin, in which he served 
as one of the first deacons. The children 
born to Asahel and Lydia (Davenport) 
Stowe were as follows: William H. ; Louise 
J., wife of Jesse Rose; Marilla, wife of 
Theodore Cowen; Levi S.; Rebecca L., 
wife of Monroe Hammon; Electa and Eve- 
line, who both died in childhood; Albert, 
deceased; Edwin, deceased; Martha, widow 
of William Battles. Of these, only five are 
now living: Levi S. ; Henry; and Louise, 
of Martin county, Minnesota; Rebecca, of 
Michigan; and Martha, of Marseailles, Illi- 
nois. The mother of these children died in 
Conewango, Cattaraugus county, New York, 
in 1841, the father in Sycamore, Illinois, in 
June, 1859. In religious belief he was a 
Congregationalist, and in politics a Whig, 
until 1856, when he became a Republican. 

On coming west with the family, Levi 
S. Stowe found employment in Elgin at 
chopping wood for twenty-five cents per 
cord, and subsequently he went to De Kalb 



218 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



county, where he engaged in farming for 
about three years. The following three 
years were spent in farming and lumbering 
in Wisconsin, and on his return to Illinois 
he located in Sycamore, where he remained 
for one year. After passing a year at St. 
Charles, he came to Elgin, where he first 
conducted a restaurant, and then opened a 
general store on Chicago street in the build- 
ing now occupied by the Barclay hardware 
firm, carrying on general merchandise very 
successfully there for almost a quarter of a 
century. Since selling out his store in 1881, 
he has practically lived retired. Besides 
his own pleasant home at No. 56 Villa 
street, he owns considerable real estate, in- 
cluding residence property in the city which 
he rents. 

Mr. Stowe was married October 26, 
1852, to Miss Jane E. Holgate, of Elgin, 
Kane county, who was born in Franklin 
county, New York, April 27, 1833, a daugh- 
ter of Rev. Ozem and Angeline (Safford) 
Holgate. She died in Elgin on the 6th of 
July, 1855, a worthy member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, of which her father 
was a minister. On October 3, 1857, Mr. 
Stowe was again married, his second union 
being with Miss Betsy Lessenden, who was 
born in 1835, a daughter of Ephraim and 
Caroline (Anderson) Lessenden, natives of 
Sheerness, Kent county, England. In 1849 
they became residents of Kane county, Illi- 
nois, where the father engaged in farming 
many years, and both died in Elgin in 1895. 
They were earnest and faithful members of 
the Methodist church. Of their five chil- 
dren, John is now a resident of Osawatomie 
county, Kansas; Sarah, born in 1832, mar- 
ried Edwin Stowe, and both died leaving 
two sons, Sherman and Warren, residents 
of Elgin; Mrs. Betsy Stowe is next in order 



of birth ; George is a resident of Osawatomie, 
Kansas; and Jane is the wife of Milton 
Townsend. 

In his political views Mr. Stowe is a 
Republican, and has ever taken a deep and 
commendable interest in public affairs, giv- 
ing his support to all measures which he be- 
lieves calculated to prove of public benefit. 
He is one of the few early merchants of El- 
gin now living, and with the growth and up- 
building of the place he has been prominent- 
ly identified. His wife holds membership 
in the Congregational church, and they have 
the respect and esteem of all who know 
them. 

HENRY J. GAHAGAN, M. D. , is a skilled 
physician and surgeon of Elgin, whose 
knowledge of the science of medicine is 
broad and comprehensive, and whose ability 
in applying its principles to the needs of 
suffering humanity has gained him an envi- 
able prestige in professional circles. A na- 
tive of Grafton, Illinois, born December 27, 
1866, he is of Irish lineage. His paternal 
grandfather, a native of the Emerald Isle, 
having emigrated to America, died in New 
York at the age of one hundred and four 
years. His wife passed away in Ireland at 
the age of seventy. 

The Doctor's father, Bernard Gahagan, 
was born in County Sligo, Ireland, and on 
coming to America located near Lake Cham- 
plain, New York, whence he afterward re- 
moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota. Later 
he floated down the Mississippi river on a 
raft and became one of the pioneer settlers 
of Jersey county, Illinois, locating at Graf- 
ton, where he lived for many years. He 
was a contractor and builder by occupation. 
He married Ellen Armstrong, also a native 
of County Sligo, Ireland, as was her father, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



219 



who crossed the Atlantic to America in an 
early day, and spent the remainder of his 
life in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gahagan became the parents of seven 
children, four sons and three daughters, four 
of whom are now living: Michael, of Tus- 
can, Arizona; Bernard, who is living in New 
York city; Henry J. ; and Kate, wife of 
Simon Conroy, of Grafton, Illinois. The 
father of this family passed away in 1881 
at the age of fifty-four years, and the mother's 
death occurred several years before. Both 
were members of the Roman Catholic 
church. 

The Doctor was reared in his native 
town, was graduated in the high school 
there, and later attended a private school in 
Chicago. He also pursued a private course 
in medicine for two years, and in 1890 
matriculated in the Rush Medical College 
of that city, in which institution he was 
graduated in 1893. During that time he 
had charge of the surgical instruments de- 
partment of the Cook county hospital. 

On leaving Chicago Dr. Gahagan ac- 
cepted the position of assistant physician in 
the Eastern Illinois Hospital for the Insane, 
at Kankakee, and a few months later, at his 
own request, was transferred to the North- 
ern Illinois Hospital for the Insane, at Elgin, 
having charge of the annex building until 
April i, 1897. He then opened an office in 
Elgin for private practice and has already 
succeeded in establishing a good business. 
On the 2Oth of May, 1897, he was appointed 
city physician. He is already popular with 
Elgin's citizens as an able physician and his 
practice is constantly increasing in volume 
and importance. As he is yet a young man 
and possesses enterprise and laudable ambi- 
tion, a successful future is undoubtedly be- 
fore him. 



The Doctor was married August 12, 
1893, to Miss Delia Cullen, daughter of 
William and Ellen (Conners) Cullen. They 
have one child, Edna. The parents are 
members of the Roman Catholic church, 
and the Doctor is a valued member of the 
Knights of Pythias fraternity of Elgin, in 
which he is now serving as chancellor com- 
mander. He is a medical examiner of the 
male and female Catholic Order of Forest- 
ers, Elgin court No. 137, St. Regina court 
No. 92, and of courts located at Elburn, 
Batavia, St. Charles, Huntley and Rutland, 
and belongs to Silver Leaf camp, Modern 
Woodmen of America; the Columbus Club, 
of Chicago; the Fox River Valley Medical 
Association, being chairman of its executive 
committee; the Illinois Medical Society and 
a charter member of the Association of As- 
sistant Physicians of Hospitals for the In- 
sane. In his political predilections he is a 
Democrat, but has never sought official 
preferment, desiring rather to give his en- 
tire time and attention to his profession, in 
which he is winning a desirable reputation. 



JUDGE JOHN W. RANSTEAD, who has 
attained distinctive prestige at the bar of 
Kane county, was born in Udina, Kane 
county, Illinois, June 14, 1843, and is a 
representative of one of the most prominent 
and honored old families in this section of 
the state. His great-grandfather was one 
of the heroes of the Revolution and fell at the 
battle of Bennington, giving his life for the 
cause of his country. The grandfather of 
the Judge was John Ranstead, a native of 
New Hampshire, and his son John was also 
born in the Granite state. The latter mar- 
ried Mercy West, a native of Vermont, and 
a daughter of Albert West, whose birth also 



22O 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



occurred there. He studied for the medical 
profession but died in early life. In 1837, 
John Ranstead, father of the Judge, came 
with his family to Kane county, Illinois, lo- 
cating in Udina, where he carried on agri- 
cultural pursuits. His ability for leadership 
made him one of the prominent citizens of 
the community and he was honored by an 
election to the state legislature, serving in 
the years 1852 and 1853. He died in 1868 
at the age of sixty-five years, and his wife, 
who was a member of the Methodist church, 
passed away in 1895, a * the advanced age 
of seventy-eight years. Their family num- 
bered one son and two daughters, the latter 
being Julia W., now deceased, and Sarah, 
wife of G. H. Britton, of Udina. 

Judge Ranstead was reared on his father's 
farm in Kane county, and in early life at- 
tended an old-time subscription school. He 
afterward pursued his studies in the public 
schools and Elgin Academy, leaving the last 
named institution in 1858 to enter Lombard 
University at Galesburg, Illinois, where he 
continued his studies until 1863. Having 
determined to enter the legal profession he 
matriculated in the law department of Mich- 
igan University and was graduated in the 
class of 1866. 

In 1868 Mr. Ranstead came to Elgin, 
where he opened a law office. His success 
at the bar was marked and immediate, and 
the confidence reposed in him by his fellow- 
townsmen was indicated in 1873 by his 
election to the office of county judge, in 
which capacity he served for nine consecu- 
tive years, discharging his duties with marked 
fairness and displaying in his decisions a 
comprehensive knowledge of the science of 
jurisprudence. Since his retirement from 
the bench he has engaged in private practice 
and has an extensive clientage which has 



connected him with much of the important 
litigation of the district during his affiliation 
with the Elgin bar. He is also a director 
in the Home Savings Bank and is the presi- 
dent of the Home National Bank. 

On the 2nd of April, 1867, the Judge 
wedded Miss Eugenia A. Fuller, a daughter 
of Rev. J. P. and Adeline (Cady) Fuller, of 
Galesburg, Illinois, both natives of Con- 
necticut. One child graces this union 
Janet M. The Judge and his wife attend 
the Universalist church, and in his social 
relations he is a Master Mason and a mem- 
ber of the Elgin Waltonian Club and the 
Black Hawk Club. His political support 
has always been given the Democracy, and 
of the principles of the party he is a stanch 
advocate. His entire life has been passed 
in Kane county, and his useful and honor- 
able career commends him to the confidence 
of all. In his profession he has won the 
success which only close application and 
earnest purpose can bring, and in private 
life he has gained the respect which is ever 
accorded genuine worth. 



ANTON F. SCHADER. Germany has 
furnished to the New World many of 
her best and most useful citizens. It has 
furnished not only needed workmen, skilled 
and unskilled, but enterprising merchants, 
manufacturers, artists and apt dealers upon 
our marts of trade. It has also naturally 
embraced the various professions, where 
these German-Americans prove themselves 
useful, talented and influential. Among 
Elgin's leading citizens is Anton F. Schader, 
native of the Fatherland, who is now the 
well-known and populareditorof the "Week- 
ly Herald," and the " Germania. " 

He was born April 24, 1868, in Mayence, 




A. F, SCHADER, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



223 



Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany, of which place 
his parents, Frank and Anna (Haas) 
Schader, are still residents. The father was 
born in Worms, Germany, in 1 844, a son 
of Frank Schader, Sr., while the mother 
was born in Bodenheim, Germany, in 1846, 
a daughter of Anton Haas, a school teacher, 
whose father, who was also a school teacher, 
bore the same name. The father of our 
subject is a well educated man, of scholarly 
tastes, who has for many years been profes- 
sor of mathematics in the schools of May- 
ence. Anton F. is the oldest of his four 
children, the others being Frank, who is 
with his brother and is now serving as assist- 
ant editor; Lina, wife of Jacob Wollweberi 
of Mayence, Germany, and Elizabeth, who 
is still with her parents. 

Anton F. Schader began "his education 
in a private school, later attended the 
gymnasium at Mayence, and also took up 
the study of languages. After leaving col- 
lege he studied pharmacy and chemistry at 
a pharmaceutical institution, and then went 
to Darmstadt with the view of preparing for 
that profession, but was obliged to give up 
his plans on account of ill health. In 1887 
he entered the German army after having 
passed an examination which required of him 
to serve only one year. He entered the 
artillery service as a private, but at the end 
of six months was promoted to assistant 
corporal, and before the end of his year was 
made a non-commissioned officer. He suc- 
cessfully passed an examination for the rank 
of lieutenant, but at the end of his time, 
resigned his position in the army. 

In the fall of 1888 Mr. Schader began 
traveling over Europe for pleasure and in- 
struction, and in April, 1889, sailed for the 
United States, arriving in New York on the 
24th of that month. He remained in that 



city until May, 1891, and then came to 
Elgin, Illinois, accepting the position of 
editor of the Elgin "Deutsche Zeitung. " 
About two months after his arrival the 
proprietor, Mr. Kramer, went to Europe, 
leaving him in charge. Upon his return 
Mr. Schader, in connection with Otto May, 
started a paper of his own " The Herold " 
which he has successfully published since 
1891.. They began in a small way, at first 
having the paper printed in Chicago, but 
meeting with success they enlarged the busi- 
ness, and in 1895 Mr. Schader purchased 
his partner's interest, being now sole pro- 
prietor. " The Herold " is now home-print- 
,,ed, and is a seven-column quarto published 
every Saturday, while the " Germania " is 
issued on Wednesday. Both papers have a 
very good circulation, and are proving quite 
profitable. They have a better advertising 
patronage than any weekly in the county. In 
connection with the regular plant Mr. Scha- 
der has a job printing office, where first-class 
work is done in both German and English. 
There are now seven employees in the 
office. 

On the 29th of September, 1892, in 
Elgin, Mr. Schader was united in marriage 
with Miss Anna M. Muetterries, a native of 
Westphalia, Germany, who, when a little 
child, was brought to the United States by 
her parents, Conrad and Catherine Muetter- 
ries. Two children grace this union, namely, 
Anna and May. 

In his political views Mr. Schader is a 
Republican, and gives his personal influence 
and support of his papers to the financial 
policy of that party. Being a young man 
of excellent education, he is well fitted for 
the profession he now follows, and is most 
ably conducting his journals. He is also 
serving as notary public. Socially he is a 



224 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



member of the Royal Arcanum, the Knights 
of the Maccabees, the Foresters, and the 
Order of Mutual Protection, being president 
of the last named. In 1897 he returned to 
Germany, visiting his old home, relatives 
and friends. 



AMASA WIGHTMAN LOOMIS, residing 
on section 29, Elgin township, was 
born in the town of Sangerfield, Oneida 
county, New York, May 12, 1818, and is 
the son of Alvin and Wealthy (Wightman) 
Loomis, the former a native of Wethers- 
field, Connecticut, and the latter of the 
town of New Berlin, Ottego county, New 
York. Alvin Loomis was born in August, 
1781, and lived in Connecticut until the age 
of twenty-five years, when he emigrated to 
the wilds of central New York, locating in 
Oneida county. In his youth he served as 
a sailor for a time and was once taken 
prisoner by the French, then fighting under 
the great Napoleon. In Oneida county he 
purchased a farm and engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits, dying there in 1856, at 
the age of seventy-six years. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
Stephen Loomis, served through the Revolu- 
tionary war as teamster. He furnished his 
own teams and hauled provisions to the 
various camps of American soldiers. During 
the winter, when nothing could be done, he 
returned to his home in Connecticut, and in 
the early spring again engaged in transport- 
ing provisions. At the close of the war he 
was paid in continental money, which de- 
preciated until it became utterly worthless. 
He died at an advanced age. The Loomis 
family were among the first to settle in 
Connecticut. 

The subject of this sketch remained 



upon the home farm until the age of 
eighteen years, assisting in its cultivation, 
and as the opportunity was afforded him 
attended the Waterville Academy. On 
leaving home he worked by the month on 
farms in New York, until coming west in 
1846. Previous to this time his brothers, 
Hemen and Amenzo, came west, the former 
locating in Burlington, Wisconsin, and the 
latter at Half Bay, Lake county, Illinois. 
In 1842 Amenzo took up a claim of one 
hundred and twenty acres for our subject 
near Half Bay, and land was inspected by 
him in the fall of 1844, when he came west 
and remained one month. In 1846 he 
located upon his farm at Half Bay where 
he resided until 1850, when he went to 
California, taking passage on the steamer 
Illinois at New York city, for Aspinwall. At 
Panama he found all passage by steamer 
engaged many months ahead. Securing 
passage in a schooner he sailed for San 
Francisco, but the vessel was driven far out 
of its course and very nearly wrecked on a 
sharp needle of rock, rising from the ocean. 
He reached San Francisco July i, being 
nearly two months in making the voyage. 
During the first year of his stay in Cali- 
fornia, he prospected with varying success. 
In 1851 he did much better, and continued 
to do fairly well until 1853, when he re- 
turned home with some "dust," though not 
a fortune. 

In 1854 Mr. Loomis sold the Half Bay 
farm and purchased two hundred and forty- 
seven acres of G. W. Raymond, in Han- 
over township, Cook county. In 1864, he 
bought one hundred and sixty acres in Plato 
township, near Plato Centre, which he sold 
in 1882, and bought his present farm of one 
hundred and ninety acres in sections 29, 32 
and 33, Elgin township. The farm is de- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



225 



voted to grain and dairying purposes, on 
which he raises about two thousand bush- 
els of corn each year. He usually keeps 
about thirty-three head of milk cows. Fire 
destroyed all his farm buildings, November 
5, 1893, since which time he has erected 
all the buildings on the place, which, 
though not large, are well adapted to the 
purposes for which they are used. 

Mr. Loomis was married, October 18, 
1859, to Mrs. Julia A. Jones, widow of 
William Jones, whom she married in 1845, 
and who died in 1856, leaving four chil- 
dren, only one of whom is now living, 
Franklin Jones, superintendent of the Ter- 
minal Railroad in Missouri. Mrs. Loomis 
was born October 2, 1824, and is the 
daughter of Judge Joshua Carmen and 
Almeda (Moore) Morgan, natives of Con- 
necticut. 

Judge Morgan was the son of Isaac Mor- 
gan, a soldier of the Revolutionary war, 
and a pensioner of that war, and who died 
at the age of seventy-four years. Isaac 
Morgan married Margaret Carmen, a 
daughter of Rev. Joshua Carmen, a pio- 
neer Baptist preacher. The Morgans are 
of Welsh descent. In early life Judge 
Morgan moved to Ohio, and, later, to San- 
gamon county, Illinois, where he served as 
county judge. He also held that position 
until his death, after removal to Tremont, 
Tazewell county. He served in the Black 
Hawk war, and at Starved Rock found a 
tomahawk, which was probably left by one 
of the Illini Indians starved there. The 
relic was preserved in the family for many 
years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Loomis six children 
were born, as follows: Elizabeth, who died 
at the age of two years; Elmer Ellsworth, 
who died aged one year; Grant, who died 



when three months old; Amasa Sherman, 
who died at the age of six years; Alvin, who 
married Rose Emory, of St. Louis, by 
whom he has two children, Edna Belle and 
Lilian Jennett; and Benjamin Franklin, 
who married Ellen . Suttle, of Evansville, 
Indiana, by whom he, has one child, Mabel 
Julia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Loomis are members of 
the Congregational church, in the work of 
which they are much interested. Politic- 
ally, he is a Republican, with which party 
he has been connected ever since its organ- 
ization. While taking an interest in polit- 
ical affairs it has never run in the direction 
of office seeking, and he has held but one 
local office, that of school director. A 
man of the strictest honor and integrity, he 
is esteemed for his many excellent traits of 
character. 



/CHARLES A. GRONBERG, of Aurora, 
V-> Illinois, is a representative of the 
Swedish-Americans of Kane county, which 
has been his home since 1854. He is a na- 
tive of Sweden, born May 23, 1837, and is 
the son of Charles P. and Johanna (Hem- 
ming) Gronberg, both of whom were also 
natives of Sweden, and who emigrated to 
this country in 1853, locating first in Chi- 
cago. The father was a machinist by trade, 
and in 1854 moved to Geneva, and found 
employment in the reaper factory, at that 
place. Three years later he moved to Au- 
rora, started a factory, and engaged in the 
manufacture of reapers. He carried on 
business in Aurora, until 1872, when he 
moved to Elgin, and there engaged in the 
same business. His death occurred in El- 
gin about 1 88 1, his good wife dying some 
twenty years previously. Of their family 



226 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of five sons and one daughter, John was a 
soldier in the Thirty-sixth Regiment, Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry, and now resides in 
Evanston, Illinois; Otto was a member of 
the Fifty-second Regiment, Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, and after the war served for 
years as chief engineer at the asylum at 
Elgin, but is now deceased; Christine, wife 
of Charles Barlow, a merchant tailor of 
Aurora; Oscar, an employee of the Elgin 
Watch Factory; and Gustave, also in the 
watch factory at Elgin. 

The boyhood and youth of our subject 
were spent in his native land, and when 
about sixteen years old, he came with his 
parents to America. In the old country he 
had good educational advantages in his own 
language, and also in the German tongue. 
On coming to this country, he attended 
school at Geneva and Montgomery, that he 
might acquire the English language. With 
his father he learned the trade, and also 
drawing, becoming a superior draughtsman. 
He worked in the factory with his father, 
and also in the shops in Aurora with him, 
and later in the car shops at Aurora. In 
1886 he went to Pullman, Illinois, as fore- 
man in the machine shops at that place, 
continuing there until 1893, since which 
time he has lived retired. While in Pull- 
man he still maintained his residence in 
Aurora. 

Mr. Gronberg was married in Rockford, 
Illinois, in 1862, to Miss Charlotte Lin- 
guist, a native of Sweden, where she was 
reared and educated. By this union were 
two daughters, Alma and Esther Iliana. 
The former holds a position with the Prang 
Educational Company, of Chicago. The 
latter also holds a position in a business 
house in Chicago. Immediately after mar- 
riage, Mr. and Mrs. Gronberg located in 



Aurora, and two years later he built a resi- 
dence on River street, where they resided 
about eighteen years. He then erected his 
present residence on 233 West Park avenue, 
and since 1882 it has been their home. 

Politically Mr. Gronberg is a steadfast 
Republican, with which party he has been 
identified since casting his first presidential 
ballot for Abraham Lincoln, in 1860. He 
is a member of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, of which body his wife is also a 
member. Fraternally he is a Master Mason. 
As a citizen he has ever been willing to do 
his part, to advance the material interests 
of his adopted city and county. For forty- 
four years he has gone in and out among 
the people of Kane county, with whom he 
is held in the highest respect. 



FRED R. BRILL, the efficient postmas- 
ter of Hampshire, Kane county, Illi- 
nois, was born in Shaumburg, Cook county, 
Illinois, January 5, 1870, and with his par- 
ents came to Hampshire in 1876. Here he 
attended the village school until the age 
of fourteen, then worked in a grist-mill 
for his father for three years, and then 
he entered the office of the Hampshire 
"Register," under the control of G. E. 
Sisley, and after thoroughly mastering 
the trade and having also considerable ex- 
perience in editorial work, in 1889, in part- 
nership with C. H. Backus, they purchased 
the plant and continued the publication of 
the paper, with our subject as editor until 
1892, when he purchased Mr. Backus' in- 
terest and alone continued its publication. 
Having received the appointment as post- 
master of Hampshire, on July i, 1897, he 
took his brother, William C. Brill, into 
partnership, and the duties of editor and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



227 



manager devolved upon the junior member. 
One year later the plant was leased to Will- 
iam C. Brill, who is now in full control of 
the paper. 

Mr. Brill was married in Hampshire, to 
Miss Nellie M. Backus, a native of Chap- 
lain, Connecticut, and a daughter of Jirah 
L. Backus, of which further mention is 
made in the sketch of C. H. Backus, found 
elsewhere in this work. Although deprived 
of as extensive schooling as he desired, Mr. 
Brill through the educational advantages of 
his profession, made up that deficiency, and 
ambitious of learning, has completed the 
Chautauqua course and pursued independ- 
ent study, until he is possessed of a liberal 
education, which is above the average. He 
is fond of good books and knows how to use 
them. 

In politics Mr. Brill is a stanch Republic- 
an and is a local leader in politics. He 
has attended various county, district, state 
and national conventions of his party, and 
in the great convention at St. Louis in 
1896, in which William McKinley was nom- 
inated for President, he served as assistant 
sergeant-at-artns. For six years prior to 
his appointment as postmaster he served as 
clerk of the village and township. Frater- 
nally he is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of the 
Globe, Modern Woodmen of America and 
Royal Neighbors. In each of these orders 
he has filled nearly ail the official chairs. 

John Brill, the father of our subject, was 
born in the village of Abterote, Hessen 
Cassel, Germany, April 27, 1831. He is 
the son of Martin Brill, also a native of 
Germany, who followed farming and lime 
burning in the old country, where his entire 
life was spent, he dying in 1849, at the age 
of about fifty years. John Brill attended 



the common and Latin schools in Germany, 
until the age of fourteen. For some years 
he lived in Albungen, where he married 
Martha Seppel, a native of that city, and in 
1851 they emigrated to America, sailing 
March i from Bremen, on the sailing vessel 
Victoria, and after a voyage of six weeks 
landed at Baltimore. From that city he 
came west to Chicago, where he lived one 
month, and then located at Hoosier Grove, 
Cook county, where he followed his trade of 
shoemaking six years. In 1875, he moved 
to Hampshire, followed his trade a short 
time, and then engaged in other lines of 
business for six years. In 1883 he bought 
the mill at Hampshire, and ran the same 
until 1896, when he sold out and retired, 
and is now living in a comfortable home in 
the northern part of the village. 

William C. Brill, the brother and part- 
ner of our subject in 1897-8, was born in 
Hampshire, April 24, 1875, and received his 
education in the village schools, graduating 
from the high school at the age of seven- 
teen. Since boyhood he worked in his 
father's mill during vacation, and when out 
of school. He became an expert engineer, 
and passed the state examination for an en- 
gineer's certificate, before attaining the age 
required for such certificate. Having also 
spent much spare time in his brother's 
printing office, he learned type-setting and 
press work, so when his father sold his mill 
in 1895, William C. entered the printing 
office, and, as Before stated, became a part- 
ner in the publication of the paper in 1897. 

In addition to the work in the office of 
the "Register," he had some experience in 
editorial work elsewhere. While Mr. G. E. 
Sisley, of the " Genoa Issue," was absent, 
attending to his duties as clerk of the state 
senate, he did editorial work on his paper. 



228 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



He was also employed three or four months 
on the " Harvard Herald." A ready and 
fluent writer, he is making of the " Regi- 
ter" a No. i home paper. Fraternally he 
is a member of the Knights of the Globe, 
and politically he is a Republican. 



SIMON P. BROWN, M. D., is recog- 
nized as one of the leading physicians 
of Kane county. His office is room 18, 
Spurling Block, Elgin, and he has been a 
resident of the city since 1874, during which 
time he has built up an extensive practice. 
He is a native of New Hampshire, born in 
Concord, June 11, 1832, and is a son of 
Manley H. and Hannah (Martin) Brown, 
the former a native of Vermont, and the 
latter of New Hampshire. 

The Browns are of English descent, the 
first representative of the family coming to 
this country early in the seventeenth cen- 
tury, locating in Providence, Rhode Island. 
Rudolphus Brown, the paternal grandfather 
of our subject, was a native of Orange coun- 
ty, Vermont, and died at the place where 
he was born and reared. By occupation he 
was a farmer. Of his family of fifteen chil- 
dren, Manly H., our subject's father, was 
the youngest. Jacob Martin, the maternal 
grandfather, was a native of Scotland. On 
coming to this country he located in New 
Hampshire, and on the farm selected on his 
arrival lived, and died at the age of about 
seventy-six years. 

Manley H. Brown grew to manhood in 
his native state, and there learned the tan- 
ner and currier trade. He was a man of 
more than ordinary ability, and while living 
in the east served as captain of a company 
in the state militia, and also served as 
justice of the peace. His marriage with 



Hannah Martin was celebrated while living 
in New Hampshire in 1831. With a laud- 
able desire to better himself and give his 
children better opportunities to advance in 
this world, he came west with his family in 
1843, ar "d located on a farm in Du Page 
county. His ability was soon recognized by 
his neighbors, and in 1846 he was elected a 
member of the legislature from Du Page 
county, but died the same year before tak- 
ing his seat, while in his thirty-seventh year. 
His wife died in 1840. They were the par- 
ents of four sons and one daughter, of whom 
our subject is the oldest. 

Simon Preston Brown was eleven years 
of age when he accompanied his parents 
west. While in his native state he attended 
the public schools, and on coming to Illi- 
nois he attended first the Warrenville Acad- 
emy and later entered Wheaton College, 
where he pursued his studies about two 
years. In 1856 he began studying medicine 
at Danby, Illinois, with Drs. Newton and 
Potter, and in 1860 entered Rush Medical 
College, Chicago, graduating from that in- 
stitution in the spring of 1868. 

On receiving his diploma Dr. Brown 
went to Arlington Heights, Illinois, where 
he opened an office and commenced the 
practice of his profession. He continued 
there with good success for eight years, 
and then went to Polatine where he re- 
mained two years. Desiring a more ex- 
tended field he came to Elgin, where he 
has now been some twenty-four years. 
While engaged in general practice, he has 
made a specialty of diseases of Women, 
and on that subject is an acknowledged 
authority. His practice has been for years 
a large and extensive one, and his success 
has been such as to warrant it. 

On the isth of October, 1863, Dr. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



229 



Brown was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Hitchcock, of DuPage county, daugh- 
ter of Earl and Mary (Miller) Hitchcock. 
By this union seven children have been born, 
namely: Frank died June 3, 1892; Kate 
died November 15, 1894; Harriet Ann is 
now the wife of George E. Haskell, of 
Grand Junction, Colorado; William is at 
home; Georgia and Mary Jeannette both 
died in infancy; and Cora J. is at home. 

The Doctor and his wife are members of 
the Universalist church, of Elgin, and fra- 
ternally he is a member of Palatine lodge, 
F. & A. M.; Palatine chapter, R. A. M.; 
and Chicago consistory. Politically he is 
a Democrat, and while he takes that inter- 
est in political affairs that all patriotic 
American citizens should take, he has never 
sought official position, perferring to give 
his time to his professional duties. Profes- 
sionally he is a member of the Fox River 
Medical Association, and in its work has 
taken an active interest. 

The Doctor resides with his family in a 
comfortable home at No. 402 North Spring 
street, Elgin. He has been prospered in a 
financial way, and in addition to his city 
residence has a fine farm of two hundred 
and thirty-four acres five miles south of 
Elgin, and one near Palatine, Cook county, 
of two hundred and twenty acres. A resi- 
dent of the state a period of fifty-five long 
years, and a practitioner of thirty years, he 
has been brought in contact with the best 
people of Cook, DuPage and Kane counties, 
and his friends are numerous in each. By 
all who know him he is held in the highest 
esteem. 



SAMUEL SWITZER, section 15, St. 
Charles township, is actively engaged 
in farming and in dairying, two and a half 



miles north of the city of St. Charles. He is 
numbered among the settlers of 1 849, and is a 
native of Canada, born near Toronto, May 8, 
1829. He is the son of Joseph Switzer, a 
native of Ireland, who went to Canada a 
young man, with his father, Samuel Switzer, 
who settled near Toronto. He there mar- 
ried Selina Switzer, a native of New Jersey, 
but reared in Canada. They were the par- 
ents of ten children, all of whom grew to 
mature years, save one. In order of birth 
they are as follows: Samuel, of this review; 
Martin, a farmer residing in St. Charles 
township; Charles, of St. Charles; Sarah, 
wife of E. W. Blackman, of Elgin; Mary 
Ann, wife of I. C. Towner, of Elgin; Eliza- 
beth, who married Stephen Gates, is now 
deceased; Russell, who resides with our 
subject; William H., a farmer residing in 
California; and Jabez, who resides in Pin- 
gree Grove, Illinois. 

In 1849, Joseph Switzer came to Illi- 
nois, and located in St. Charles township, 
Kane county, Illinois, where he purchased 
a farm of over four hundred acres, and here 
died in 1853. His wife died in Canada, 
just previous to his removal to the States. 
Samuel Switzer, our subject, was twenty 
years old when he came with the family to 
Kane county In his native country, he re- 
ceived a fairly good education in the 
Churchville Academy. He remained on the 
farm with his father, until the latter's death. 
On the sixteenth of June, 1853, in Kane 
county, he married Harriet Louisa Towner, 
a native of Lower Canada, born near Mont- 
real, where she remained until sixteen years 
of age, when she came to Kane county, her 
father, William A. Towner, and family 
coining several years after her arrival. His 
last days were spent at the residence of 
his son in Elgin. By this union are six 



230 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



living children as follows: Philene M., wife 
of M. W. Stanhope, of Elgin; Joseph E. , 
married and is a contractor residing in St. 
Charles; Florilla, wife of Walter Hare, of 
St. Charles, Illinois; Mary S., wife of 
Donald McDonald, of Brookwalter, Pawnee 
county, Nebraska; Hattie M., wife of C. 
Arthur Purcell, of New Haven, Connecticut; 
and Nellie M., wife of George Simmons, 
who is assisting in managing the home 
farm. They have lost three sons and two 
daughters Henry C. , who grew to the age 
of twenty-two years; I. C. , who died at the 
age of eighteen; Grant, who died in child- 
hood; Kate C. , who died at the age of four- 
teen years; and Alice. Belle, who died in 
childhood. They are also the grandparents 
of ten children. 

Soon after marriage, Mr. Switzer located 
on a part of the old homestead, having suc- 
ceeded to one hundred acres. After re- 
maining upon that place three years, he sold 
out and moved to Palatine, Cook county, 
Illinois, where he purchased a farm and 
there remained twelve years. About 1867, 
he came back to Kane county, and purchased 
the farm where he now resides, which since 
coming into his possession has been greatly 
improved. Since residing here he has built 
a large residence, three good barns, erected 
a pump and wind mill for grinding feed, and 
otherwise improved the place, making it one 
of the best farms on Fox River, on which it 
is located. For some years he has been 
principally engaged in dairying and has kept 
on an average about thirty cows. 

Since 1856, when he gave his support to 
John C. Fremont, he has voted the Repub- 
lican ticket at every presidential election. 
While always interested in political affairs, 
he has never held office. For forty-eight long 
years he has been a resident of Kane coun- 



ty, and in that time he has done much 
towards its growth and development. On 
the 2 ist of March, 1889, he lost his resi- 
dence and household effects by fire, which 
was a very severe loss. With characteristic 
energy, he rebuilt better than ever. Mr. 
Switzer is well known in Kane county, and 
he and his estimable wife are honored and 
respected by all who know them. 



PERSONS C. GILBERT, deceased, was 
for many years one of the leading agri- 
culturists and representative citizens of El- 
gin township, Kane county, but spent his 
last years in retirement in the city of Elgin, 
where he was also numbered among the 
valued and highly respected citizens. He 
was born in Cassanovia, New York, Octo- 
ber 23, 1812, a son of Benjamin and Sarah 
(Wells) Gilbert. The father, born August 
2 9, '7 8 9. died in 1816, and the mother, 
born March 25, 1790, departed this life in 
1889, when in her one hundredth year. At 
the age of eighty-four she came from the 
east all alone to visit friends in Elgin. She 
was a cultured and refined lady of pleasing 
presence and was always very active. Our 
subject was the second in order of birth in 
the family of three children, the others be- 
ing George, a farmer, who died in New 
York state; and Mary Ann, who married 
Gardner Wescote and both are now de- 
ceased. 

Being only four years old at the time of 
his father's death, Persons C. Gilbert was 
reared by his grandparents, Theodore and 
Lydia (Albard) Gilbert, of Cassanovia, New 
York, remainingwith them until he attained 
his fifteenth year, and acquiring his educa- 
tion in the public schools. Twice he un- 



Of 



Of 




PERSONS C. GILBERT. 







MRS. P. C. GILBERT. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



233 



dertook to learn a trade, but was obliged to 
give it up owing to ill health. 

In his native state Mr. Gilbert worked at 
farm labor until twenty-three years of age, 
when, in 1835, he came to Illinois with two 
aunts Fannie, wife of Dr. Nathan Collins, 
who settled at St. Charles; and Emeline, 
wife of Dr. Joseph Tefft, who located in 
Elgin. The journey was made in two 
wagons, each drawn by three horses, one 
wagon containing Dr. Collins' family, and 
also Dr. Tefft's. They were accompanied 
by Jonathan Tefft and family in the other 
wagon. These physicians were important 
factors in the new settlement, where fever 
and ague held sway, and at an early day 
their practice extended over a wide territory. 
Dr. Tefft was the first physician to locate in 
Elgin, and for many years was its most 
prominent one. Later he was elected pres- 
ident of the Elgin Academy and served in 
that capacity until his death. He was wide- 
ly and favorably known both as a physician 
and educator, was president of the Scientific 
Society, and was the first mayor of Elgin, 
serving as such two terms. He was born 
August 29, 1812, and died in 1888, being 
buried on the seventy-sixth anniversary of 
his birth. His first wife, Mrs. Emeline 
(Gilbert) Tefft, died August 18, 1844, and 
the two children born to them are also de- 
ceased. For his second wife Dr. Tefft 
married Mrs. Lavina Ormsby, who died in 
July, 1897, whenever eighty years of age, 
and to them was born a son, Dr. L. E. 
Tefft. The mother had a daughter by her 
first marriage, Cornelia Ormsby, now Mrs. 
Strothers, of Texas. 

After coming to Kane county, Mr. Gil- 
bert took up a tract of government land and 
subsequently purchased a claim, the first 

tract being the present site of the shoe fac- 
11 



tory in Elgin. He was a very successful 
farmer, owning at one time several fine 
farms, including the old homestead, which 
originally contained two hundred and twelve 
acres, and after selling a right of way to a 
railroad company still comprised one hun- 
dred and sixty acres. He continued to re- 
side upon that place until 1843, when they 
removed to the farm of one hundred and 
seventy-six acres on the St. Charles road, 
adjoining the city limits of Elgin, where 
they resided until their removal to the city 
of Elgin in 1 869, locating on the lot where 
his widow still lives. His fellow-citizens 
recognizing his worth and ability, offered 
him the nomination of mayor of the city, 
but he refused all public positions, only 
serving as a member of the school board, as 
he always- topk a deep interest in educational 
affairs. Politically he was first a Whig and 
later a Republican. He was a man of ex- 
cellent business qualifications, was enter- 
prising and industrious, and was justly re- 
garded as one of the valued and useful citi- 
zens of his community. Wherever he went 
he commanded the respect and confidence 
of all with whom he came in contact. He 
died April 22, 1895. 

On the 30th of September, 1840, Mr. 
Gilbert was united in marriage to Miss 
Louisa Tefft, who was born in New York, a 
daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Col- 
lins) Tefft, the former a native of Rhode 
Island, the latter of Poughkeepsie, New 
York. Her paternal grandparents were 
Jeremiah and Rhoda (Hoxie) Tefft, also na- 
tives of Rhode Island, and they died in 1823 
and 1832, respectively. The maternal grand- 
parents were Solomon and Sarah (Perry) 
Collins, the latter a cousin of Commodore 
Perry. Mrs. Gilbert still lives at the old 
home in Elgin, where she is surrounded by 



234 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



many warm friends and acquaintances who 
appreciate her sterling worth and many ex- 
cellencies of character. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Gil- 
bert were as follows: (i) George P., born 
August 20, 1841, began his education in a 
private school and later became one of the 
first students in the Elgin Academy. He 
was a bright young man and was his father's 
able assistant on the farm until July, 1861, 
when he responded to President Lincoln's 
first call for three hundred thousand volun- 
teers, being one of the first of the town to 
enlist. As a member of Company A, Sev- 
enth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, he went to 
the front and assisted in the destruction of 
a railroad. While thus employed he was 
drenched by a cold rain, from the effects of 
which he took a violent cold which settled 
on his lungs, causing his death. He died 
on his way back to Cairo, Illinois, February 
4, 1862, and while on this journey his regi- 
ment took part in their first battle, that of 
Fort Henry, Tennessee. (2) Melissa, born 
August i, 1843, died August 25, 1844. (3) 
Mary G. is now the widow of A. D. Martin, 
of Elgin, by whom she had two children: 
Percy G. and Alia May. Percy married 
Leah McComb and has two children, Earl 
G. and Harry P. (4) Ada H. Baird, an 
adopted daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert, 
always found a happy home with them. 
She is now the wife of George W. Hinsdale, 
of Elgin, and has two children, Lillian and 
Ray W. 



JAMES WALKER, ex-mayor of Aurora, 
and for forty-one years foreman of the 
blacksmith department of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy railroad at Aurora, 
was born in Wilmington, Delaware, Novem- 



ber 20, 1834, and is the son of William and 
Demaris (Patchet) Walker. Early in 1841 
the family emigrated from Delaware to De- 
troit, Michigan, and while en route, at Har- 
risburg, Pennsylvania, they received the 
news of the sudden death of President Har- 
rison. Soon after their arrival in Detroit 
the father was taken down with typhoid 
fever, from which he never recovered. The 
mother long survived him, dying at the age 
of eighty-four years. They were both mem- 
bers of the Baptist church, and lived and 
died in the faith. Of their family of seven 
children our subject was second in order of 
birth, and of the number six are still liv- 
ing, and all save our subject reside in Mich- 
igan. 

James Walker was but seven years old 
when his parents settled at Detroit, Michi- 
gan. He there grew to manhood, and in 
his youth began to learn the blacksmith and 
machinist trade, which he has followed 
throughout life. After obtaining a thor- 
ough knowledge of his trade, when but 
nineteen years of age, he was chosen to 
take charge of the blacksmithing depart- 
ment of the Chicago Steam Engine Works, 
in Chicago. This responsible position he 
held until chosen to hold a position with 
what is now the Chicago & Northwestern 
Railroad Company. On the ist of June, 
1857, he accepted a position with the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Com- 
pany as foreman of their blacksmith shop 
at Aurora, with which corporation -he has 
since been connected, a term of service 
which is without a parallel in the state for 
long, efficient and satisfactory service. He 
has from sixty to one hundred men under 
his supervision. 

Mr. Walker was married in 1856 to Miss 
Jane Ann Atkinson, of Chicago, daughter of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



235 



William and Hannah Atkinson, the latter 
still residing in Chicago, at the age of eighty- 
six years, with mind as clear as ever. By 
this union there has been one child, Alice, 
now the wife of C. C. Nichols, of Aurora. 
Mrs. Walker is an active and honored mem- 
ber of the Eastern Star, and is a past grand 
matron of the state of Illinois. She is a 
lady of culture and refinement, and in every 
way worthy to fill the high position in the 
state to which she has been chosen. At 
present she is president of the board of 
trustees of the Masonic and Eastern Star 
Home of Illinois, located at Macon. Her 
daughter, Mrs. Nichols, is a co-worker with 
her in the order, while Mr. Nichols takes 
high rank with the brethren, at present hold- 
ing the position of grand lecturer of Royal 
Arch Masonry of Illinois. 

In politics Mr. Walker is a Republican 
and has been honored by the citizens of 
Aurora with the highest office in their gift, 
being unanimously elected as mayor in 
1870, and serving one term with credit to 
all concerned, While serving as mayor, 
great improvement was made in the streets 
by graveling. Fraternally he is a member 
of the Masonic order, having obtained the 
thirty-second degree. He is deeply inter- 
ested yet, as he always has been, in public 
affairs and the good of the community where 
he has so long resided. He is genial, court- 
eous, enterprising and progressive, of com- 
mendable public spirit, and the highest in- 
tegrity, and reflects credit on the commun- 
ity which has honored him in the highest 
office. His practical knowledge of all the 
details of his business, as well as his ac- 
quaintance with men, renders him a most 
valuable employee, as is evinced by his long 
continuance in so important a position in 
one of the leading railroad companies of the 



Union. When the dark cloud of war arose, 
Mr. Walker rendered a very valuable serv- 
ice in raising means for the support of the 
soldiers at the front, and their families at 
home. Mr. and Mrs. Walker are highly 
respected citizens, and are justly entitled to 
the high social position they now occupy. 



JUDGE HENRY B. WILLIS. Illinois 
has always been distinguished for the 
high rank of her bench and bar. None of 
the western states can, justly boast of abler 
jurists or attorneys. Many of them have 
been men of national fame, and among 
those whose lives have been passed on a 
quieter plane there is scarcely a town or 
village in the state but can boast of one or 
more lawyers capable of crossing swords in 
forensic combat with any of the distin- 
guished legal lights in the United States. In 
Judge Willis we find united many of the 
rare qualities which go to make up the suc- 
cessful lawyer and jurist. His home is at 
No. 503 Prospect street, Elgin, and he is 
now serving his second term as judge of the 
sixteenth judicial circuit. 

The Judge was born in Bennington, Ver- 
mont, May 8, 1849, an< ^ ' s a son f David 
W. and Laura (Haliday) Willis, also natives 
of the Green Mountain state. Four chil- 
dren were born to them, but two died in in- 
fancy. The only brother of our subject, 
Seneca Willis, is now a farmer of Sycamore, 
Illinois. The father, who was an agricult- 
uralist, came to Illinois in 1852 and located 
in Genoa, where he purchased a farm and 
reared his family. In 1877 he removed to 
Sycamore, where he died September 23, 

1896, when past the age of seventy-nine 
years, and his wife passed away in March, 

1897, aged seventy-two. She was a faith- 



236 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ful member of the Methodist church. Her 
father, Joseph Haliday, also a native of 
Vermont, and a farmer by occupation, came 
to this state in 1855 and located in Genoa, 
where he died at about the age of seventy- 
four. In his family were six children who 
reached years of maturity. 

Judge Willis was reared like most farmer 
boys upon the home farm in Genoa town- 
ship, De Kalb county, and in the district 
schools of the locality he began his educa- 
tion. Later he attended Clark Seminary 
at Aurora, Illinois, and Hillsdale College at 
Hillsdale, Michigan. In 1869 he entered 
the Albany Law School of Albany, New 
York, and after completing the prescribed 
course, he was admitted to the bar in that 
state in 1870. The following year he was 
granted a license to practice in the courts 
of Illinois, and in 1872 opened an office in 
Elgin, where he has since made his home. 

In October, 1874, Judge Willis was 
united in marriage to Miss Lucy, daughter 
of John and Betsy (Hammond) Wait, and 
they have become the parents of two chil- 
dren Oliver P. and Meribah T. The Judge 
is a prominent member of a number of civic 
societies, including Monitor lodge, No. 522, 
F. & A. M.; Loyal L. Munn chapter, No. 
96, R. A. M. ; Everet commandery, K. T. ; 
and Medinah Temple. He also belongs 
to the Modern Woodmen of America, the 
Royal Arcanum, and is one of the oldest 
members of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen in Elgin. His political support is 
given the Republican party. 

After four years of successful practice in 
Elgin, Judge Willis was elected state's attor- 
ney of Kane county, serving in that posi- 
tion from 1876 until 1880. He also filled 
the office of mayor of Elgin for one term 
and during that time was instrumental in 



securing the city water works. In June, 
1891, he was first selected judge of the cir- 
cuit court, and in June, 1897, was re-elected 
to that position which he had so capably 
and satisfactorily filled. His mind is ana- 
lytical, logical and inductive. With a thor- 
ough and comprehensive knowledge of the 
fundamental principles of law, he combines 
a familiarity with statutory law and a sober, 
clear judgment, which makes him not only 
a formidable adversary in legal combat, but 
has given him the distinction of being one 
of the ablest jurists of the state. 



HARRISON H. REAMS. The Reams 
family originally was from Alsace or 
Loraine in the valley of the Rhine. The 
earliest ancestor of whom anything definite 
is known is Henry Reams, a native of Berks 
county, Pennsylvania. His son, Benjamin, 
born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, moved 
to Union county in the same state, where 
Levi, the father of our subject was born. 
Benjamin Reams was born August 8, 1797, 
and died in June, 1847. He married Su- 
sanna Aurand, a native of Union county, 
Pennsylvania, and a descendant of General 
Aurand, who was an officer during the Revo- 
lutionary war and who came from England 
prior to that conflict. 

Levi Reams was born in Buffalo Valley, 
Union county, Pennsylvania, June 1 1, 1826, 
and with his parents moved to Ohio in 1832. 
In 1846 they carne further west to Kane 
county, Levi having preceded the family 
two years. Levi worked three years for an 
uncle, Henry Decker, then married and be- 
gan life for himself. Having learned the 
carpenter's trade, he secured remunerative 
employment, saved his money and pur- 
chased land. He bought and sold several 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



237 



tracts, each time bettering himself. During 
the war for the Union he enlisted, and after 
serving his term returned and purchased 
one hundred acres of land in Hampshire 
township, near Harmony, McHenry county, 
which he cultivated ten years, sold and 
bought one hundred and twenty-four acres 
two miles from Harmony, which he owned 
until 1884, when he sold and moved to Chi- 
cago, lived there six months, then came to 
the village of Hampshire, built his present 
house and has lived there since. 

Levi Reams has a creditable record in 
the army. He enlisted February i, 1864, 
and served faithfully until July 6, 1865. 
He was sent first to Pulaski, Tennessee, 
thence to Atlanta, his first battle being at 
Dallas, which was followed by Resaca, Buz- 
zard's Roost, and ten other battles of the 
campaign around Atlanta. He was on the 
famous march to the sea. He received his 
first mail for many weeks at Cape Fear 
River. At Rossville, North Carolina, he 
first heard of Lee's surrender. With his 
regiment he later participated in the grand 
review at Washington. He returned through 
Wheeling, West Virginia, and Louisville, 
Kentucky, to Chicago, where he was finally 
discharged. Of his father's family, he and 
his brother Thomas alone survive. His eld- 
est brother, John, died in service during the 
Mexican war. His brother Samuel, who 
recently died in Hampshire, also served 
with credit through the Civil war. 

Levi Reams first married Magdalena 
Schoemaker, a native of Alsace, born in 
1827, and who came to America in 1829, 
with her father, Peter Schoemaker, who was 
by occupation a farmer. She died June 6 V 
1884. By this marriage there were nine 
children, as follows: Louise, wife of Charles 
Wiedmeyer, of Jacksonville, Illinois; George, 



who lives in Hageman, New Mexico; Israel, 
in business in the village of Hampshire; 
Lydia, who married Frank Nichols, of Chi- 
cago; Matilda, who married Ernest Wied- 
meyer, of Virginia City, Illinois; Harrison 
H., our subject; Jane, who married Will- 
iam Daum, a farmer in Hampshire town- 
ship; William, a minister of the Congrega- 
tional church, at Cumberland, Wisconsin; 
and Emma, at present making her home 
with her brother George, in New Mexico. 

Harrison H. Reams was born in Hamp- 
shire township, July 26, 1860, and attended 
the district schools until the age of twenty, 
in the meantime assisting in the cultivation 
of the home farm. At the age of twenty- 
one, in partnership with his brother, he 
bought one hundred and twenty- four acres of 
land in Hampshire township, farmed seven 
years, sold out and moved to the village of 
Hampshire, in 1888, where he began the 
livery and transfer business, in which he is 
meeting with good success. He is also en- 
gaged in feeding and dealing in thoroughbred 
horses, French Coach and Percheron. He 
married Lydia Detmer, of Kane county, and 
a daughter of A. H. Detmer. In politics 
Mr. Reams is a Republican, and for nine 
years served as highway commissioner, was 
six years a member of the village board of 
trustees, and is at present deputy sheriff of 
Kane county. Fraternally he is a member 
of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
Knights of the Maccabees, and of lodge No. 
730, I. O. O. F., at Hampshire, Illinois. 



DANIEL B. WATERMAN, of Aurora, 
Illinois, is numbered among the pio- 
neers of 1843, and in the fifty-five years of 
his residence here has been a most impor- 
tant factor in the development and improve- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ment of the place. Not alone in Aurora has 
his influence for good been felt, but through- 
out all northern Illinois. He was born in 
Rochester, Monroe county, New York, and 
traces his ancestry back to Richard Water- 
man, who emigrated from England with 
Roger Williams in the ship Lion, and who 
married his daughter, Mary Williams. They 
first settled in Boston, Massachusetts, from 
which they were driven out on account of 
their being of the Quaker faith. Resolved 
Waterman, the son of Richard and Mary 
"(Williams) Waterman, was born in Rhode 
Island, and his son, John Waterman, born 
in Rhode Island in 1730, was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary war, holding a colonel's com- 
mission. His son, Benjamin Waterman, 
was the father of Daniel Waterman, also 
a native of Rhode Island, born July 15, 

1789- 

Daniel Waterm in grew to manhood in 
Rhode Island, and engaged extensively in 
the manufacture of cotton goods, having 
three large mills. Soon after the close of 
the war of 1812 he moved with his family 
to Rochester, New York, where he estab- 
lished himself in business, and a little later 
read medicine, and engaged in practice until 
his death. He married in Rhode Island, 
Sabra Pierce, a native of Coventry, Rhode 
Island, born September 7, 1785, and a 
daughter of Wheeler Pierce, a native of 
Massachusetts, who spent the last years of 
his life in Rochester, New York, dying in 
January, 1858. His wife died many years 
previously, passingaway in 1833. To Daniel 
and Sabra Waterman six children were born, 
who grew to mature years, of whom our 
subject is the oldest. Hiram M. , next in 
order of birth, is a farmer and printer re- 
siding in Orleans county, Nebraska; Mrs. 
Dr. A. K. Smith resides in Chicago; George 



G., for many years a prominent man and 
merchant of Aurora, is now deceased; Ann 
Eliza, located in Waterloo, New York, but 
died at the residence of her sister at Bridge- 
port, Connecticut; and Sabra Caroline, now 
deceased, married D. S. Thorpe, and lo- 
cated at Bridgeoprt, Connecticut. 

Daniel B. Waterman was born April 2 1 , 
1821, and spent his boyhood and youth in 
Rochester. New York, and was educated in its 
common schools and Yates County Academy. 
In 1842, after reaching his majority, he 
came west to Indiana, and spent one sea- 
son, earning sufficient to purchase eighty 
acres of timber land, in Whiteley county. 
He returned to Rochester, and in the spring 
of 1843 came to Aurora, where he joined 
his brother, George G. Waterman, who had 
located here in 1837, and was engaged in 
the hardware trade on the east side. He 
commenced clerking for his brother, and a 
little later purchased an interest in the es- 
tablishment. In the fall of 1849, he started 
in business alone, on the west side in a very 
small way, putting in a stock of sheet iron, 
stoves, etc., to which was added hardware 
the following year. As his trade increased 
he added to his stock from year to year, 
building up a very extensive business, which 
he continued until about 1866, when he sold 
out to engage in railroading. Through his 
personal influence, there was raised about 
eight hundred thousand dollars, with which 
to build the Chicago & Iowa railroad. By 
the governor he was appointed a director to 
represent the cities and townships that had 
subscribed to the capital stock. The city 
of Aurora subscribed one hundred thousand 
dollars to the stock of the road, issuing 
bonds for the same bearing ten per cent in- 
terest, taking certified stock for the amount. 
Mr. Waterman continued to serve as a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



239 



member of the board of directors until 1877. 
In 1870 the people of Clinton, DeKalb 
county, along the line of said road, named 
the station Waterman in recognition of his 
service in the completion of the road, at 
which time, owing to the mismanagement 
of its president, it was placed in the hands 
of a receiver. Previous to this a line of 
road had been completed from Rochelle to 
Rockford, of which Mr. Waterman was 
made president, and it was later leased to 
the Chicago & Iowa railroad as a feeder to 
that road. In 1870 he was appointed by 
Governor Palmer to represent the stock 
subscribed by cities, towns and counties 
under the law existing at that time, and 
subsequently Mr. Waterman was elected by 
the directors president of the Chicago & 
Iowa railroad, in which capacity he 
continued to serve for six or seven 
years. While connected with the road, it" 
was decided by the people of Aurora to dis- 
pose of the stock it held at public sale. 
Through the influence of Mr. Waterman it 
was sold for one hundred and thirty thou- 
sand two hundred dollars. With the pro- 
ceeds of this sale, the public roads of Aurora 
were graveled, and bridges constructed over 
Fox river. Mr. Waterman has also been 
connected with other important railroad 
enterprises in Illinois and Minnesota, in- 
cluding the -Chicago & Northwestern rail- 
road. He was with the Northwestern while 
it was being built through Minnesota and 
Dakota, and for it purchased the land, se- 
cured the right of way and located the 
stations. 

Mr. Waterman was married in Aurora, 
February 17, 1852, to Miss Ann White, a 
native of Jefferson county, New York, and 
the daughter of Harry White, one of the 
first settlers of Blackberry township, where 



he opened up a farm of four hundred and 
twenty acres. By this union there was one 
daughter, Emma Sabra, who grew to ma- 
ture years and died February 4, 1875, when 
in her twenty-second year. 

Politically Mr. Waterman was originally 
a Whig.and beinga strong anti-slavery man, 
he later identified himself with the Free-soil 
party, and was a delegate to the convention 
that nominated James H. Woodruff, of Chi- 
cago, to congress, to which office he was 
elected. On the organization of the Repub- 
lican party, he became identified with it, 
and has since been a stanch advocate of its 
principles. He has served as delegate to 
various state and county conventions, as a 
Whig and Republican, and early in the 
fifties was a Whig candidate for the legisla- 
ture. For ten years he served as alderman 
and one term as mayor of the city. Fra- 
ternally he is a Mason, and member of the 
blue lodge and chapter of Aurora. As a 
citizen none stands higher in the estimation 
of his fellow-men, and no man has done 
more for the material interests of Aurora, 
than has the subject of this sketch. 



DANIEL M. McKINDLEY, who owns 
and operates a valuable and well-im- 
proved farm of two hundred and twelve 
acres, a mile and a half east of the city of 
St. Charles, and which is known as the 
Glenmona farm, dates his residence in Illi- 
nois since August, 1872, and in Kane coun- 
ty since 1 894. He was born in the city of 
Belfast, Ireland, February 2, 1850, where 
he remained until thirteen years of age. 
His father, Hugh McKindley, died in Bel- 
fast, and, being thrown on his own re- 
sources, Daniel determined to come to 
America that he might better himself in' 



240 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



life. He was a young man of seventeen 
years, and, with the buoyancy of youth, de- 
termined to succeed in life. Landing in 
New York city, he remained there about 
one year and then went to Canada, and 
there worked for a farmer for a short time, 
near Montreal. In August, 1872, he came 
west to Chicago, and run on the lakes for 
one season. He then attended the Bryant 
& Stratton Commercial College, and re- 
ceived a fair business education. For a 
few years following he worked in a grocery 
store, and then engaged in the coal busi- 
ness, which he operated with success for 
some years. In 1894 he came to Raife 
county and bought the farm where he has 
since resided. He is now regarded as one 
of the active and enterprising farmers of 
the county, and is also engaged in the dairy 
business. Since coming here he has made 
some substantial improvements on the 
farm, erecting a large barn, 54x116 feet, 
with a basement, a large carriage house 
and horse barn, put in a wind pump and 
water works, both for his residence and 
barn, and it is now one of the most valu- 
able places in the township. 

Mr. McKindley married, in the city of 
Chicago, December 29, 1886, Miss Hannah 
Carbine, a lady of fine education, and a 
graduate of the old Chicago Normal, in the 
class of '76. Later she was one of the suc- 
cessful teachers in the Chicago schools, 
where she was engaged for a period of ten 
years. She was born and reared in Chi- 
cago, and is the daughter of James Carbine, 
now deceased. She was elected a member 
of the board of directors of District No. 6, 
St. Charles township, the first lady elected 
to that position, and being a practical 
teacher, she was enabled to discharge her 
duties of the office in a most satisfactory 



manner. She later resigned. To Mr. and 
Mrs. McKindley six children have been born, 
as follows: Daniel, Hugh, Innoc, Virginia, 
Leo and Adelaide. 

Mr. and Mrs. McKindley and their fam- 
ily are members of the Catholic church of 
St. Charles. Politically he is an independent, 
voting for men, not party. Although they 
have resided here but a few years, they have 
made many friends in that time, and are 
held in high esteem because of their many 
excellent traits of character. 



WILLIAM E. MARSHALL, one of the 
substantial and wide-awake farmers 
of Plato township, residing on section 25, is 
the son of George P. and Mary (Burton) 
Marshall, the former a native of Yorkshire, 
England, born May 9, 1817, and the latter 
near Montreal, Canada, in the town of Shar- 
rington, August 14, 1825. 

The boyhood and youth of George P. 
Marshall were spent in his native land and 
he there learned the carpenter's trade, 
which occupation he followed for some 
years. In 1842 he crossed the Atlantic, lo- 
cating near Montreal, Canada, where his 
marriage occurred. In 1844 he came to 
Kane county, Illinois, and rented a farm in 
Plato township for two years, then pur- 
chased seventy-seven acres in sections 27 
and 28, where he continued to farm until 
his death, which occurred October 3, 1881. 
While residing in England he was a mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows, but did not affiliate 
with the order after coming to America. 
A man of unblemished character, he com- 
manded the highest respect of all who knew 
him. He was a man of his word and up- 
right in his dealings with his fellowmen. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 




WILLIAM E. MARSHALL. 




MRS. W. E. MARSHALL. 



0* 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



243 



James Marshall, married Ann Parker, and 
lived and died in Yorkshire, England. The 
maternal grandfather, John Burton, was 
born at North Burton, Yorkshire, England, 
a town named for one of his ancestors. He 
was a son of Richard and Mary Burton. 
While yet residing in England he married 
Jane Stringer, born in Hull, Yorkshire, 
England, in 1794, and daughter of Richard 
and Hannah (Garbutt) Stringer, both of 
Yorkshire, England. Her death occurred 
at the age of sixty-seven years. In 1818 
John Burton emigrated to Canada and was 
killed in battle during the Canadian rebel- 
lion, while in the service of the crown. 

William E. Marshall was born in Elgin 
township, December 25, 1847. He at- 
tended the district school until about eight- 
een years of age, and remained at home un- 
til thirty years old, working for and with his 
father. In 1878 he was united in marriage 
with Miss Agnes. McKinnell, daughter of 
Peter and Jessie (McDowell) McKinnell. 
She was the second in a family of seven 
children born to her parents. Her father 
was born in the parish of Kirk Kinner.Wig- 
tonshire, Scotland, June 26, 1825. He 
was the son of James McKinnell, of the 
same parish, who married Janet Hawthorn, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Cleave) 
Hawthorn. Jessie McDowell was born in 
the parish of Kirk Kinner, February 2, 
1834, and her marriage with Peter Mc- 
Kinnell occurred in that parish April 20, 
1854. In the winter of 1854-5 they came 
to America. She was the daughter of 
Charles McDowell, who married Ellen Pat- 
terson, of the same parish, and a daughter 
of James and Janet (McHarg) Patterson. 
To our subject and his wife six children 
.have been born Charles H., Jessie May, 
Lucy, Mary, Hattie and Willie. 



Soon after his marriage, Mr. Marshall 
rented eighty acres in Elgin township, for 
two years, then rented the Sargent farm 
two years, in Plato township, and the 
Roseburough farm, near Udina, one year. 
He then went to DuPage county, and lived 
upon a rented farm, near Wayne, one year, 
when he returned to Elgin township and 
rented the George Stringer farm, upon which 
he resided seven years. In 1890 he pur- 
chased his present farm of two hundred 
and thirty acres, upon which he has since 
continued to reside, and for some years has 
engaged in dairying, usually keeping about 
sixty head of cows, and shipping the product 
to Chicago. For some time he engaged in 
raising driving horses, principally the Ham- 
bletonian stock. His farm is in a good state 
of cultivation, having on it a good dwelling 
house, a large barn and various outbuild- 
ings. Fraternally Mr. Marshall is a mem- 
ber of Silver Leaf camp, No. 60, M. W. A. 
Politically he is a Republican, and has ac- 
ceptably filled several minor official positions 
in his township. He is a man well esteemed 
throughout the community and has many 
warm friends. 



f->EORGE S. CHISHOLM, of Elgin, 
\-t residing at No. 306 Spring street, was 
born in La Fayette county, Wisconsin, 
February 13, 1845, a son f Robert S. and 
Sarah (Van Vaulkenburgh) Chisholm, in 
whose family were the following named 
children: One daughter, Frances, died at 
the age of nine years. William W. is a 
resident of Salt Lake City, Utah, and is 
president of the Bank of Commerce there. 
O. P. was formerly an attorney of Elgin 
and represented this district in the Illinois 
legislature, but is now a resident of Boze- 



244 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



man, Montana. George S. is next in order 
of birth. Robert B., Jr., lives in Manhat- 
tan, Montana. Mary Emma is the wife of 
George Bennett, of Geneva, Illinois. 

The father was a man of marked busi- 
ness ability, was the discoverer of the Emma 
mine, named in honor of his daughter, and 
was eminently successful in his mining oper- 
ations, that mine alone yielding from five 
to six hundred thousand dollars, principally 
in gold and silver. It is located twenty- 
seven miles southeast of Salt Lake City, 
Utah, in the Little Cottonwood district in 
the Wausatch range of mountains. At an 
early day he became interested in lead min- 
ing at a place called Benton, twelve miles 
east of Galena, Illinois, and here also met 
with success. In 1851 with an ox team he 
crossed the plains to California and Nevada, 
where he engaged in mining with Captain 
Day, of Galena, Illinois, who died in Ga- 
lena in 1895. The original owners of the 
Emma mine were Robert B. Chisholm, 
Captain Day, Captain James Smith, of 
Chicago, and J. F. Woodman, now the 
president of the Centennial Eureka mine, 
located at Eureka, Utah, eighty miles south 
of Salt Lake City. With the exception of 
Captain Smith, the others were associated 
in the mining business from boyhood. The 
father of our subject died in Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, June 30, 1893, at the age of seven- 
ty-eight years, and his remains were brought 
back to Elgin for interment. He was a 
Knight Templar Mason, and was honored 
and respected by all who knew him. His 
wife died in 1882 aged fifty-two years. 

George S. Chisholm was reared princi- 
pally in Elgin, and in the Elgin Academy 
completed his literary education. For some 
years he successfully engaged in agricultural 
pursuits in Du Page county, Illinois, where 



he owned a fine farm of four hundred acres, 
which he sold about ten years ago. In 
connection with general farming he was also 
extensively engaged in the raising of fine 
stock, making a specialty of Norman horses, 
shorthorn and Durham cattle and Poland 
China hogs, getting his stock from Ohio; 
but in 1887 he disposed of that business and 
has since devoted his time and attention to 
his mining and real-estate interests. The 
shares of the Eureka mine, above referred 
to, are owned by Mr. Woodman, George S. 
Chisholm, his brothers, William W., O. P., 
Robert B., and their sister, Mrs. Bennett, 
William W. being the secretary and treas- 
urer of the company. The mine has now 
been in successful operation for twenty 
years, and up to April 15, 1897, had paid 
in the way of dividends two million and ten 
thousand dollars. The company is now 
testing a new process of treating ores from 
this property, which, if successful, a plant 
will be erected abundantly large enough to 
care for all the ores taken from the mine. 
Both gold and silver are here mined and 
also a certain per cent of copper. 

In 1872, Mr. Chisholm, the subject of 
this sketch, was married to Miss Angeline 
Hatch, a daughter of James C. Hatch, who 
is now ninety-four years of age, and is still 
well preserved both physically and mental- 
ly. Her mother died in 1877, at the age 
of sixty-five years. The children born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Chisholm are: Cora May, 
Marie Louise, Archie S., James Harold, 
William Wallace, Olive Edith, and George 
Edward, who are all living, except Cora 
May, who died October 15, 1878, and Olive 
Edith, who died on the ist day of August, 
1896, at the age of four years. 

Mr. Chisholm takes some interest in po- 
litical affairs, but votes rather for the man 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



245 



than for the party which he represents. 
Socially, he is a prominent Mason, belong- 
ing to Monitor lodge, No. 522, F. & A. M., 
and the consistory and Medinah Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine of Chicago. He also 
belongs to the Uniformed Rank, Knights of 
Pythias. He takes a deep interest in every- 
thing pertaining to the public welfare of his 
adopted city, and withholds his support 
from no enterprise calculated to prove of 
public benefit. His wife is a member of 
the Congregational church, also a member 
of the Elgin Woman's Club and the Elgin 
Philharmonic Society, and in the social 
circles of Elgin they occupy an enviable po- 
sition. 



HON. SILVANUS WILCOX, ex-judge 
of the twenty-seventh judicial circuit 
of Illinois, now residing on the corner of 
Bridge and West Chicago streets, Elgin, is 
one of the best-known and most distin- 
guished citizens of Kane county. He was 
born in Charleston, Montgomery county, 
New York, September 30, 1818, and is a 
son of Elijah and Sally (Shuler) Wilcox, 
both of whom were natives of New York, 
the former born in Charles, and the latter 
in the town of Florida, Montgomery county. 
Of their ten children, eight grew to manhood 
and womanhood, and five are yet living 
Silvanus, our subject; Hannah Maria, wife 
of Charles R. Collins, of Elgin; Edward 
Sanford, of Cloud Chief, Oklahoma; John 
S., of Elgin; and Captain William H., also 
of Elgin. 

Elijah Wilcox was a man of marked 
ability, and in his native state was duly 
honored by his fellowmen. For some years 
he served as county commissioner of Mont- 
gomery county, was collector of toll on the 



Erie canal, and held various town offices. 
He also served as general in the state 
militia. By occupation he was a farmer. 
In 1842 he came to Illinois, bringing his 
family with him, and located on a farm of 
three hundred acres two and a half miles 
west of Elgin. Three years later he was 
elected a member of the state senate, the 
duties of which office he discharged in a 
most satisfactory manner. The farm on 
which he settled was in an almost primitive 
condition, and he at once began its improve- 
ment. His death occurred there in 1862 at 
the age of seventy-two years. His wife sur- 
vived him some years, dying at the age of 
eighty- five. In early life she was a Pres- 
byterian, but later in life became a Univer- 
salist, accepting the faith of her husband, 
who was steadfast in that belief. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
Silvanus Wilcox, was a native of Dutchess 
county, New York, of Welsh origin. He 
was a Revolutionary soldier, and was one 
of the guard at Tarrytown when Major An- 
dre was captured, and was present at the 
execution. His death occurred at Fulton- 
ville, Montgomery county, New York, when 
he was eighty-seven years old. 

The maternal grandfather, John Shuler, 
was also a native of New York, born near 
Catskill, of German parents. For years he 
served as justice of the peace and held other 
minor offices in the town of Florida, Mont- 
gomery county. He was a very able man 
and one of strong intellect. He was eighty- 
six years old at the time of his death. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 
his native county, and received his primary 
education in the common schools of the 
town in which the family resided. Later 
he attended the academy at Amsterdam, 
and in July, 1836, was appointed a cadet at 



246 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



West Point, his examination giving dim 
fifth place in a class of fifty. On account 
of failing health he resigned August 15, 
1839. His room mates were H. W. Hal- 
leek, R. Q. Butler, Stewart Van Vliet and 
Schuyler Hamilton, all of whom are dead 
except Van Vliet. In 1861, at the Planters 
House in St. Louis, he met Hamilton going 
up the stairs and accompanied him to Hal- 
leek's room. He was a great friend of 
these gentlemen, and on meeting them Hal- 
leek exclaimed "Wilcox, I thought you 
were dead." He corresponded with them 
all through the war. Besides those men- 
tioned, William T. Sherman and George H. 
Thomas, both famous generals of the Civil 
war, were his classmates. The following 
is a letter to Mr. Wilcox from the superin- 
tendent of the military academy at West 
Point: 

MILITARY ACADEMY, ) 

WEST POINT, December 4, 1839. j 
Mr. S. Wilcox: 

SIR: Your'friend, Cadet Van Vliet, has 
requested me in your behalf for such a state- 
ment of standing and merit in your studies 
and character relative to conduct, as the 
records of this institution will enable me to 
give. 

It appears that you joined the Academy 
as a cadet in July, 1836, and that, at the 
last examination at which you were present, 
the Academic staff pronounced you the 
fourth in order of merit in mathematics, the 
ninth in French, and the thirteenth in draw- 
ing; which, when compared with the rest of 
your class, then consisting of fifty members, 
secured you the fifth place in general merit. 
It also appears from the records of the In- 
stitution that you left here in bad health, 
and that, after a protracted illness of more 
than a year, you tendered your resignation, 



which was accepted by the secretary of war, 
to take effect the I5th of August, 1839. 

It gives me much pleasure to have it in 
my power to put you in possession of such 
highly favorable testimonials of your con- 
'duct and talents when a member of this In- 
stitution. 

Respectfully, your obedient servant, 

RICHARD DELAFIELD. 
Major of Engineers, Superintendent of Mili- 

itary Academy. 

For over two years after his resignation 
from West Point Mr. Wilcox was an in- 
valid, but in 1840 he came west to Elgin, 
and located some land in that vicinity. Re- 
turning to New York for a time, he acted 
as agent for his father for a line of boats 
running from New York City to Utica. 

On the 27th of August, 1840, Mr. Wil- 
cox was united in marriage with Miss Jane 
Mallory, daughter of Henry and Polly Bent 
Mallory, of Yankee Hill, town of Florida, 
Montgomery county, New York. One son 
was born to this union, Silvanus Marcus, 
who died at the age of thirty-two years. 
Mrs. Wilcox died in Elgin April 24, 1884. 
Religiously she was a Universalist, as is 
also the Judge. She was a woman of do- 
mestic tastes and habits, one who tried to 
make a happy home, and in this she suc- 
ceeded admirably. 

In May, 1844, Mr. Wilcox came with 
his family to Elgin, and here has since 
made his home. Since 1845 he has lived 
upon the site of his present home, except 
five years, when he resided upon his farm 
near Elgin. About the time he came here 
he commenced the study of law, and in 
1846 was admitted to the bar, and at once 
commenced an active practice. His success 
was assured from the very start, and it was 
not long before he secured recognition as 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



247 



one of the most active practitioners in his 
circuit. His standing among the legal fra- 
ternity was such that in 1867 he was nomi- 
nated and elected circuit judge, and served 
the full term of six years. In the spring of 
1873 he was re-elected for another term, 
but in the fall of 1874 he was compelled to 
resign on account of ill health. The im- 
partiality displayed as a judge, and the just- 
ness of his decisions, is well known and duly 
acknowledged by all his circuit. 

For some two or three years after his 
resignation from the bench, Judge Wilcox 
devoted his time principally to regaining his 
health and looking after his private business 
interests. In 1891 he platted a part of a 
farm, and for a time was engaged in the dis- 
posal of town lots, with which he combined 
other real estate business, greatly to his 
profit. In addition to his other private 
business, he was a stockholder in the Elgin 
Condensed Milk Company, and was its 
president for three years. In every enter- 
prise in which he engaged he brought to 
bear a well-trained and well-balanced mind, 
and was therefore greatly relied on by his 
business associates. 

The Judge has traveled extensively for 
business and pleasure, and has visited every 
state and territory in the United States. In 
1891 he went to the Pacific coast, and on 
this trip visited Salt Lake City, San Fran- 
cisco, Portland, Tacoma, Seattle and Yel- 
lowstone Park. His next trip was from 
Portland, Oregon, thence to Tacoma, then 
to Sitka, Alaska. His third long trip was 
to Mexico, at which time he visited nearly 
every city of any note in that country. 

Politically the Judge is a gold Demo- 
crat, from the fact that in order to have 
genuine prosperity in the country its cur- 
rency must have stability and be accepted at 



its face in any country in the civilized world. 
He has never cared lor political office, and 
has held but few. In 1844 he was appoint- 
ed and served as postmaster of Elgin until 
1849. As a citizen he is honored and es- 
teemed by all. The Judge, B. F. Law- 
rence, Walter Pease and Henry Sherman 
were instrumental in locating the Elgin 
watch factory in this city; was also identi- 
fied in locating the Elgin Packing Company. 



JOHN GUSTAVUS LINDGREN, a re- 
tired mechanic, who for thirty-five 
years was a trusted employe of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy railroad shops at 
Aurora, dates his residence in Kane county 
from 1854. He is a native of Sweden, 
born March 18, 1826, and in his native 
country grew to manhood, and received a 
common-school education. His knowledge 
of the English language was obtained after 
coming to this country. In Sweden he 
learned the trade of a carpenter and joiner, 
serving a regular apprenticeship. The 
chance for advancement in the countries of 
the old world are very limited, and the as- 
piring young man usually thinks very 
seriously of emigrating to the United 
States, where golden opportunities are 
offered to every one. Our subject had 
heard much of this country and here deter- 
mined to make his home. Accordingly in 
June, 1854, he took a sailing vessel at. Gut- 
tenberg, for Boston, and was six weeks on 
the Atlantic, making landing July 24, and 
coming direct to Chicago, and thence to 
Geneva, where friends had previously 
settled. He immediately began work at his 
trade, and soon engaged in contracting and 
building. 

On the 6th of May, 1855, Mr. Lindgren 



248 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was united in marriage with Miss Mary 
Olson, a Swedish lady, born in 1822, in the 
same neighborhood as her husband, and who 
came with him on the same vessel to the 
new world. By this union there are three 
children Charles John, married and re- 
siding in Aurora, and employed as foreman 
in the foundry of the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy railroad; Christine, wife of Ed- 
ward Lundgren, a machinist residing in 
Aurora; and F. W., married, and who is 
also a machinist in the employ of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad. 
In 1860 Mr. Lindgren began work at the 
reaper shops in Geneva, and in December 
of that year moved to Aurora, and com- 
menced work in the railroad shops, doing 
the wood work for the locomotives. He re- 
mained in the employ of the company for 
thirty-five years, a length of time which 
tested his ability, and showed the estimation 
in which he was held by the Company. 
Soon after coming to Aurora, Mr. Lindgren 
erected a neat residence and is now the 
owner of another which he rents. Both 
himself and wife are members of the 
Swedish Lutheran church. Politically he 
is a Republican, with which party he has 
been identified since becoming a naturalized 
citizen. While Swedish born, he is a 
thorough American, and has great love for 
the country of his adoption. A man of ex- 
emplary habits, and upright character, he 
has many friends in Aurora and Kane 
county. 



MAJOR J. S. VAN PATTEN is a well- 
known business man and the present 
efficient postmaster of St. Charles. He has 
been a resident of the city since 1854, a 
period of forty-four years, and in that time 



has built up a reputation and established a 
character which will be as enduring as time. 
He is a native of the grand old Empire state, 
born in Preble, Cortland county, July 23, 
1823, and is a son of Ryer and Mary 
(Spence)Van Patten, nativesofSchenectady 
county, New York, and County Down, near 
Belfast, Ireland, respectively. 

The Van Pattens are of Holland de- 
scent, the grandfather of our subject being a 
native of that country, from which he emi- 
grated at a very early day. A year or two 
prior to the opening of the present century 
he located in Schenectady county. New 
York, and was one of its pioneers. Ryer 
Van Patten, his son, and the father of our 
subject, was born in Schenectady county, in 
1789, but in 1809 removed to Cortland 
county, where he opened up a farm, mar- 
ried Mary Spencer, who was born near Bel- 
fast, County Down, Ireland, of Scotch par- 
ents, and reared his family of two sons and 
seven daughters. His death occurred there 
in 1874 at the age of eighty-five years. John 
R. Van Patten, his son, yet occupies the old 
homestead, which comprises about three 
hundred and fifty acres, but he owns adjoin- 
ing lands sufficient to make in all twelve 
hundred acres, and which is a most valua- 
ble property. 

On the home farm in Cortland county, 
New York, our subject spent his boyhood 
and youth. His education, begun in the 
common schools, was completed in Cort- 
land Academy. Like the average farmer 
boy, he did his sharein the work of cultivat- 
ing the soil, but his tastes were not in that 
direction. At the age of nineteen he com- 
menced teaching and for three winter terms 
was in charge of the same school. How- 
ever, he commenced farming on his own ac- 
count in his native county, and continued in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



249 



that line until his removal west to Kane 
county, Illinois, in 1854. 

In December, 1847, Mr. Van Patten was 
married in Cortland county, New York, to 
Louisa R. Bacon, who died six years later 
in 1853, leaving one son, Dr. Louis Van 
Patten, one of the leading physicians of St. 
Charles. The following year Mr. Van Pat- 
ten took up his residence in St. Charles, 
purchasing the drug business which was es- 
tablished in 1842 by Elisha Freeman, and 
which was then enjoying a good patronage. 
This business he yet continues, and it is one 
of the oldest establishments in the city. 

After residing in St. Charles about two 
years, Mr. Van Patten was again married, 
his second union being with Miss Jane A. 
Clark, a native of Green Oak, Michigan, 
where she was reared and educated. She 
removed with her parents to Chicago, where 
she was married December 18, 1856. By 
this union two daughters were born: Eve- 
line, now the wife of Lorenzo Van Patten, 
of Cortland county, New York; and Mabel, 
wife of Frank Rockwell, assistant postmas- 
ter of St. Charles, by whom she has three 
sons. 

The first seven years of Mr. Van Pat- 
ten's stay in St. Charles covered a very try- 
ing period in the history of the country. In 
that time occurred the financial panic of 
1857, which destroyed many valuable busi- 
ness concerns in all parts of the country, 
but which was particularly severe upon the 
west, which was flooded with worthless Ne- 
braska currency. This panic he passed 
through safely with well-established credit. 

But a mote trying period was close at 
hand. The war cloud which commenced 
forming about this time continued to grow 
in size, and notwithstanding the heroic 
efforts of the lamented Stephen A. Douglas 



and others to prevent the calamity, it broke 
upon the country in 1861, upon the inaugu- 
ration of President Lincoln. The southern 
states, restive for some years, committed 
the overt act, firing upon Fort Sumter in 
April of that year. A call was immediately 
made by the president for troops to put 
down the rebellion. The first call was fol- 
lowed by others until soon the armies 
ranged upon either side were greater than 
those in any modern war. 

Through the stirring scenes of those 
first days of the war our subject was not an 
unconcerned witness. As soon as possible 
he offered his services to his country and 
was commissioned quartermaster of the 
first battalion of the Eighth Illinois Volun- 
teer Cavalry, with rank of first lieutenant. 
In "February, 1862, he was promoted regi- 
mental quartermaster and served in that 
capacity until November, 1862, when he 
resigned. He was at once, however, com- 
missioned first lieutenant of Company M, 
and was detailed April, 1863, as acting com- 
missary of subsistence of the cavalry divis- 
ion, Army of the Potomac, Major-General 
A. Pleasanton commanding, when he re- 
turned home. 

Nine months later, Mr. Van Patten again 
re-enlisted in the Eighth Cavalry, and in 
February, 1864, was appointed quarter- 
master in the Eighth Illinois Cavalry. In 
May, 1864, he was commissioned captain 
and assistant quartermaster United States 
Volunteers, and was assigned to Vicksburg, 
where he remained as post quartermaster 
until November 3, 1865, when he resigned 
and again returned home in March, 1866, 
when he was breveted major by President 
Johnson, and as such was mustered out of 
service. 

On his return to St. Charles, Major Van 



250 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Patten again resumed the drug business, 
and in 1872 was elected cashier of the Kane 
County National Bank and served in that 
capacity for six years. During all the time, 
either in the military service or in the bank, 
he retained his interest in the drug store, 
and when released from the latter duties 
again took his place in the store. He has 
always enjoyed a good trade. 

Politically Major Van Patten has always 
been a Democrat, having an abiding faith 
in the principles of that party as best calcu- 
lated to subserve the best interests of the 
people. In 1894 he was commissioned 
postmaster of St. Charles, and yet fills that 
position acceptably to the people. In the 
great campaign of 1896 he espoused the 
gold wing side of his party. Fraternally 
he is a Master Mason. As a citizen he is 
greatly esteemed and his friends are numer- 
ous throughout the entire county. 



PHILIP FREILER, the leading whole- 
sale liquor dealer of Elgin, was born in 
Hartford, Connecticut, April 3, 1860, his 
parents being Joseph and Mary (Bachrach) 
Freiler. His father was a native of Austria, 
born near Prague in 1833. He came to the 
United States about 1850, locating in Hart- 
ford, where he engaged in the wholesale 
meat business. About 1863 he removed to 
New York city, where he conducted a hotel 
until 1867, when he went to Chicago. He 
engaged in the wholesale liquor business in 
that city until 1878, when he removed to 
Elgin, carying on business along the same 
line and at the same time retaining his busi- 
ness interests in Chicago. In 1883, owing 
to failing health, he sold out to his son 
Philip and went abroad, remaining in 
Europe for about six months, after which 



he returned to this country. He died on 
the 6th of August, 1884. He was a man 
five feet, eight inches in height, solidly 
built, and of genial temperament. In his 
political views he was a Democrat. His 
wife was a daughter of Jacob Bachrach, who 
was born near Frankfort-on-the-Rhine. 
Crossing the Atlantic, he located at Hart- 
lord in 1860, having a daughter living in 
that city. Later he took up his residence 
in Chicago, where he died in 1884, at the 
age of ninety-seven years. 

Joseph and Mary Freiler had a family of 
seven children, namely: Emma, wife of 
Adolph Stein, of Chicago; Philip; Frances, 
wife of Lewis Kuhn, now deceased; Moses 
J., a resident of Chicago; Benjamin, de- 
ceased; and Julia, wife of Bernard Stein; 
and Harriet, wife of Nathan Herzog, of 
Chicago. The mother is still living and 
makes her home with her daughter Frances. 

Philip Freiler spent the first five years 
of his life at Hartford and afterward at- 
tended school during a three-years residence 
in New York. He then removed with his 
parents to Chicago, where he continued his 
studies in the German high school, later 
pursuing a course in the Dryenfurth Educa- 
tional and Business College. He entered 
upon his business career in connection with 
his father and his brother-in-law, Adolph 
Stein, who were at that time in partnership. 
Later Mr. Stein purchased his partner's in- 
terest and our subject continued with his 
brother-in-law until 1883, when he came to 
Elgin. Here he began business on his own 
account as a wholesale liquor dealer on 
River street, near his present location and 
from the beginning he prospered in his 
undertakings, his trade constantly extending 
until it covers the territory embraced within 
the Dakotas, Nebraska, Minnesota, Wis- 




PHILIP FREILER. 



***** 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



253 



consin, Iowa, Indiana and Missouri. He 
has the largest jobbing trade of any dealer 
in the west outside of Chicago, and his ex- 
tensive patronage has brought to him a 
handsome competence. As his financial re- 
sources have increased he has made judi- 
cious investments in real estate and is also 
a stockholder in banking institutions and in 
city railway lines. 

Mr. Freiler was married July 8, 1883, 
in Elgin, to Miss Lizzie Ehrlich, daughter 
of Joseph and Kate (Smith) Ehrlich, the 
former a native of Austria and the latter of 
Frankfort, Germany. Mr. Ehrlich is now 
deceased, but the mother is still living. 
Mrs. Freiler is a native of New York city, 
and by her marriage she has become the 
mother of four children; Florence, who is 
attending school: Helen, deceased; Hilda, 
who is also in school; and Ruth. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Freiler is 
a Democrat. He held the office of treasurer 
of the Insane Hospital for four years under 
Governor Altgeld, but has never been a poli- 
tician in the sense of office seeking, prefer- 
ring to devote his energies to his business 
interests, in which he has met with signal 
success. He is a prominent Mason, holding 
membership in the blue lodge of Chicago, 
the chapter of Elgin, and the consistory 
and mystic shrine of Chicago. He is also 
connected through membership with the 
Knights of Pythias, Korassin, Foresters, 
Red Men and the Free Sons of Israel of 
Chicago. He is a man of sound judgment 
in business affairs, reliable and trustworthy, 
and is very popular with all who know him. 



/->APTAIN A. C. GRAVES, a veteran of 
\~J the war of the Union, and a pioneer of 
the state of 1834, but now living a retired 



18 



life in the city of Aurora, is well known 
throughout Kane, Du Page and adjoining 
counties. He was born in Cortland county, 
New York, February 15, 1825, and is the 
son of Phineas and Anna (Kendall) Graves, 
the former a native of Cortland county, New 
York, and the latter of Vermont. Phineas 
Graves grew to manhood in his native state, 
where his marriage with Ann Kendall oc- 
curred. By occupation he was a farmer, 
and with that laudable desire to better him- 
self he determined to come west. Accord- 
ingly on the loth of February, 1834, with 
his family, accompanied by his brothers, 
Amos and Jesse, he left his old home and 
drove through with teams, being thirty-one 
days on the road. He first located in Will 
county, three miles from the present village 
of Lockport, where he bought a claim, on 
which was a log house, and which had eight 
or ten acres broken. This was known as 
canal land. Three years later he sold out 
and moved to Du Page county, located mear 
Warrensville, taking up a claim of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, which he improved and 
made one of the finest farms in the county. 
He later sold that farm and purchased 
another in the same township, where he re- 
resided a number of years and reared his 
family. He subsequently sold the farm, 
and moved to Aurora, where he died De- 
cember 24, 1889, in his ninetieth year. His 
wife passed away February 8, 1887, and 
they were laid to rest side by side in the 
west side cemetery, where a substantial 
monument marks their last resting place. 

Captain Graves is the oldest son and 
second in order of birth of the family of 
eleven children born to Phineas and Anna 
Graves. The others are Lucy Ann, wife 
of Samuel Bartholomew, who resides near 
Turner Junction, Du Page county; Capt. 



254 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



A. C. ; Mary, widow of Lucius Bartholo- 
mew, residing in Batavia, Illinois; Juliet, 
widow of Richard S. Reynolds, residing in 
Iowa; Betsy, widow of Orlando Stolp, re- 
siding in Missouri; Ellen S., wife of James 
Vallett, of Naperville; Martha, now de- 
ceased, was the wife of Norman T. Gaz- 
ette, of Chicago; Emma, wife of Samuel 
Wright, of Denver, Colorado; Addison B., 
of Lament, Will county, Illinois; James D., 
of Chicago; and A. Judson, of Calhoun 
county, Iowa. 

The subject of this sketch came to Illi- 
nois with his parents, a lad of nine years, 
and was twelve years old when the family 
moved to Du Page county. He there as- 
sisted his father in opening up, and carrying 
on the home farm. His educational advan- 
tages were very limited, and were confined 
to the country district schools. After arriv- 
ing at mature years, he settled on a farm of 
sixty acres adjoining that of his father, 
which he operated for some years, then sold 
out and moved to Naperville. 

Mr. Graves was married in Du Page coun- 
ty, December 3, 1847, to Mary A. Buck, a 
native of Erie county, New York, and a 
daughter of Stephen Buck, who was one of 
the pioneers of Du Page county. She was 
reared and educated in her native state, and 
previous to her marriage was a teacher in 
the public schools of Du Page county. By 
this union are four daughters: Julia E. , 
wife of Judge Gary, of Wheaton, Illinois; 
Anna P., wife of William Judd, of Aurora; 
Eva Viola, wife of Oscar Hamilton, of Au- 
rora; and Bertha, wife of Lemuel Northam, 
of Joliet, Illinois. 

In 1862, Mr. Graves raised a company, 
and was commissioned captain of Company 
D, One Hundred and Fifth Regiment, Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry, and with his regi- 



ment went immediately to the front. He 
served on detached duty, and was in charge 
of a company of mounted scouts, having 
under him when he first started about 
seventy-three men when considered neces- 
sary. After serving through the winter of 
1862-3, he was compelled to abandon act- 
ive duty on account of ill health, having 
been taken down with typhoid fever. After 
he had somewhat recovered, he was placed 
on duty in the spring of 1863, on the staff 
of General Granger at Nashville. Pre- 
vious to his being assigned to the staff of 
General Granger he had been home on sick 
furlough, and returned to the front, ac- 
companying Col. Hammond, of the One 
Hundredth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with 
a large body of recruits. Joining his own 
command, he was in various engagements, 
including Dalton, Burnt Hickory, Kene- 
saw Mountain, New Hope Church, Big 
Shanty, Peach Tree Creek, and a number 
of lesser fights and engagements. After the 
Atlanta campaign, he was ordered back to 
Lookout Mountain, and reporting to the 
medical board, was sent to the hospital. 
Feeling that he could no longer remain in 
the service on account of his health, his res- 
ignation was accepted, March 8, 1865. 

Returning home, he again commenced 
farming, at which he continued two years, 
when he moved to Aurora, and has since 
been a resident of this city. He lately sold 
his original farm but still has other farms 
and some Iowa land. He has always been 
quite active in political affairs, and since the 
organization of the party has been quite 
active in political affairs, and since the or- 
ganization of the party, has been a stanch 
Republican. While yet residing in Du Page 
county, he was honored by his fellow citi- 
zens, with various official positions. For 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



255 



three years he served as collector of his 
township, and in 1855, was elected sheriff 
of the county, and moved to Napersville. 
After filling out his official term, he engaged 
in merchandising in Naperville and served 
as deputy sheriff two years. He was then 
re-elected sheriff and served another term. 
He also served his township as a member 
of the board of supervisors several terms; 
since coming to Aurora he served as city 
marshal four terms in succession. In what 
ever position held, he discharged its duties 
faithfully and well. 

Captain Graves and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Aurora Baptist church. For 
some years he was a member of the Masonic 
lodge at Naperville, but is now a dimitted 
member. For sixty-four years he has been 
a resident of the Prairie state. On his ar- 
rival here, Chicago was an insignifigant vil- 
lage, which he has lived to see become the 
second city in the union. Northern Illinois 
was then a vast wilderness, while to-day it is 
acknowledged to be the garden spot of the 
Northwest. In its transformation Captain 
Graves has borne no inconsiderable part. 



A BRAHAM P. SHERWOOD, who for 
r\ many years was actively identified with 
the agricultural interests of Kane county, 
but- is now living retired at No. 226 Hamil- 
ton avenue, Elgin, was born in the town of 
Sweden, Erie county, New York, July 5, 
1827. His father, John Sherwood, was a 
native of the same state, born April 6, 1790, 
and was a son of Hezekiah Sherwood. In 
1836 John Sherwood, who was a carpenter 
by trade left New York and removed to 
Canada, but ten years later came to Kane 
county, Illinois, making the journey by boat 
from Chatham, Canada, to Detroit, and 



thence overland to Chicago and Kane coun- 
ty, being twenty-two days en route. On 
his arrival his cash capital consisted of 
about ten dollars, but he rented a farm in 
Plato and Campton townships, and began 
life in earnest on the western frontier. A 
year later he purchased eighty acres of land 
on section 19, Plato township, and to the 
cultivation and improvement of his place 
he devoted his energies until called to his 
final rest on the 2oth of May, 1879. He 
was a soldier of the war of 1812, and at 
the battle of King's Mountains was taken 
prisoner, but was soon paroled and sent 
home. In early life he was a Democrat, 
but being a strong Union man he joined the 
Republican party about the time of its or- 
ganization, and continued one of its stanch 
supporters. In religious belief he was a 
Methodist. 

John Sherwood was twice married, his 
first union being with Sybil Jeffords, by 
whom he had three children. For his sec- 
ond wife he married Sarah Pease, a daugh- 
ter of Abraham and Sarah (Dunham) Pease, 
and to them were born six children, namely: 
Seth, who was for many years a partner of 
our subject in business; Abraham P., of this 
sketch; Melton, a resident of California; 
Martha, wife of Charles Harvey, of the 
same state; John, a resident of Nebraska; 
and Mary, deceased. 

Mr. Sherwood, of this review, began his 
education in the public schools of New York, 
later attended the subscription schools of 
Canada, but as his father was in rather lim- 
ited circumstances his school privileges were 
meager, and he is almost wholly self-edu- 
cated. At the age of nineteen years he ac- 
companied the family on their emigration 
to Kane county, and he and his oldest 
brother assisted the father in paying for his 



256 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



eighty-acre farm. Later the sons embarked 
in business on their own account, at first 
renting a tract of one hundred and sixty 
acres, which they successfully operated. 
Meeting with success in this undertaking, 
they purchased land, and being thrifty, 
energetic and of good business ability, they 
were soon able to add to their original pur- 
chase, increasing the boundaries of their 
land from time to time until they had nearly 
two thousand acres at the time of the divis- 
ion of the property. Their success was 
marvelous when compared with the careers 
of others who began life with them under 
far more advantageous conditions. Besides 
general farming, Abraham P. Sherwood was 
interested in dairying, and also in buying, 
feeding and shipping cattle. He continued 
to engage in active business until 1891, 
when, having secured a comfortable com- 
petence, he laid aside business cares, leas- 
ing some of his land, while other tracts he 
gave to his sons. Since then he has lived 
retired at his pleasant home at No. 226 
Hamilton avenue, Elgin. 

On November 11, 1852, Mr. Sherwood 
was married in Plato township, to Miss 
Phoebe Ann Wright, a native of New York 
state, and a daughter of E. Baldwin and 
Eliza (Foster) Wright. Her father, who 
was a soldier of the war of 1812, was a son 
of Solomon and Zelpha Wright. Her ma- 
ternal grandparents were James and Phoebe 
Foster. To Mr. and Mrs. Sherwood were 
born six children, as follows: George W. 
married Lillie Warner and is engaged in 
farming on section 30, Plato township; John 
B. , who is also engaged in farming on the 
same section, married Jennie McKellar and 
has two children John Leroy and Harry; 
Margaret is the wife of A. M. Chapman, of 
Elgin; Lewis H. married Etta Haygreen 



and lives in Elgin; Benjamin A., a farmer 
on section 25, Burlington township, married 
Etta Cripps and has two children Dewitt 
and Gracie; and Elizabeth Ann died at the 
age of two years. 

Although an ardent Republican in pol- 
itics, Mr. Sherwood has always refused to 
accept office of any kind, preferring to give 
his entire time and attention to his exten- 
sive business interests. His life record is 
one well worthy of emulation and contains 
many valuable lessons of incentive, showing 
the possibilities that are open to young 
men who wish to improve every opportu- 
nity for advancement. Upright and hon- 
orable in all the relations of life, he merits 
and receives the respect and confidence of 
all with whom he comes in contact. Mrs. 
Sherwood is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



ERASTUS W. BLACKMAN. Canada 
has furnished to the United States 
many bright, enterprising young men who 
have left the Dominion to enter the business 
circles of this country with its more pro- 
gressive methods, livelier competition and 
advancement more quickly secured. Among 
this number is Mr. Blackman, who was for 
many years successfully engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits in Kane county, but is now 
living retired at No. 610 West Chicago 
street, Elgin. 

He was born in Toronto, Canada, June 
1 8, 1825, a son of Zenas and Elvira (Mitch- 
ell) Blackman, the former a native of Ver- 
mont, the latter of Canada. In early life 
the father emigrated to Lower Canada, and 
from there to Upper Canada, where he 
opened up a farm. He was born in 1795, 
and, although quite young, he participated 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



257 



in the latter part of the war of 1812, receiv- 
ing for his service a land warrant, which he 
traded for land in Canada without seeing 
the tract. In 1848 he came to Kane coun- 
ty, Illinois, and first located at St. Charles, 
but removed to Wheeling, Cook county, in 
1868. He died in 1878, and his wife in 
1896, at the age of eighty-one years. Both 
were devout members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and took an active part in 
its work. 

Our subject is the oldest of their ten 
children, of whom eight are still living. 
Three of the sons were soldiers of the Civil 
war. At President Lincoln's first call for 
two hundred thousand volunteers, Ephraim 
enlisted in Dodson's Cavalry and served 
three years in the Western army, during 
which time he was never wounded or taken 
prisoner. He is married and resides in 
Arkansas. George enlisted in the One 
Hundred and Twenty-seventh Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry, which was also assigned to 
the Western army, and he -participated in 
many important battles. His arduous serv- 
ice broke down his health, and he died at 
his home in Kansas, leaving a widow and 
one child. As soon as old enough Emer- 
son A. enlisted in the ajtillery service as a 
private, and with the Army of the Potomac 
took part in some hotly contested engage- 
ments, including the battle of Gettysburg, 
where he was the last one to leave a gun 
which was captured by the Rebels. He was 
never wounded. Our subject's sisters are 
Matilda, wife of William Comfort, a farmer 
of Independence, Iowa; Eliza J., widow of 
Lucian Scott, of Elburn, Kane county; Ada- 
line, deceased wife of Walter Sutherland, a 
farmer of Kansas; Adalaide, wife of Nelson 
Sales, of Nebraska; and Laura, wife of 
Herbert Johnson, a farmer of Kansas. 



In the schools of Canada Erastus W. 
Blackman obtained his education. Through- 
out his business career he successfully en- 
gaged in farming, and on coming from 
Canada to Illinois, in 1848, he purchased 
one hundred acres of land in Wheeling 
township, Cook county, twenty-two miles 
northwest of Chicago, between Arlington 
Heights and Palatine. Subsequently he 
traded that place for two hundred acres in 
Kane county, five miles 'northwest of St. 
Charles, to the cultivation and improvement 
of which he devoted his time and attention 
for twenty years. On selling out to his son, 
he bought his present comfortable home in 
Elgin, where he now enjoys a well-earned 
rest. 

Mr. Blackman was married May 2, 1852, 
to Miss Sarah Jane Switzer, a daughter of 
Joseph and Salina Switzer, natives of Can- 
ada, where Mrs. Blackman was also born. 
Her mother died in that country at the age 
of forty-three years, and the father after- 
ward married Catherine Robinson, by whom 
he had one daughter, Amelia, who is now 
the wife of Jacob Miller, of St. Paul, Min- 
nesota, by whom she had seven children. 
He came with his family to Illinois in 1849. 
Both the mother and daughter are still liv- 
ing but Mr. Switzer died in 1855, aged 
fifty-three years. By his first marriage he 
had ten children, eight of whom still sur- 
vive, namely: Samuel; Martin; Charles; 
Mrs. Blackman; Lizzie, who married 
Stephen Gates and died about 1857, at the 
age of twenty-two years; Mary A., wife of 
I. C. Towner, of Elgin; Joseph Russell, a 
resident of St. Charles, Kane county; Will- 
iam Henry, of California; Jabez, a farmer 
of Kane county; Emma, who died in in- 
fancy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blackman have seven chil- 



2 5 8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



dren: Salina is the wife of L. A. Hovey, a 
railroad man residing in Elgin, and they 
have three children Lucia, Julia and Vine; 
Frank M., who has been a policeman in 
Aurora for many years, wedded Mary Fish 
and has two children Claud M. and May; 
Emma M. is the wife of Bela Ward, a 
farmer of Campton township, Kane county, 
and has two children Pearl and Ruby; 
Mary E. is the wife of Charles Searles, of 
Freeport, Illinois, and has three children 
Earl, Paul and Charles Raphael; Ray Allen, 
of St. Charles, married Ella Shaw and has 
one child, Myrl; Amelia is the wife of 
Arthur Bullock, who is employed in the 
watch factory at Elgin; and Philo M. is a 
machinist, residing with his parents. 

In the Methodist Episcopal church, Mr. 
and Mrs. Blackman and several of their 
children hold membership, while he has 
served as steward and filled other offices in 
the same. For thirty-eight years he has 
been a teacher in the Sunday-school, and 
for many years was superintendent, always 
taking an active and prominent part in all 
church work. He is a grand, good man, 
upright and honorable in all his dealings, 
and commands the confidence and respect 
of all with whom he comes in contact. For 
many years he served as school director in 
his township. 



HERMAN F. DEMMER, chief of police 
of Aurora, was born in Germany, and 
with his parents started for America, when 
about two months of age. Soon after their 
arrival, the mother died in St. Louis, with 
cholera during the great epidemic of that 
disease in that city. The father died about 
one year later in Buffalo, Iowa. In their 
fa/nily were four children, Herman F., our 



subject; Lena, now the wife of B. F. 
Stevens, of Orion, Henry county, Illinois; 
Anna, widow of Andrew Bolden, now resid- 
ing in Chicago; and Ida, wife of George E. 
Hampson, a retired farmer of Millford, 
Illinois. 

After the father's death, Herman was 
bound out to a Mr. Dodge, in Buffalo, 
Iowa, with whom he remained a number of 
years. He was educated in Moline, Illinois, 
where he resided after leaving Iowa. In 
1 86 1 he came to Aurora, which has since 
been his home with the exception of about 
six years. During the late war he enlisted 
and served about five months and on his re- 
turn went to railroading for the Chicago, 
.Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company, 
until 1868, when he left the service of that 
company and was engaged with the Hanni- 
bal & St. Joseph Railroad Company. At 
Davenport, Iowa, January 5, 1870, he en- 
listed in the regular army, and was sent to 
Fort Leavenworth, where he remained a 
month. He was then sent west and served 
on the plains for two and a half years. He 
was then sent to Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, 
thence to Little Rock, Arkansas, from 
which place he was again sent west to en- 
gaged in the Modoc war, but order counter- 
manded before they got to Council Bluffs. 
He was next stationed at Fort D. A. Rus- 
sell, and later at Fort Laramie. He was 
discharged at the latter place, having served 
five years, lacking five days. His record 
was an excellent one. 

Returning to Aurora, Mr. Demmer again 
began railroading, first as brakeman, and 
then conductor. After about four years 
spent in that service, he again left the 
road, and for a time engaged in business. 
He was then appointed on the police serv- 
ice, and served as patrolman two years, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



259 



when he received the appointment of chief 
of police, which position he yet holds, 
making eleven years continuous service, 
which is the longest continuous service 
of any chief ever having been employed in 
this city. At present he is president of the 
Chief of Police Union of the state of Illinois, 
which position he has held for five years. 
This is certainly an acknowledgment of his 
ability, by the chiefs throughout the state. 

On the I5th of January, 1881, Mr. 
Demmer was united in marriage with Miss 
Alma Steele, of Aurora, and a daughter of 
Catherine Steele, who is the mother of 
four children Dyer, a railway brakeman, 
residing in Aurora; Mary A., who married 
S. M. Farwell, and died in Aurora, at the 
age of forty-four years; Nelson, deceased; 
and Alma. To Mr. and Mrs. Demmer 
seven children have been born, five of whom 
are living Daisy, Mabel, Nellie, Anna, and 
Lily. Those deceased are Frank and 
George. 

In politics Mr. Demmer is an ardent Re- 
publican, who takes pleasure in upholding 
the platform and measures of his party on 
all occasions. He is one of the reliable 
men of Aurora, and his many admirable 
qualities have tended to make him popular 
with all classes with whom he comes in con- 
tact. As a public officer he has given the 
fullest satisfaction through his constituency. 
Socially he is a courteous gentleman, and is 
a man whom misfortunes have not disheart- 
ened, nor has disaster had an appalling 
effect. He was nominated by the Repub- 
lican party for sheriff in 1898. 



MANLEY P. TREADWELL, residing 
on section 10, Elgin township, was 
born on the farm where he now resides. 



His father, William Treadwell, was born 
July 22, 1823, in Almyr, Ontario, Canada, 
and came west in 1840, and later purchased 
a farm on section 10, Elgin township, where 
he resided for many years. He was the 
son of Anson and Nancy (Sorners) Tread- 
well, natives of Canada and New York, re- 
spectively. Martha A. Adams was the 
daughter of Edward and Abigail (Padel- 
ford) Adams. To William M. and Martha 
A. Treadwell three children were born, as 
follows: William E. , a physician and sur- 
geon at Maple Park; one who died in in- 
fancy; and Manley P., our subject. 

The boyhood and youth of Manley P. 
Treadwell were spent upon the home farm, 
and his education was obtained in the dis- 
trict schools and Elgin Academy. At the 
age of eighteen years he went to Chicago, 
and was there engaged in the milk business 
one year. He then returned and farmed 
with his father one year, after which he 
moved to Elgin, and for one year was en- 
gaged in teaming, and in the watch factory 
for seven years. In 1886 he again returned 
to the farm, which consists of one hundred 
and sixty acres of fine arable land, and 
where he has since continued to reside. He 
usually keeps about fifty head of cows, the 
milk from which he sells to the condensing 
factory at Elgin, and ships to Chicago. 

On the 1 6th of February, 1882, Mr. 
Treadwell was married in St. Charles, Illi- 
nois, to Miss Kate Vanderwalker, born in 
Chester, Warren county, New York, and 
eighth in a family of nine children born to 
William and Sophia (Churchill) Vander- 
walker, the latter a daughter of Otis 
Churchill. Her father did good service in 
the war of 1812. By this union one child 
has been born Alice M., who yet resides 
under the parental roof. 



260 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mr. Treadwell in politics is thoroughly 
independent, voting for such men as he 
thinks best qualified for the office. For 
many years he served as clerk of the board 
of school directors of his district and was 
annually re-elected, until he refused longer 
to serve. He is a member of the Baptist 
church, of which body his wife is also a 
member, .and was one of the main pro- 
moters of the chapel built near his residence 
in 1896. Fraternally he is a member of 
Monitor lodge, No. 522, A. F. & A. M., 
and of Silver Leaf camp, No. 60, M. W. A. 

For some years the family has been ac- 
customed to taking long trips overland, for 
health and pleasure. A number. gf seasons 
they drove through to St. Paul and back, 
returning on the west side of the rivsr-^.and 
camping by the way. They have also trav- 
eled east, visiting many of the large cities 
of New England and the central states. As 
as farmer, Mr. Treadwell ranks among the 
best, his farm being well supplied with sub- 
stantial buildings, and it is well watered by 
a large stream which flows through it. The 
farm lies very near the corporate limits of 
Elgin. 



EORGE W. L. BROWN, a well-known 
real-estate dealer of Elgin, living at 
158 North Liberty street, is proud to claim 
Illinois as his native, state, his birth having 
occurred in Cook county, April 19, 1848. He 
is a representative of one of its old and highly 
respected pioneer families, his parents being 
Schnyler and Mary Ann (Youngs) Brown, 
the former a native of New York and the 
latter of Canada. Of their seven children, 
only two are now living Charles and George 
W. L. The father, a farmer by occupation, 
came to Illinois as early as 1833, with a Mr. 



Scuttler and located at old Fort Dearborn, 
now Chicago. He carried on farming seven 
miles west of Blue Island, in Cook county, 
and there reared his family, but in 1856 he 
removed to Humbolt county, Iowa, where 
he engaged in his chosen calling until 1887, 
when he returned to Genoa, Illinois, to live 
with our subject. His wife, who was a 
consistent member of the Methodist church, 
had died in 1869, at the age of fifty years, and 
his death occurred in Genoa, in 1892, when 
in his eighty-eighth year. During his early 
manhood he was a member of the New York 
State Militia, and originally he was a Dem- 
ocrat in politics, but, after voting for Lin- 
coln in 1860, he continued to support the 
Republican party. Wherever known he 
was held in high regard, having the respect 
and confidence of all with whom he came in 
contact. 

Hugh Brown, our subject's paternal 
grandfather, was born in New York state, 
of English ancestry, and throughout life 
principally engaged in farming. He reared 
a family of eleven children, was a soldier in 
the war of 1812, and was over seventy years 
of age at the time of his death. The ma- 
ternal grandfather, Jerry Youngs, was a na- 
tive of Canada and died at an advanced age. 

Upon his father's farm, Mr. Brown, of 
this review, spent the days of his boyhood 
and youth, and in the district schools of 
Cook county he acquired his education. At 
the early age of fifteen, however, he laid 
aside his text books to aid his country in 
the struggle to preserve the Union, enlisting 
in Company G, Thirty-ninth Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, " Yates' Phalanx." He served 
a little less than two years and during that 
time participated in the battle of the Wil- 
derness, the siege of Washington, the bat- 
tles of Hatchie's Run, Petersburg and many 




G. W. L. BROWN. 




MRS. G. W. L. BROWN. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



265 



skirmishes. He had entered the service as 
a private, but was promoted corporal on the 
day he was shot, but did not hear the order 
of promotion. It was on the 2nd of April, 
1865, at the battle of Petersburg, that he 
was wounded, and, being sent to the hos- 
pital at Fortress Monroe, he remained there 
from the 4th of that month until July 19, 
when he was honorably discharged and re- 
turned to his home in Cook county. 

Soon after the war Mr. Brown removed 
to De Kalb county, Illinois, where he made 
his home for three years, and then went to 
Humbolt county, Iowa, engaging in farming 
there until his return to De Kalb county, in 
1872. On the ist of March, 1893, he came 
to Elgin and has since successfully engaged 
in the real estate business in this city. Be- 
ing an honorable, upright business man, he 
has met with a well deserved success in his 
undertakings, and is to-day numbered among 
the leading and valued citizens of the place. 

On the I4thof October, 1869, Mr. Brown 
married Miss Margaret J. Vote, a daughter 
of John and Anna Maria (Karn) Vote. The 
children born to them areas follows: Charles 
Elmer, who died in infancy; Clara Belle, 
who is now the wife of G. H. Brown, of 
Genoa, Illinois, and has three children, 
Hazel May, Clayton George and Floyd Har- 
vey; Maggie May, who is the wife of J. B. 
Brown, a brother of George H. , and has 
one child, Raymond Claire; George W. L. , 
Jr., a graduate of Callow's Business College; 
and Charles F. and Alta Adell, both at 
home. 

Socially, Mr. Brown is a member of the 
Masonic order, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and -Genoa post, G. A. R. ; while 
politically he has always been an uncom- 
promising Republican, doing all in his power 
to advance the interests and insure the suc- 



cess of his party. For about thirteen years 
he served as school director in New Leb- 
anon, Illinois, and was commissioner of 
highways for the same length of time. He 
is a man of recognized ability and, with his 
amiable wife, stands high in the communi- 
ties where they have made their home. 
Those who know them best are numbered 
among their warmest friends, and no citi- 
zens in Kane county are more honored or 
highly respected. 



AUGtJS"P JAPP, a retired farmer living 
in the village of Hampshire, is a rep- 
resentative of the German-American citi- 
zens, who by their industry and thrift, have 
done much in making Kane county occupy 
its proud position among the counties of 
the great state of Illinois. He was born in 
the village of Hanshagen, province of Meck- 
lenberg Schwerin, Germany, October 5, 
1847, and is the son of August Japp, Sr. , 
and Dorothy (Bottcher) Japp, the former a 
native of Jesse, Mecklenberg Schwerin, 
Germany, born in 1813, and is yet living at 
the advanced age of eighty-one years. His 
father was Hans Japp, a native of the same 
country. Dorothy Bottcher was a daugh- 
ter of Hans Bottcher, who lived and died in 
Germany. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
parochial schools in his native country un- 
til the age of fourteen, when he engaged in 
farm work, which he continued until his re- 
moval to America in 1865. He was then 
but eighteen years of age and left just be- 
fore he would have been called into the serv- 
ice of his country in the German army. 
The family sailed from Hamburg, October 
27, 1865, on the steamer Saxonia, and 
after being twenty-two days upon the water 



266 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



laded at New York. They came at once 
to Cook county, Illinois, and located at 
Shaumberg. For two years our subject 
worked as a day laborer at anything he 
could find to do. His father then rented a 
farm and for the four succeeding years he 
worked with him, giving him his time until 
twenty-five years of age. He then formed 
a partnership with his father, which was 
maintained for four years. 

On the 2 ist of September, 1872, Mr. 
Japp was united in marriage with Miss Wil- 
helmina Bredetneyer, who was born in the 
village of Katherinshagen, Hesse, Germany, 
in 1852, and who came with her parents to 
America in 1853. By this union eight 
children have been born, Mina, ist, de- 
ceased; Lena, who married Henry Koerner, 
of Genoa township, DeKalb county, Illinois; 
Mina, who married John Bottcher, and 
lives in Genoa township, De Kalb county; 
Louisa, deceased; August, John, William, 
and Henry at home. 

Immediately after his marriage, Mr. 
Japp moved with his young bride to Hamp- 
shire township, and a few years later bought 
one hundred and forty acres in sections 18 
and 19, and two hundred and fifty acres 
across the line in De Kalb county, making 
him a fine farm of three hundred and ninety 
acres. He there carried on mixed farming, 
giving special attention to stock and grain 
and making many improvements upon the 
place. He was a good farmer, industrious 
as the day was long, and success crowned 
his efforts in a remarkable degree, enabling 
him to rent the place and in the spring of 
1898 move to the village of Hampshire, 
where he is now living a retired life. Po- 
litically Mr.- Japp is a Republican and for 
sixteen years was school director of his dis- 
trict, and served as road commissioner for 



two terms. He is a member of the Luth- 
eran church, of which body his wife is also 
a member, and was the first to suggest the 
organization of a church of that denomina- 
tion in Hampshire township in 1876. Both 
are held in the highest esteem in Hamp- 
shire township and wherever known. 



OTIS N. SHEDD, now living a retired 
life in the city of Aurora, but who for 
years was one of the active, enterprising 
and representive business men of the city, 
is numbered among the settlers of 1856. 
He is a native of Maine, born in Oxford 
county, July 10, 1831, and is the son of Silas 
Shedd, a native of Massachusetts, born Oc- 
tober 2, 1794. His father, the grandfather 
of our subject, was also a native of Massa- 
chusetts. Otis N. Shedd is the seventh 
generation from Daniel Shedd, a native of 
England, who settled in Bramtree, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1644. 

Silas Shedd, the father of our subject, 
grew to manhood in his native state, and 
served in the war of 1812, for which he drew 
a pension until his death at the advanced 
age of ninety-one years. He married Miss 
Clarissa Noyes, a native of New England, 
born in 1800, and a daughter of Captain 
Ward Noyes, who for many years was a 
captain in the militia of his native state. 
Silas Shedd was a cooper by trade, and also 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. His wife 
preceded him to the land beyond, dying in 
1880. They were the parents of four chil- 
dren, of whom our subject was third in order 
of birth. Of the others, Calvin married 
and settled on the old homestead, where his 
death occurred; Alice N. married Robert 
Frost, and they reside in Norway, Maine; 
and Caroline, who married Benjamin Henry 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



267 



Noble, and after making their home in 
Maine for a few years, removed to Cali- 
fornia, where they now reside. 

In his native county and state, Otis N. 
Shedd spent his boyhood and youth on the 
farm, and during the winter months attended- 
the public schools, and later a private 
school taught by Samuel Cobb, a brother of 
Sylvanus Cobb, a noted educator and divine. 
Before attaining his majority he taught in 
his home district, and was quite successful. 
A young man, he removed to Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, and there engaged in a 
woolen mill, now known as the Washington 
Mill. Later he went to work in a soap fac- 
tory, where he continued three years, and 
learned the business of soap making. While 
residing in Lawrence he was married August 
28, 1853, to Miss T. F. Hawkins, a native 
of Vermont, reared and educated in Bruns- 
wick, that state, and a daughter of W. W. 
and Susannah (Wait) Hawkins, of Bruns- 
wick, Vermont. By this union are five 
children, one of whom died in infancy, and 
Otis N., who died in his sixth year. The 
living are Clara A., wife of Dr. S. S. De- 
lancy, of Williamsport, Indiana, and they 
have two children, Helen Delancy and 
Julius; Isabella F. widow of Professor 
Stein, of Aurora, by whom she had two 
children, Alma F. , and Edwin Arthur; and 
Alma E. , who married Mr. Merrill, moved 
to Tacoma, Washington, and there died 
leaving one daughter, Elizabeth. 

In 1855, Mr. Shedd moved west to Chi- 
cago, and there resided one winter. In the 
spring of 1856, in company with Mr. Beach, 
a former employer, he came to Aurora, and 
bought a farm of one hundred acres, which 
now lies within the city limits. On that 
farm he located, and began its improve- 
ment, and also started a soap factory and 



engaged in the manufacture of candles. In 
the same spring he laid out Beach & Shedd's 
addition to the city of Aurora. He later 
bought thirty-seven acres more, which he 
platted as Shedd's subdivision. In addition 
to this, he purchased another tract which 
was laid out as Shedd & Nobble's subdivi- 
sion. He also had charge of the old fair 
grounds, and with Mr. Dickinson had a por- 
tion of it surveyed and platted, and it is 
now known as Dickinson & Shedd's addition. 
Since its organization, he has been a stock 
holder in the Aurora Silver Plate Manufact- 
uring Company, and was a director in it 
for a number of years. He also owns stock 
in the building and loan association and in 
the German National Bank. 

Politically Mr. Shedd is a Republican, 
his first presidential ballot being cast for 
John C. Fremont, and from that time to 
the present, he has never faltered in the sup- 
port of the men and measures of that party. 
He has taken quite an active part in local 
politics, and has served four years as alder- 
man, three years as commissioner of high- 
ways, and as supervisor of the town two 
years and has been a delegate to various 
county and congressional conventions. He 
is a man of good business ability, and in 
whatever position he has been tested, has 
proven his true worth. 



CYRUS H. LARKIN, a farmer and 
dairyman residing on Larkin avenue, 
Elgin, Illinois, has made his home in Kane 
county for over sixty years, and his name is 
inseparably connected' with its agricultural 
and business interests. His thoroughly 
American spirit and his great energy have 
enabled him to mount from a lowly posi- 
tion to one of affluence. One of his lead- 



268 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ing characteristics in business affairs is his 
fine sense of order and complete system, 
and the habit of giving careful attention to 
details without which success in an under- 
taking is never an assured fact. 

Mr. Larkin was born in Waterville, 
Vermont, May 20, 1830, and is a son of 
Cyrus and Sarah A. (Homer) Larkin, also 
natives of that state. In their family were 
only two children, and Emily W. is now 
deceased. The father was a woolen manu- 
facturer in early life and later a farmer. 
On coming to Illinois, in 1837, he secured 
a farm in Dundee township, Kane county, 
five miles frbm Elgin, and four years later 
he removed to that city. As he was in poor 
health our subject took charge of the farm 
at the age of nineteen, and in 1865 he built 
his present commodious residence, his par- 
ents living with him until called to the 
world beyond. The father died June 17, 
1885, aged eighty-five years, and the 
mother November n, 1887, at the age of 
eighty-two years and three months. In early 
life they were members of the Congrega- 
tional church, but later joined the Method- 
ist Episcopal church, and died in that faith. 
The father never sought office, but was fre- 
quently called upon to fill some local posi- 
tions, the duties of which he faithfully and 
capably discharged. His first purchase in 
Kane county consisted of one hundred and 
sixty acres of land, but this he sold, and 
purchased one hundred and twenty acres, 
which are still owned by our subject. 

Joseph Larkin, the paternal grandfather 
of our subject, was a son of Edward Larkin, 
in whose family were several sons, Joshua 
and Lorin being among the number. Joseph 
was a lumber manufacturer and was killed 
in the mill yard. He had aided the colo- 
nies in achieving their independence during 



the Revolutionary war. In Brandon, Ver- 
mont, March 24, 1785, he married Miss 
Hannah Winslow, and at that place all of 
their children were born. She was a lineal 
descent of Edward Winslow, who lived in 
England in 1560. Among his sons was 
Kenelm, and in the next generation two 
Kenelms. Kenelm Winslow, of this third 
generation, came to America with his brother 
Josiah on the Mayflower in 1629, but pre- 
vious to this time Edward Winslow, the 
second, came over in the same vessel, ac- 
companied by his brother Gilbert, they being 
among the first detachment of Pilgrims who 
landed at Plymouth Rock, May 20, 1620. 
Gilbert afterward returned to England where 
he died, but Edward was the leader of the 
colony from the beginning, was afterward 
chosen governor of the same, and possessed 
considerable ability as a statesman. Jede- 
diah Winslow, the father of Hannah, was 
born March 26, 1727, in Rochester, Massa- 
chusetts, and died in Brandon, Vermont, 
April 5, 1794, while his wife, Elizabeth 
(Goodspeed) Winslow, was born in Barn- 
stable, Massachusetts, in March, 1750. 
They had a family of ten children. 

Cyrus H. Larkin was but seven years 
old when he came with his parents to Kane 
county, where he has since made his home. 
His early education was received under the 
instruction of his father, but he afterward 
attended school in Elgin, and later was a 
student in the college at Beloit, Wisconsin. 
For five years he successfully engaged in 
teaching, but since that time has devoted 
his attention to agricultural pursuits and his 
other business interests. He is now the 
owner of four hundred acres of valuable 
farming land adjoining the city of Elgin, is 
a stockholder in the First National Bank of 
that place, and is interested in a large mer- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



269 



cantile establishment in Texas and also in 
the cattle business in that state. 

On the 24th of August, 1854, Mr. 
Larkin married Miss Jane E. Johnson, a 
daughter of Ashbel Johnson, and to them 
were born two children, (i) May, who is 
now the wife of D. B. Hoornbeek, of Al- 
pine, Texas, and has two children Brew- 
ster and Etta May; (2) Fred A., M. D. , a 
physician of Englewood, Illinois. The 
mother of these children, who was a con- 
sistent member of the Methodist church, 
died May 2, 1874. Mr. Larkin was again 
married December 27, 1888, his second 
union being with Mrs. Jeannette Crane, 
widow of Franklin Crane. 

Politically Mr. Larkin is a stanch Repub- 
lican, and has served as supervisor several 
terms and also town treasurer. He is justly 
regarded as one of the most progressive and 
reliable business men of Elgin, and in all 
life's relations merits the confidence so 
freely accorded him. His residence in Kane 
county covers a period of sixty years, during 
which he has ever borne his purt in the 
work of development and progress, and is 
therefore deserving of honorable mention 
among the pioneers. 



WILLIAM E. CONSTANT, M. D., a 
successful and popular physician and 
surgeon of St. Charles, is a native son of 
Illinois, his birth having occurred in San- 
gamon county, February 28, 1854. The 
Constant family is of French origin and was 
early founded in Kentucky, where Isaac 
Constant, our subject's grandfather, was 
born. The Doctor's father, Dr. Jacob 
Constant, was also a native of Kentucky, 
born near Winchester, in 1826, but when 
only a year old was brought to Sangamon 



county, Illinois, by his father, being num- 
bered among the pioneers of the state. The 
latter pre-empted land in Sangamon county, 
near Springfield, and from the wild tract 
developed a good farm, upon which he 
reared his family. 

At an early age Dr. Jacob Constant took 
up the study of medicine, becoming a stud- 
ent of the great Hahnemann, and later en- 
gaged in the practice of his chosen profes- 
sion, while he also owned and operated a 
farm. In Sangamon county he married 
Miss Lillian Wilson, a native of Scotland, 
and a daughter of James Wilson, also an 
early settler of Sangamon county. Mrs. 
Constant was reared and educated in Edin- 
burg, Scotland. 

In the county of his nativity, Dr. Will- 
iam E. Constant grew to manhood, and in 
its public and high schools obtained a good 
practical education. Under the direction 
of Dr. Morgan, a leading physician of 
Springfield, he commenced the study of 
medicine, and in 1881 entered Hahnemann 
Medical College, of Chicago, where he grad- 
uated \vith the class of 1883. He began 
the practice of his profession in Decatur, 
Illinois, later was located for about twenty 
months in Arcola, Douglas county, and for 
the following five years successfully engaged 
in practice in Rochelle. On selling out 
there, he came to St. Charles, where he 
soon succeeded in building up a large and 
remunerative practice. He keeps abreast 
with the latest discoveries and theories in 
the science by his perusal of medical jour- 
nals, and his skill and ability is attested by 
the liberal patronage he enjoys. 

In Rochelle, on the 28th of November, 
1888, Dr. Constant was united in marriage 
to Miss Belle Ogden, a native of Ogle coun- 
ty, Illinois, who completed her education in 



2/0 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the high school of Rochelle, and is a daugh- 
ter of John Ogden, a substantial farmer of 
Ogle county. Politically the Doctor is a 
stanch Republican, but has never aspired 
to office, preferring to give his undivided at- 
tention to his professional duties. Frater- 
nally he is a member of the Masonic lodge 
of Rochelle, and also belongs to the Knights 
of Pythias. He has made many warm 
friends since coming to St. Charles, and in 
social as well as professional circles occupies 
a prominent position. 



/CHARLES MELMS, SR., after years of 
\^ honest toil, is now living a retired life 
in the village of Hampshire. He was born 
in the village of Rostow, Pomeramia, Prus- 
sia, January 15, 1838, and is the son of 
John and Christina (Heckstadt) Melms, 
both of whom are natives of the same coun- 
try, the latter dying when our subject was 
only three years of age, and the former 
when he was nineteen years old. After the 
death of his mother, he lived with an uncle 
until fourteen years old, and then with a 
sister until he attained his majority. From 
the time he was seven years old, until the 
age of fourteen, he attended the public 
schools of his native land. In his youth he 
worked on the farm and spent one year at 
the wagonmaker's trade. In October, 
1862, he sailed from Hamburg, in the two 
masted sail vessel, Helena, and after a voy- 
age of eight weeks and two days, landed at 
New York. He came west, working two 
years at Waukesha, Wisconsin, after which 
he spent some four or five years in different 
states, going as far south as Helena, Arkan- 
sas, and points in Mississippi, Kansas, Mis- 
souri, Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin as far 
north as Lake Superior, working at what- 



ever he could find to do. He then went to 
Chicago, and on the I3th of May, 1867, 
married Christina Richter, who was born in 
TridelfiU, the province of Pomeramia, 
Prussia, and the daughter of George and 
Hannah (Krumhorn) Richter, whose lives 
were spent in Germany. She came to 
America in 18^8 at the age of twenty-three 
years. By this union five children were 
born, as follows: Charles, Jr., and Henry, 
of whom further mention is made in this 
sketch; William, in the milk business in 
Chicago; Bertha, wife of Frank Channing, 
a conductor on the Chicago, Milwaukee & 
St. Paul road, running between Hampshire 
and Chicago, and Mary, wife of John F. 
Janeck, Jr., a prominent young business 
man of Hampshire, whose sketch appears 
elsewhere in this work. 

After his marriage Mr. Melms settled 
down to business and for a time was em- 
ployed in a lumber yard and on vessels. He 
then ran a fruit and vegetable wagon two 
years in the city, saved his money and went 
into the wood and coal business, in which 
he was engaged seven years. In the mean- 
time he invested in real estate in Chicago, 
which he traded for land in Hampshire 
township, on closing out his coal business, 
and here moved with his family and en- 
gaged in farming. He secured a hundred 
and fifty acres and later bought a farm ad- 
joining consisting of one hundred and three 
acres. Subsequently he bought another 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres and a 
ten-acre timber tract, in all four hundred 
and twenty-three acres. He continued to 
actively engage in farming until March i, 
1891, when he leased the farms to his sons, 
Henry and Charles, removed to the village 
of Hampshire, built a handsome modern 
house and is living in ease and comfort. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



271 



CHARLES MELMS, JR., the son of Charles 
Melms, Sr., and Christina (Richter) Melms, 
was born in Chicago, April 28, 1868, and 
came to Kane county, in 1876, and grew to 
manhood on his father's farm on section 
14. He attended school in the Bean dis- 
trict until eighteen years of age, and from 
the time he was old enough to hold a plow 
assisted in the cultivation of the farm. He 
remained under the parental roof until 
February 24, 1891, when he was united in 
marriage at Huntley, Illinois, with Miss. 
Emma Schrader, who was born in Huntley, 
and a daughter of Henry and Dora (Dueses- 
ing) Schrader, the former a native of Han- 
over, Germany, and now residing in Hunt- 
ley, at the age of sixty-seven years. By 
this union are two sons Glen, born January 
23, 1892, and Harry, born September i, 
1894. In March, following his marriage, 
he began farming for himself, renting the 
farm of his father on section 14, for two 
years. He then came to his present farm, 
which is a well-improved dairy farm of one 
hundred and fifty acres, on which he keeps 
thirty-five head of cows, and is meeting 
with good success. In politics he is inde- 
pendent, and fraternally a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America. 

HENRY MELMS was born in Chicago, De- 
cember 10, 1869, and came to Kane county, 
Illinois, in 1876, with his parents, Charles 
Melms, Sr. , and Christina (Richter) Melms. 
He attended school in the Bean district 
during the winter months until fourteen 
years of age, and remained at home assist- 
ing his father until twenty-one years of age. 
On the 1 2th of April, 1891, he married Lena 
Reinking, who was born in Ontarioville, 
Illinois, July 5, 1870, and is a daughter of 
Deitrich and Dora (Fisher) Reinking, and to 
them have been born four children Elma, 



Myrtle, Frank and an infant. The first 
named died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. 
Melms are members of the Lutheran church 
and in politics he is a Republican. 



ROMEO W. MARSHALL, who is living 
retired in the city of Aurora, and who 
came west in 1868, was born in Trenton 
Falls, Oneida county, New York, January 
12, 1824. His father, Romeo W. Marshall, 
Sr. , born in 1787, and his grandfather, John 
Marshall, were natives of Connecticut. The 
latter served as a teamster in the Revolution- 
ary war. The Marshalls are of Scotch de- 
scent, but came to this country from Eng- 
land. There were two brothers, one locat- 
ing in Rhode Island, from which branch of 
the family our subject was descended, while 
the other located in North Carolina, and 
was an ancestor of Chief Justice Marshall. 

When a young man, R. W. Marshall, 
Sr. , moved from Connecticut to New York 
with his father, first locating in Herkimer 
county, where the father died when ninety- 
eight years old. In that county R. W. 
Marshall, Sr. , married Harriet Van Antwert, 
a daughter of Lewis Van Antwert, a native 
of Holland. Soon after their marriage they 
moved to Oneida county, New York, where 
they resided for some years, and then re- 
moved to Jefferson county, on the St. Law- 
rence river. In the vast wilderness he 
opened up a farm of two hundred acres, and 
there spent the last years of his life, dying 
in 1874. His wife passed away three years 
previous. In the war of 1812 he served for 
a short time, and for a number of years 
served as postmaster in both Oneida and 
Jefferson counties. Of their nine children 
four are yet living. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 



272 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Jefferson county, New York, where he helped 
to open up and develop the farm. His 
educational advantages were very limited, 
but he made the best use of them, and in 
after years by reading and observation he 
has become a well informed man. He re- 
mained on the home farm until twenty-six 
years of age, and on the I3th of March, 
1850, married Mary A. Jewett, of Windsor, 
Vermont, where she was reared and edu- 
cated, and a daughter of Rev. Jewett, who 
died when she was a mere child. He was 
a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
For some years previous to her marriage 
she was a teacher in the public schools. By 
this union there were three children: Phila, 
who resides at home; C. N., married and 
engaged in merchandising in Aurora; and 
Josephine, wife of John W. Miller, a busi- 
ness man of Aurora, by whom she had one 
child Marshall J. 

Soon after their marriage Mr. Marshall 
bought a farm in Jefferson county, near that 
of his father, and engaged in farming and 
butter-making for some years. Selling out 
the farm he engaged in the hotel business at 
Redwood, Jefferson county, New York, 
which he continued for five years, and in 
the fall of 1868 came to Aurora, and located 
in the suburbs of the city. In 1875 he en- 
gaged in the hotel business, and for thirteen 
years was proprietor of the city hotel, where 
he did a large and profitable business, hav- 
ing a feed barn in connection, and catering 
to the country trade. On the organization 
of the Merchants' National Bank he pur- 
chased some stock, and is now one of the 
directors of that financial institution. He 
is now residing in a neat and attractive home 
on South Lake street, where he delights to 
entertain his many friends. 

Politically Mr. Marshall is a stanch Re- 



publican, with which party he has been 
identified since its organization, having voted 
for its first presidential nominee, General 
John C. Fremont. He has voted for every 
presidential candidate of that party up to 
the present time, with one exception. He 
never wanted or would accept official posi- 
tion, giving his time and attention to his 
business interests. While not connected 
with any church organization, Mr. and Mrs. 
Marshall attended the People's church. He 
is a man of exemplary habits, upright char- 
acter, and is classed among the representa- 
tive business men of Aurora. 



WILLIAM McCREDIE. A brilliant 
example of a self-made American 
citizen and a grand exemplification of the 
progress that an ambitious foreigner can 
make in this country of unbounded oppor- 
tunities, is shown in the case of Mr. Mc- 
Credie, a leading business man of Elgin, 
whose home is at No. 138 North Gifford 
street. His wonderful success is due to his 
own energy and the high ideal which his 
lofty and laudable ambition placed before 
him. Success in any walk of life is an indi- 
cation of earnest endeavor and persevering 
effort characteristics that he possesses in 
an eminent degree. 

Born in Scotland, February 10, 1848, 
Mr. McCredie is a son of William and Mar- 
garet (Limmond) McCredie, also natives of 
that country. The father was born in Wig- 
tonshire, and was the only son of Peter and 
Margaret (Fraser) McCredie, farming peo- 
ple, who spent their entire lives in Scotland, 
the former dying at the age of sixty-two 
years, the latter at a much more advanced 
age. They had one daughter, Elizabeth, 
who married George Jamieson and both are 




WM. McCREDIE. 



-Of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



275 



now deceased. The mother of our subject 
was one of a large family of children whose 
parents were Quintin and Margaret (Mc- 
Adam) Limmond, natives of Ayrshire, Scot- 
land. 

William McCredie, Sr. , who, born in 
1806, was a farmer by occupation, emi- 
grated to Canada in 1872, but after residing 
there for seven years, he returned to his 
native land in 1879, on a visit, and died 
there. While on this side of the Atlantic 
he visited Illinois. He died in 1880, aged 
seventy-five years, a faithful member of the 
Presbyterian church and a most excellent 
man. His widow, who is also a member of 
that church, now lives with her daughter, 
Jane, in Elgin. The subject of this sketch 
is the oldest of their nine children, and, like 
all his brothers, is engaged in the creamery 
business. Quintin, who was engaged in 
business in Huntley, Illinois, died in Mc- 
Henry county, in 1888, aged thirty-eight 
years. Margaret Ann is the wife of James 
Campbell, who is also engaged in the cream- 
ery business in Jefferson, Wisconsin. Eliza- 
beth is the widow of Robert Marshall, a 
Scotch-Canadian, and is a resident of Mar- 
shall, Wisconsin. Jane lives with her 
mother in Elgin. Thomas Limmond is a 
resident of Ohio, Illinois. James makes 
his home in Earlville, this state. Robert 
Gumming lives in Mt. Morris, Ogle county, 
and Edward Limmond, in Ohio, Bureau 
county, this state. Our subject had two half 
brothers. The older, Captain Patrick Mc- 
Credie, was a sea captain, and was in sev- 
eral ship wrecks. While commanding the 
Greta, he saved the crew of the ship Great 
Britain, which was destroyed during a gale 
on the British Channel, March u, 1876, 
and for his bravery displayed by this act he 
received a written communication from the 

13 



committee of " Liverpool Shipwreck and 
Humane Society " commending his gallant 
service. John McCredie, the other half 
brother, was also a sailor for twenty years, 
but when the family came to America he 
accompanied them, and .now lives with his 
widowed sister, Mrs. Marshall, in Wis- 
consin. 

Reared on a farm, William McCredie 
continued to engage in agricultural pursuits 
until twenty-seven years of age, when he 
became interested in the creamery business, 
working for the firm of Braman, Horr & 
Warner, > at.-Elyria, Lorain county, Ohio, 
far three years. He then came to Algon- 
quin, Illinois, and near that place engaged 
in the same business with Robert McAdam 
until 1 88 1, when he purchased his partner's 
interest after being together for three years. 
Since then he has carried on operations at 
different places, including Barrington Sta- 
tion, Barrington Center, and Elgin, where 
he still resides in active business. He owns 
one creamery in Lee county which is under 
the management of his brother James, and 
is also interested in many others. For 
twenty years he has successfully engaged 
in this business, and the prosperity that has- 
crowned his efforts is certainly well de- 
served for in him are embraced the charac- 
teristics of an unbending integrity and in- 
dustry that never flags. 

On the a'jd of January, 1884, in Halton 
county, Ontario, Mr. McCredie was united 
in marriage with Miss Mary Jane Marshall, 
a native of Canada and daughter of John 
and Margaret (Archibald) Marshall, who 
emigrated from Scotland to that country at 
an early day. Her parents celebrated 
their golden wedding in 1892, at which 
time all of their large family of children 
were present as well as many other gueets. 



276 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Since then the father has passed away, dy- 
ing in 1896, but the mother is still living on 
the old home farm in Canada. With one 
exception her children are also living. 
Mr. and Mrs. McCredie have three children, 
namely: Maggie Jane, William, and Mar- 
ian Elizabeth. ' 

Politically Mr. McCredie is independent, 
generally voting for the man rather than 
the party, though he is rather inclined to- 
ward Democracy. He is a prominent Ma- 
son, belonging to the blue lodge of Barring- 
ton. Illinois; L. L. Munn chapter; Bethel 
commandery, Elgin; and Medinah Temple, 
Knights of the Mystic Shrine, of Chicago. 
With the First Congregational church of 
Elgin he and his wife hold membership and 
by all who know them they are held in high 
regard. He has several times visited his 
native land, but has no desire to return 
there to live. As a representative business 
man and highly respected citizen of Elgin 
none are more deserving of honorable men- 
tion in a work of this character than Will- 
iam McCredie. 



WILLIAM BURTON has been identi- 
fied with Kane county for more than 
half a century, and has contributed his share 
to its material progress and prosperity, but 
has now laid aside all business cares and is 
enjoying a well-earned rest at 'his pleasant 
home in Elgin. He was born November 
26, 1821, in Sherrington, Province of Que- 
bec, about twenty-seven miles from Mon- 
treal, and is a son of John and Jane (String- 
er) Burton. 

The father was born in North Burton, 
Yorkshire, England, in 1791, and in 1819 
emigrated to Canada, locating in Sherring- 
ton, where he engaged in farming. He had 



three brothers, namely: William, Richard 
and Francis. He was short of stature, of 
light complexion, of positive character, but 
of gentle disposition. In religious belief he 
was an Episcopalian, as was also his wife. 
In manner she was rather firm, and was char- 
itable to an eminent degree. She was born 
January 31, 1796, in Hunenby, Yorkshire, 
England, of which her parents, Richard and 
Hannah (Wallace) Stringer, were also na- 
tives. They removed to Canada in 1818, 
and in that country her father died, but 
her mother spent her last days in Kane 
county. Besides Mrs. Burton, they had 
three sons and one daughter, namely: 
Mark, George, John and Alice, wife of Ar- 
thur Allison, all now deceased, with the ex- 
ception of Robert, who makes his home in El- 
gin. The father of our subject continued to 
reside in Sherrington, Canada, until killed at 
the battle of Odeltown, November 9, 1838. 
The mother died in Elgin township, Kane 
county, April 9, 1864. 

In the family of this worthy couple were 
nine children, of whom William is the old- 
est; Richard, born September 13, 1823, 
died in August, 1897; Mary, born August 
14, 1825, married George Marshall; John, 
born September 19, 1827, died in Elgin, in 
1870; Francis, born December 14, 1829, of 
whom see sketch elsewhere in this volume; 
George B., born February 9, 1831, died De- 
cember 12, 1838; Alice, born December 7, 
1833, married George Church, and died in 
Dayton, Washington, November 19, 1886; 
Mark, born September 6, 1835, died July 
27, 1883, in Helena, Montana; and Annie, 
born July 4, 1838, married George Cook- 
man, and died April 11, 1891, at Mason, 
Iowa. 

Upon the home farm in Canada, William 
Burton was reared, and in the schools of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



277 



the neighborhood acquired his education. 
On leaving the parental roof at the age of 
sixteen, he went to Albany, New York, to 
learn the blacksmith's trade, but not liking 
that occupation, he obtained work on a 
farm in Cherry Valley, New York, where he 
remained for two years. After his father's 
death he returned home to look after the 
family, remaining in Canada until 1844, 
when he left for the far west, accompanied 
by his uncle Robert, uncle Mark and brother 
Richard. They made the journey by way 
of the lakes to Chicago, and from there on 
foot to Kane county. 

In 1845 William Burton purchased a 
tract of two hundred and forty acres in 
Plato township, to the cultivation and im- 
provement of which he devoted his time 
and attention for sixteen years. Having se- 
cured a comfortable competence, he then 
retired from the arduous duties of farm life 
and removed to Elgin, where he erected a 
pleasant residence on Walnut avenue. Five 
years ago he sold his farm, which was one of 
the best in Kane county. While engaged 
in agricultural pursuits, he and his brother 
Richard built a cheese factory in Genoa, 
De Kalb county, Illinois, which they op- 
erated for five yeare. There they also 
bought a tract of two hundred and ninety 
acres of land, which they converted into a 
dairy faun, keeping thereon fifty head of 
cattle. When they finally divided the prop- 
erty, the brother took the farm and our sub- 
ject the factory, which he later sold. He 
also built the first factory in Plato town- 
ship, Kane county, in partnership with John 
McDonald, but later sold his interest. 
Upon his farm in that township he kept 
forty head of cows for dairy purposes. 

In St. Charles, Kane county, Mr. Bur- 
ton was married January i, 1855, to Miss 



Sarah Poole, a daughter of Charles Poole 
and wife, natives of England, now deceased. 
Her father lived to the extreme old age of 
one hundred and nine years. The children 
born of this union were as follows: Clara, 
born December 24, 1855, married Samuel 
Buckley, a farmer of Marshall county, Kan- 
sas, and died July 10, 1874; Georgiana 
May, born May 6, 1857, is the wife of 
George Burton, of Genoa, De Kalb county; 
Alice Maud Mary, born May 13, 1859, is 
the wife of Peter Young, a resident of Pot- 
tawatomie county, Kansas; Ernest W., born 
December 9, 1860, is a carpenter living in 
Elgin; and John Francis, born February 
21, 1863, is a farmer of Marshall county, 
Kansas. The mother of these children, 
who was a consistent member of the United 
Brethren church, died March 27, 1863. 

Mr. Burton was again married, July 18, 
1863, his second union being with Miss 
Jane Cookman, a native of Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, as were her parents, Francis and 
Maria (Dibbs) Cookman. She was a Meth- 
odist in religious belief, and died in that 
faith, June 16, 1892, being laid to rest at 
Udina, Kane county, where Mr. Burton's 
mother, his children and grandchild have 
all been buried. By his second marriage 
he had four children, namely: Margaret, 
born June 3, 1865, is the wife of Nelson 
Their and lives in Missouri; William C., 
born July 23, 1867, died August 30, 1880; 
Sarah Ann, born June 28, 1870, keeps house 
for her father; and Mary, born February 
26, 1872, died August 20, 1880. 

At local elections, where no issue is in- 
volved, Mr. Burton votes independent of 
party ties, but at other times never fails to 
support the Republican ticket. While liv- 
ing on his farm he efficiently served as 
school director most of the time. Prior to 



2 7 8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



coming to Elgin he held membership in the 
United Brethren church, but as there was 
no church of that denomination in this city, 
he united with the Methodist congregation. 
During the long years he has been a resi- 
dent of Kane county, he has championed 
every movement designed to promote the 
general welfare, has supported every enter- 
prise for the public good, and has materially 
aided in the advancement of all social, edu- 
cational and moral interests. After a use- 
ful and honorable career he can well afford 
to lay aside all business cares and live in 
ease and retirement. His daughter pre- 
sides over his home, which, in its appoint- 
ments, evinces the refinement and culture 
of the inmates. 



JAMES SHAW, city librarian and clerk 
of the city court, Aurora, Illinois, was 
born in Lancashire, England, July 9, 1840, 
and is the son of James and Anna (Gould) 
Shaw, both of whom are natives of England. 
Thre parents came to America during the in- 
fancy of our subject and sertled in Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, where James was 
reared and educated in the common schools 
and graduated from the high school. After 
leaving school he entered the office of the 
daily " Chronicle," at Portsmouth, to learn 
the printer's trade and was there nearly five 
year. 

In the summer of 1862, Mr. Shaw en- 
listed as a private in Company K, Sixteenth 
Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteer In- 
fantry, with which he was sent to the 
southeast, the regiment being assigned to 
the Nineteenth Army Corps, under com- 
mand of General Banks. It was engaged in 
the Port Hudson campaign. His term of 
enlistment expiring, he returned home in the 



fall of 1863. After spending a year as clerk 
in the navy yard at Portsmouth, he came 
west to Chicago, and engaged in the print- 
ing business. In the following winter, how- 
ever, he went south to Mobile, Alabama, 
being one of the army of "carpetbaggers" 
and was there some six years, engaged in 
newspaper publishing, and assisted in re- 
construction generally. In 1873 he came 
north and in 1874 joined Pierce Burton in 
the publication of the Aurora "Herald." He 
remained with that paper six years, when 
the partnership with Mr. Burton was dis- 
solved. He was soon afterward elected 
clerk of the city court, to fill a vacancy, and 
by re-election has held the office until the 
present time. In 1884 he was appointed 
librarian, which position he has also held 
until the present time. In 1888 he was 
appointed by recommendation of the whole 
bar, official reporter of the circuit court of 
Kane county, which position he held for 
three years. He ran the Aurora Centre for 
the University Extension Course of Lectures 
for popular instruction, Mrs. Pierce Burton 
being the first secretary, and our subject the 
second one, which office he has since con- 
tinued to fill. 

On the 30th of June, 1885, Mr. Shaw 
was united in marriage with Miss Ella D. 
Lowd, of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, to 
which place he returned for that purpose. 
Her parents were William D. and Rebecca 
Lowd, on the mother's side being a direct 
descendent of the martyr, John Rogers, who 
was burned- at the stake during the reign of 
Bloody Queen Mary. The great-great- 
grandfather of Mrs. Lowd was for many 
years a minister, at the little stone church 
on one of the Isles of Shoals, on the coast 
of New Hampshire, and now a famous 
watering place or summer resort. To Mr. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



279 



and Mrs. Shaw two children have been born 
Alice Ada, attending the schools of Aurora, 
and Marian H., who died at the age of 
seven years. 

Mrs. Shaw is a consistent member of the 
Episcopal church. Fraternally Mr. Shaw 
is a member of the Masonic order, and also 
of the Grand Army of the Republic. In 
politics he is a Republican, and takes an 
active interest in his party. He is a man of 
studious habits, of positive convictions and 
indomitable energy, and for what he believes 
to be right, will stand against all odds. 



OAMUEL L. ADAMS, who is now effi- 
O ciently serving as justice of the peace 
in St. Charles, was for many years one of 
the active, enterprising and representative 
business men and farmers of Kane county, 
dating his residence here from the spring of 
1860. He was born in Cavendish, Wind- 
sor county, Vermont, June 16, 1820, and is 
a worthy representative of a very old and 
prominent family of New England, belong- 
ing to the "presidential branch " of the 
Adams family. Benjamin Adams, the grand- 
father of our subject, was a native of Mas- 
sachusetts, and was one of the minute men 
of the Revolutionary war, taking part in the 
battle of Bunker Hill. 

Samuel Adams, Sr. , our subject's father, 
was born in Vermont about 1790, and man- 
ifested his patriotism by serving as a 
soldier in the war of 1812. He married 
Miss Calista French, also a native of Ver- 
mont, and a daughter of Josiah French, 
who also belonged to an honored family of 
Massachusetts. Samuel Adams, Sr., was 
a tanner and currier by trade, but in early 
life followed farming. He was one of the 
most prominent and influential men of his 



town and county, served as justice of the 
peace for nearly half a century, and also 
filled the offices of selectman, town clerk 
and other positions of honor and trust. He 
died in Vermont in 1875, and his wife passed 
away the year previous. 

Mr. Adams, of this review, is the oldest 
in their family of seven children, two sons 
and five daughters, who reached mature 
years, the others being Josiah Quincy, who 
still resides at the' old homestead in Caven- 
dish, Vermont; Marietta, who is now the 
widow of Friend Weeks, of Rutland county, 
Vermont, and is now a resident of Caven- 
dish; and Marcella, a resident of Chester, 
Vermont, and the widow of Ira H. Adams, 
who died in 1896. Jane, Ellen and Betsy 
are deceased. 

In his birthplace Samuel L. Adams 
spent the days of his boyhood and youth, 
and in the schools of that place obtained a 
fair education, which enabled him to engage 
in teaching for three years in Vermont. 
He also learned the tanner's and currier's 
trade which he followed for a number of 
years before coming to Kane county, Illi- 
nois in 1860. Landing here in March of 
that year, he located on a farm in St. 
Charles township, where he engaged in ag- 
ricultural pursuits until 1876, and also fol- 
lowed school teaching during three winter 
terms. On selling his farm, which adjoined 
the corporation limits of St. Charles, he lo- 
cated in the village where he has engaged 
in merchandising at three different times, 
some seven or eight years in all, the first 
three years being devoted to the grocery 
trade. 

On the 2d of July, 1848, in the town of 
Cavendish, Windsor county, Vermont, was 
celebrated the marriage of Mr. Adams and 
Miss Betsey M. Parker, also a native of that 



280 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



state, and a daughter of Dr. Isaiah Parker, 
who belonged to a Massachusetts family, 
and lived to the advanced age of ninety-six 
years. During her girlhood Mrs. Adams 
obtained an excellent education and success- 
fully engaged in teaching both in Vermont 
and after coming to Illinois. She died Jan- 
uary 26, 1882, leaving a sorrowing husband 
and many friends to mourn her loss. Hav- 
ing no children of their own, Mr. and Mrs. 
Adams adopted Ella D. Howard at the age 
of four years. She was reared and educated 
by them, and is now the wife of A. D. Bell, 
of St. Charles. 

Although not old enough to vote at the 
Presidential election of 1840, he carried a 
banner in the processions during the cam- 
paign of that year, his interests being with 
" Tippecanoe and Tyler, too," and on be- 
coming a voter he supported the Whig party 
until the organization of the Republican 
party, voting for John C. Fremont in 1856. 
He has served as a delegate to many of the 
county conventions of his party, and has 
been called upon to fill the offices of super- 
visor seven years, township trustee, and 
commissioner of highways twelve years. He 
was one of a committee of three who built 
the present bridge across Fox river at St. 
Charles, and was also secretary of the build- 
ing committee of supervisors when the pres- 
ent fine court house and jail of Kane county 
were erected. He has been a member of 
the old town council, was president of the 
board of trustees, and has now acceptably 
served as justice of the peace for five years. 
In all of these various positions he has dis- 
charged his duties with promptness and fidel- 
ity, proving a most capable and popular 
official. Socially he is a prominent mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, is past grand of his lodge, has served 



as secretary of his lodge and also the en- 
campment in the grand lodge several terms, 
has been chief patriot and filled all the chairs 
in the encampment. For thirty years he 
has been identified with the interests of 
Kane county and has become widely and fa- 
vorably known throughout this section of the 
state. 



CHARLES OSCAR CUMMINGS, de- 
ceased, was born in New Albany, In- 
diana, June 6, 1845, died at his residence in 
New Orleans, Louisana, August 16, 1882. 
About 1850, his father moved to New Or- 
leans, which continued to be the family 
residence. He attended private schools in 
that city, and later Professor Soule's Busi- 
ness College. His father having died in 1855, 
he early became the mainstay of the family 
and contributed to the support of his mother 
and sisters from the age of fifteen. He 
secured a place as clerk in a store, and while 
thus engaged, attended business college. 
Having saved from his earnings, he later in 
partnership with his brother-in-law, went 
into the commission business, in which he 
prospered through strict integrity and honest 
dealing, accumulated a comfortable com- 
petence. Owing to ill-health, he traveled 
in the north every summer, sometimes on 
the Atlantic coast, and again in the lake 
regions of Wisconsin and in Maine. In 
July, 1882, he bought a farm of one hundred 
and twenty acres in Kane county, near his 
wife's birthplace, in order that he might 
have a home of his own to go in summer 
when he so desired. But he never had the 
pleasure of spending his time on the place, 
his death occurring but a month later. He 
was an affectionate husband and father, 
honored and respected by a wide circle of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



281 



friends. In politics he was a Democrat 
and a Confederate during the war. He was 
reared a Methodist but when married he 
united with the Episcopal church. 

Charles O. Cummings was the son of 
Thomas Cummings, who was born in Balti- 
more, November 25, 1816, and at Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, October 10, 1838, married 
Mary Jane McConnell, a daughter of Hugh 
McConnell and Mary (Perrine) McConnell. 
She was born in New York, November 24, 
1822, and is yet living in New Orleans. 
The mother of Thomas Cummings died 
when he was quite young. His father mar- 
rying again, he left home and soon lost 
track of his family and therefore knew little 
of his ancestors. He learned ship carpen- 
tering in his youth and held a position for 
many years on boats running north from 
New Orleans. While repairing a wheel of 
his boat he got wet, took cold, and after a 
short illness died November 15, 1855. 

The subject of this sketch married in 
New Orleans, January I, 1872, Miss Susan 
Jane Babcock, who was there on a visit to 
her half-brother, Professor George Soule, who 
was a Confederate colonel in the Rebellion, 
was taken prisoner at Shiloh and taken to 
Johnson's Island for five months, in whose 
business college Mr. Cummings had received 
his business education. She was born in 
Barrington, Yates county, New York, April 
6, 1844, and is a daughter of William H. 
and Cornelia E. (Hogeboom) Babcock. The 
latter was born in Green county. New York, 
November 8, 1814, and died September 11, 
1893. She was the daughter of Andrew 
and Julia (Distant) Hogeboom, the father 
being a farmer by occupation. His wife at- 
tained the age of ninety years. Cornelia 
E. Hogeboom first married Ebon Soule, a 
Frenchman, by whom she had three sons, 



Andrew, George and Stephen. George is a 
professor in a business college in New Or- 
leans, while the other two live in California. 

William H. Babcock. the father of Mrs. 
Cumrnings, was born in New York, Octo- 
ber 10," 1816, and died in Kane county, Il- 
linois, September 12, 1884. By occupation 
he was a farmer after coming west in 1854. 
By trade he was a mason, and an excellent 
workman. On coming to Kane county, he 
settled on section 30, Hampshire township, 
where he purchased forty acres of land ad- 
joining a forty-acre tract his wife received 
from her father. He was the son of Abiram 
Babcock and Susan (Lee) Babcock, the lat- 
ter being a cousin of Robert E. Lee. To 
William H. Babcock and wife nine children 
were born as follows: Sallie, who died at 
the age of six months; Mary, who married 
David Davis, and lives in Beloit, Wiscon- 
sin; Julia, who married Hiram S. De Witt, 
and is living in Hampshire, Illinois; Abiram 
Lee, who resides in California; Susan J., 
widow of our subject; Lucy, who married 
James F. Bell, and is living on section 30, 
Hampshire township; Charlotte, wife of 
John Oesterman, residing on the old home 
farm on section 30; and Phebe E., who 
married Edward Everitt Crawford, a mer- 
chant of Genoa, Illinois. One son was a 
member of the Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry 
in the war for the Union. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Cummings four chil- 
dren were born in New Orleans Mary Cor- 
nelia, Charlotte E., William Arthur and 
George Bidwell. The daughters are teach- 
ers of recognized ability in Kane county. 
Mrs. Cummings resides on the farm, to which 
she gives her personal attention. She also 
owns a house and lots in Hampshire and 
several fine building lots in Elgin, in a select 
quarter of the city. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



/^>EORGE P. MARSHALL, deceased, 
Vj was one of the honored pioneers and 
highly respected citizens of Kane county, 
with whose agricultural interests he was 
prominently identified for many years. He 
was born May 9, 1817, in Ryther, York- 
shire, England, a son of James and Ann 
(Parker) Marshall, also natives of that place. 
In that country they spent their entire lives, 
the father dying in 1883, at the advanced 
age of ninety-five years; the mother Au- 
gust 22, 1872, at the age of eighty-five. 

In 1842, at the age of twenty-five years, 
George P. Marshall crossed the broad At- 
lantic and first located in Canada, where he 
spent two years. In his native land he had 
learned the carpenter's trade, but after com- 
ing to the United States he devoted his en- 
ergies exclusively to farming. It was in 
1844 that he became a resident of Kane 
county, at which time most of the land was 
still in its primitive condition, and he and 
his young wife were forced to endure all of 
the hardships and trials incident to pioneer 
life. After renting a farm for two years 
near Plato, he purchased seventy-seven 
acres on section 29, Elgin township, and 
thereon erected the first frame house in the 
township. He also employed the first 
teacher in his district, the pupils being two 
of his own children and one of the teacher's. 
Upon the farm which he first bought, he 
continued to reside until called to his final 
rest October 3, 1881. In England he had 
joined the Odd Fellows Society, but in this 
country held membership in no secret or- 
ganization. He was always loyal to his 
adopted. country and her institutions, and 
most acceptably served his fellow citizens 
as school trustee, road commissioner and 
thistle commissioner. 

Mr. Marshall was married in Canada, in 



1842, to Miss Mary Burton, who was born 
in Sharington, near Montreal, August 14, 
1825, adaughter of John and Jane (Stringer) 
Burton, and granddaughter of Richard and 
Hannah (Garbutt) Stringer. Her father was 
born in North Burton, Yorkshire, England, 
in 1792, and was a son of Richard and 
Mary Burton. In 1818 he emigrated to 
Canada, and was killed November 9, 1838, 
at the age of forty -six years, while serving 
in the militia during the rebellion in that 
country. Mrs. Marshall's mother was a na- 
tive of Hull, England, born in 1794, and 
died at the age of sixty-seven years. 

The children born to our subject and 
his wife were as follows: Ann Jane married 
Hosea E. Perkins, who was born in Jeffer- 
son county, New York, November 8, 1819,' 
but when seven years old went to Ohio, 
and in the fall of 1841 came to Illinois; Le- 
vina is now Mrs. Padelford; William is en- 
gaged in farming at East Plato, Kane coun- 
ty; Charles H. is a mason and builder living 
at Chico, California; George F. follows 
farming near Wasco Station, Campton 
township, Kane county; Caroline L. is the 
wife of Hiram Brown, of Port Walthal, 
Virginia; Ellen L. is the wife of Millard 
Starr, who is engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits near Pingree station; Richard S. is a 
merchant of South Elgin; Frederick J. is 
engaged in farming near Plato Center; and 
Henry L. is living with his mother in South 
Elgin. 

Mrs. Marshall well remembers the region 
around her birthplace, which was in the 
midst of a deep forest, and among the prim- 
itive scenes of frontier life she was reared 
to womanhood. Her father had to clear 
away the trees in order to secure space for 
his home, and the family were obliged to 
carry their butter and other produce to 




GEORGE P. MARSHALL. 



1* TE 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



287 



market, walking the entire distance of 
eighteen miles. Thus inured to such a life 
she was well fitted to endure the hardships 
which surrounded her early residence in 
Kane county. In coming to this state she 
and her husband came by way of the Wel- 
land canal and great lakes from Buffalo to 
Chicago, and thence by wagon to Kane 
county. Game was still quite plentiful in 
this region, furnishing the early settlers 
with most of their meat, and most of the 
land was still wild prairie and timber. She 
has watched with interest the wonderful 
changes that have since taken place. 



RICHARD S. MARSHALL, son of 
George P. Marshall, is one of the rep- 
resentative and prominent business men of 
South Elgin. He is a native of Kane coun- 
ty, born on his father's farm, on section 29, 
Elgin township, May 16, 1856, and there 
remained until sixteen years of age, aiding 
in the work and attending the district 
schools of the neighborhood. At that age 
he began to work for others as a farm hand 
and was thus employed until he attained his 
majority. 

On the 22d of February, 1877, at the 
age of twenty years, Mr. Marshall was uni- 
ted in marriage with Miss Clara Campbell, 
a native of Vermont, who when a child of 
eleven years came to Illinois with her par- 
ents, Emmett and Marian Campbell, the 
former of Scotch descent. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Marshall have been born three chil- 
dren, namely: Bertha, Albert and Frank. 

After his marriage Mr. Marshall rented 
a farm of one hundred and. eighty-three 
acres, which he operated for three years, 
and for the same length of time engaged in 
agricultural pursuits upon a farm in Hamp- 



shire township belonging to M. C. Getzel- 
man. He then rented the old homestead 
for two years, and at the end of that time 
removed to South Elgin, where he was first 
engaged in buying and selling stock for six 
years, meeting with success in his new un- 
dertaking. This naturally led to his enter- 
ing the meat business, and to his market he 
subsequently added a stock of groceries. 
On the 8th of January, 1897, his store was 
destroyed by fire, probably the work of in- 
cendiaries, but the same spring he rebuilt 
on the new trolly line west of the Fox river 
and has built up a good trade for a small 
village a trade that is constantly increas- 
ing. He is an enterprising, progressive 
business man of known reliability, and his 
"genial, pleasant manner has made him quite 
popular in both business and social circles. 



ISAAC T. BEVIER, who for many years 
was one of the leading merchants of Au- 
rora, was born at Leurenkill, Ulster county, 
New York, March 13, 1818. His parents, 
Johannis and Elizabeth (Teachout) Bevier, 
were both natives of New York state. The 
name was originally spelled Bovier, and is 
of French origin. The Boviers were of the 
Huguenot faith and fled from France to Hol- 
land, during the time of those religious 
persecutions and found refuge with friends 
in the Palatinate. Louis Bovier, or Bevier, 
emigrated from Frenken, on or about March 
5, 1675, and on arriving in America, they 
stopped temporarily at New Amsterdam, 
afterwards at New Paltz, and were among 
the original twelve patentees of that place. 
They had a family of eight children Marie, 
Jean, Abraham, Samuel, Andrius, Louis, 
Esther and Solomon. Abraham Bevier 
married Rachel Quernory, and they settled 



288 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



at Warwarsing, New York. Their children 
were Louis, Annie, Cornelius, Samuel, Ja- 
cobus, Abraham, Maria, Johannis, Benjamin 
and Daniel. Johannis, the father of our 
subject, married Elizabeth Teachout, and 
their children were Mary Ann", Cornelius 
H., Esther B., Simon J., Isaac T. , Corne- 
lius A., Sarah E. , Rachel M., Antoinette, 
Sarah J., William E. and Harriet E., all, 
excepting Sarah E., living to the age of 
maturity. 

Isaac T. Bevier obtained his education 
in the public schools at Leurenkill, residing 
in boyhood upon his father's farm. In 
boyhood he learned the tailor's trade at 
Elmira, New York, to which place the 
family had removed. After learning his 
trade he worked at Elmira as a journeyman 
for several years. In the meantime he 
married, March 11, 1841, Miss Sarah Brad- 
ner, daughter of William and Frances 
Emily (Wood) Bradner, of Goshen, New 
York. In 1844 he came to Aurora, and de- 
ciding to make this city his future home, 
returned to Elmira for his family. In 1848 
he commenced the tailoring business here 
in partnership with the late William Mc- 
Michen, each conducting an establishment, 
one on each side of the river, but in part- 
nership. After a year or so, Mr. Bevier 
retired from busmess on account of failing 
eyesight, after which he served as constable 
and collector for several years. In 1858 
he went into the drug business on Broad- 
way with J. D. Moore, but soon afterwards 
purchased his partner's interest and contin- 
ued the business alone up to the time of 
his death, which occurred January 3, 1884. 
He was subject to heart trouble, and died 
suddenly in Florida, where he had gone to 
gain health and strength. His remains 
were brought back to Aurora and buried in 



Spring Lake cemetery, escorted to the grave 
by the Knight Templars and Odd Fellows, 
of which in the former body he had been 
prelate, and had filled all the offices in the 
Odd Fellows society. Mr. and Mrs. Bevier 
had a family of four children as follows: 
Cornelia F., who resides with her mother. 
William B., who married November 25, 
1898, Emma S. Borwell, of Fon du Lac, 
Wisconsin, by whom he has two children, 
George, S. , born August 20, 1872, and Ben- 
jamin B., born April 9, 1880; John E. , 
who was married October 26, 1868, to Mary 
J. Seymour, by whom he has one child, 
Frank H., born June 23, 1874; Frank H., 
who died April 8, 1873. John E. Bevier 
died in Aurora, August 20, 1875. 

Mr. Bevier was a public-spirited man 
and in addition to those already mentioned; 
he held the position of street commissioner 
several years and highway commissioner for 
nine years. With his wife he was an at- 
tendant of the Congregational church. As 
a citizen he was well known and univer- 
sally esteemed. His death was a sincere 
loss to the community in which he had so 
long resided. Mrs. Bevier still resides in 
Aurora in a pleasant home at No. 285 Main 
street, and is also held in the highest 
esteem. 



MORRIS CLINTON TOWN, now de- 
ceased, was for many years one of the 
best known business men of Elgin. He was 
of English and French extraction, his an- 
cestors settling in America prior to the Rev- 
olutionary war. His father, Bester Town, 
was born in New York August 20, 1794. 
He was reared in his native state, and Sep- 
tember 22, 1816, married Betsy M. Martin, 
a native of Vermont, born in 1795. For 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



289 



some years after marriage he followed farm- 
ing in Washington county, New York. In 
1824 he removed with his family to Erie 
county, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in 
hotel keeping and farming, but later com- 
menced the manufacture of hats, and em- 
barked in the mercantile trade. His death 
occurred in Erie county, Pennsylvania, De- 
cember 2, 1870, and he was followed to the 
grave by his loving wife, January 22, 1872. 
During the war of 1812 he served his coun- 
try as one of its soldiers. 

Morris C. Town was born at Granville, 
Washington county, New York, February 
7, 1818, and was eldest in a family of eight 
children. His boyhood and youth were 
spent at home with his parents and he 
learned the hatter's trade in his father's 
manufactory, receiving at the same time a 
common-school education. At the age of 
twenty-two he began life for himself as a 
merchant, at North East, Erie county, 
Pennsylvania, and was quite successful. 
But life in the east was not suited to his 
temperament. He wished to broaden out, 
and so resolved to come west. Accordingly 
in the spring of 1846 he came to Chicago 
and commenced in mercantile business, 
which he continued until the fall of 1847, 
when he came to Elgin and for three years 
was one of its most prosperous merchants. 
He then opened a banking office, and in 
1851 secured a charter from the state. In 
1858 he sold his banking business and re- 
moved to Chicago, where he remained until 
1860, when he again came to Elgin and for 
the second time engaged in merchandising. 
In 1862 the banking house of Lawrence 
Pease & Town was established and Mr. 
Town assumed the general management of 
the same. In the summer of 1865 the First 
National Bank of Elgin was organized and 



he was elected cashier, a position he held 
for a number of years, and was then elected 
president, serving as such until his death. 

Mr. Town was twice married. His first 
wife, whom he married August 27, 1839, 
was Miss Hannah S. -Oviatt, born at Hud- 
son, Ohio, July 27, 1819, and by her he 
had one child, Helen S., who became the 
wife of William O. De Long, and who is 
now living at Titusville, Pennsylvania. 
Mrs. Town passed to her reward in 1843, 
and Mr. Town married Miss Maria Sel- 
kregg, November 12, 1844, at North East, 
Pennsylvania. She was a native of that 
state, born at Colt's Station, Erie county, 
December 19, 1821, and a daughter of Osee 
and Harriet (Robinson) Selkregg, natives 
of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, respect- 
ively. Six children were born of this union, 
as follows: Ella L. , born September 30, 
1845, is now Mrs. L. B. Hamlin, of Elgin; 
Morris Clarence, born July 4, 1847, died 
January 8, 1850; Frank, born April 27, 
1849, died June 5, 1881; Harriet E., born 
March 27, 1851, married John H. Volk, 
and is now living at Mont Clare, Illinois; 
Carrie M. , born May 27, 1855, is the wife 
of W. W. Sherwin, of Elgin; and Morris 
Clinton died in infancy. Mrs. Town died 
January 26, 1897. She was a member of 
the Congregational church, a true Christian 
woman, one who was greatly esteemed 
by all. 

After a residence in Elgin of forty-five 
years, save for a short time spent in Chica- 
go, already mentioned, Mr. Town passed 
from this life, his death taking place July 
31, 1892, at the age of seventy-four years 
and five months. He was a man of more 
than ordinary ability, and did much to 
make Elgin the thriving city it now is. 
Few enterprises of a public nature but what 



290 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



secured from him financial as well as moral 
support. He added much to the city by 
the erection of a fine business block which 
bears his name. A friend of education, he 
was one of the founders of the Elgin Acad- 
emy, and served as one of its directors un- 
til his death. In 1878 he was elected a 
local director in the Elgin National Watch 
Company, -a position which he held until 
his death. Fraternally he was an Odd 
Fellow, and was one of the charter mem- 
bers of Kane lodge, at Elgin. 



MRS. D. P. GRAY, of Aurora, Illinois, 
was born in Covington, Tioga county, 
Pennsylvania, April 7, 1817. Her father, 
Thomas Putnam, was a native of Massa- 
chusetts, and the son of Elijah Putnam, a 
cousin of Israel Putnam, of Revolutionary 
fame. Thomas Putnam married Hannah 
Huntington, a native of Massachusetts, 
where he then resided. Soon after his 
marriage he moved to Pennsylvania, and 
settled in Tioga county, when he followed 
his trade of saddle-tree maker for sev- 
eral years, and there reared a family. 
His wife died in Pennsylvania, and he 
later married again. He was a very 
prominent man, serving for some years as 
postmaster of Covington, and also justice of 
the peace. For some years he was a gen- 
eral in the state militia. 

Our subject was reared in her native 
town, where she received a fairly good ed- 
ucation, and on March 3, 1833, a young 
lady of sixteen years, gave her hand in mar- 
riage to L. W. Gray, a native of Ohio, born 
July ii, 1812, but who was reared in Tio- 
ga county, Pennsylvania, where he received 
a good education in the common schools, 
and in Wellsborough College. After their 



marriage they began their domestic life in 
Covington, Pennsylvania, where he worked 
at his trade of tanner and currier, and car- 
ried on that business for six years. In 
1838, they moved west, first locating in 
Oquawka, Henderson county, Illinois, and 
six months later moving to Henderson, 
where he was elected constable and served 
until 1843. 

In that year they moved to Kane 
county, where Mr. Gray bought land near 
Aurora, which he farmed some four or five 
years. He then sold the farm and moved 
into Aurora, purchasing some land, which 
now lies within the city limits. He laid 
out an addition to the city, on the west 
side, known as Gray's addition to Aurora. 
He served as one of the first aldermen of 
the city, and was continued in that office until 
his death, October 10, 1881, at the age of 
seventy years. 

Politically Mr. Gray was identified with 
the Democratic party, and was a firm be- 
liever and a stanch advocate of its princi- 
ples. A friend of education, he served for 
some years as a member of the school board, 
and did much to advance the educational 
interests of his adopted city. Progressive 
in all things, he encouraged every enter- 
prise that he considered would have a ten- 
dency to advance the material interests of 
Aurora. In his death the city lost one of 
its best men. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gray were the parents of 
seven children, of whom four survive. John 
married Lucretia Smith, of Henry county, 
and they now make their home in Jefferson, 
Iowa, where he is engaged in business. He 
was a member of the Forty-fifth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, and during the last two 
years of his service was on the staff of 
General McKean. Thomas P. was also a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



291 



soldier in the late war, serving in the Elev- 
enth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was 
wounded near Pittsburg Landing. For 
some years he has been employed in the 
pension office at Washington. He married 
Hetty Headley, and they made their home 
in Washington. Ann married Salmon Den- 
nison, of Aurora, who served during the 
late war, as a member of Company H, One 
Hundred and Twenty-fourth Regiment Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry. He died in Au- 
rora, in January, 1891. Wright married 
Rosella Miles, and resides in Windsor, Col- 
orado. Warren died in infancy. Grant 
died in early childhood. Wells grew to ma- 
ture years, and died when about thirty-five 
years of age. Mrs. Gray has twelve grand- 
children, and six great-grandchildren. She 
is a member of the Peoples church of Au- 
rora, and is a woman who is held in the 
highest esteem by all who know her. 



EDWARD BAKER, a leading merchant 
of St. Charles, is an important factor 
in business circles, and his popularity is 
well deserved, as in him are embraced the 
characteristics of an unbending integrity, 
unabated energy and industry that never 
flags. As a public-spirited citizen he is 
thoroughly interested in whatever tends to 
promote the moral, intellectual and material 
welfare of the community. 

Mr. Baker was born in Canandaigua 
county, New York, September 13, 1828, a 
son of Chauncey and Rhoda (Webster) 
Baker. The birth of the father occurred in 
1800, in Vermont, but he was reared in 
New York, of which state his wife was a 
native. In 1835 he removed with his fam- 
ily to Medina county, Ohio, where he worked 
at his trade of blacksmithing and also oper- 



ated a farm, which he purchased when only 
partiallyimproved. Hewas highly respected 
and was called upon to serve in a number 
of local offices of honor and trust. He died 
in Medina county, Ohio, in 1852, and his 
wife departed this life in 1872. In their 
family were five children, two sons and three 
daughters. William Baker, the brother of 
our subject, died in Ohio, at the age of 
thirty- five, leaving a family. The three 
sisters were all married and are living at 
this date (1898). 

Upon the home farm in Medina county 
Edward Baker grew to manhood and during 
his youth was provided with good school 
privileges, attending both the common and 
high schools of that locality. For some 
years he successfully engaged in teaching in 
Ohio during the winter months, while the 
summers were devoted to farm work. On 
coming to Illinois in 1853, he purchased a 
farm near Aurora, in Kane county, but after 
operating it for one season, he sold and 
bought another place in St. Charles town- 
ship, two miles west of the village of that 
name. This farm was partially improved, 
and to its further development and cultiva- 
tion he devoted his time and attention for 
about twenty years, during which time he 
built an addition to his house, erected a 
barn and made many other improvements 
which added greatly to its value and at- 
tractive appearance. Subsequently he sold 
his farm, and removing to St. Charles, he 
formed a business partnership and engaged 
in merchandising, being at the present time 
the oldest merchant in the village. 

In Summit county, Ohio, Mr. Baker was 
married in 1850, the lady of his choice be- 
ing Miss Martha E. Phelps, a nativeof New 
York state, and a daughter of John Phelps, 
who at an early day removed from New 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



York to Ohio. Mrs. Baker was reared and 
educated in Summit county. The children 
born to our subject and his wife are as fol- 
lows: Charles, who died at the age of 
thirteen years; Delora, wife of J. W. Gates, 
of Chicago, who is president of the Illinois 
Steel Company and is largely interested in 
mines in the west; Vernie, wife of R. F. 
Angel, of St. Charles; and Edward J. , a 
grain inspector of Chicago, who is married 
and lives in Chicago. 

Politically, Mr. Baker is a life-long Re- 
publican, an advocate of protection and 
sound money, and has served as alderman in 
St. Charles. He has ever taken an active in- 
terest in educational affairs, has been a lead- 
ing member of the school board for almost a 
quarter of a century, and his labors have 
been very effective in raising the standard 
of schools in St. Charles. Religiously he 
and his wife are active and prominent mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
while he has been a member of its board for 
thirty-five years. He also belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has 
been treasurer of the lodge for the long 
period of twenty years. Over his life record 
there falls no shadow of wrong, and in many 
respects his life is well worthy of emulation, 
for he is an honorable, upright business 
man, and has ever been found true and 
faithful to every trust reposed in him. 



WILLIAM PFRANGLE, city clerk, and 
also town clerk of Aurora, was born 
in this city March 7, 1860, and is the son 
of Sebastian and Lena (Heimelsbach) Pfran- 
gle, both of whom are natives of Germany, 
and were there married. In 1853, the fam- 
ily came to America, first stopping in New 
York for a short time, then coming west to 



Chicago, where they remained about two 
years, moving from there to Wheaton, Illi- 
nois, Mr. Prangle being elected professor of 
German and music in the college at that 
place. He was a highly educated man and 
was engaged in teaching before coming to 
America. From Wheaton they came to 
Aurora in 1858, and he engaged in teaching 
in the old Clark seminary. He died in 1859, 
before the completion of the school build- 
ing, when about forty-three years of age. 
His wife survived him many years, dying in 
1886, at the age of seventy-one years. 

Our subject is the youngest of twelve 
children, born to Professor and Mrs. Pfran- 
gle. Of the twelve, four sisters and three 
brothers are still living, while three died in 
early childhood, and two in mature years. 
The living are Amelia, wife of Conrad Hoff- 
man, residing in Aurora; Emma, wife of 
John Lackner, of Aurora; Charles J., who 
married Laura Wagner, is a sign writer in 
Aurora; Pauline, wife of Zopher Ketchum, 
of Aurora; Albert, janitor of the east side 
high school, Aurora; Jenny, wife of Benja- 
min B. Hayford, chief engineer of the 
Columbus Memorial Building, Chicago; 
and William of this review. 

The subject of this sketch was educated 
in the Aurora public schools, and at the age 
of sixteen secured a position as clerk in the 
postoffice, and for nineteen years was con- 
nected with the postal service, and for fif- 
teen years was assistant postmaster, termi- 
nating his career there May 6, 1895, when 
he resigned, having been elected city clerk, 
which office he still holds and is now serv- 
ing his second term. He was also elected 
town clerk in April, 1895, and is serving 
his third term in that office. 

On the 3rd of May, 1882, Mr. Pfrangle 
was united in marriage with Miss Sadie 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



293 



Cross, daughter of Prof. J. G. Cross, and 
author of the eclectic shorthand system. 
He is a teacher of wide experience, and for 
a time was connected with the college at 
Naperville, the seminary at Aurora, and 
the State Normal School, at Normal, Illi- 
nois. He is now conducting a school in 
Los Angeles, California. He is also a min- 
ister in the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and filled pulpits in the Rock River confer- 
ence before taking up college work. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Pfrangle five children have 
been born Jessie, Bessie, George, Charles 
and Mabel, the latter two being twins. 
They were born February 13, 1893, and 
Mabel died July 4, 1894. 

Mrs. Pfrangle is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and is active in all 
church and benevolent work. Mr. Pfrangle 
is a member of the Uniform Rank of Knights 
of Pythias, and affiliates with the Repub- 
lican party, in state and national campaigns. 
He is a good and accommodating officer, 
and a most worthy citizen, such as give 
character to a community. His official ca- 
reer speaks of the right man in the right 
place, and duty well done, and duty appre- 
ciated. 



GEORGE S. HALEY, the present effi- 
cient police magistrate of Batavia, has 
been a resident of Kane county since 1854. 
He was born in the town of Guilford, Wind- 
ham county, Vermont, July 14, 1827. He 
traces his ancestry to Belcher Haley, a na- 
tive of Ireland, who came to this country 
at a very early day, and located in Wind- 
ham county, Vermont, where his son Nathan 
T. Haley, the father of our subject, was 
born in 1800. In his native county, Nathan 
T. Haley, grew to manhood, and there mar- 



ried Harriet Holton, also a native of Wind- 
ham county, Vermont. He was by occupa- 
tion a farmer and upon his farm in that 
county reared his family and spent his en- 
tire life, dying in 1867. His wife survived 
him a number of years, dying about 1885. 

George S. Haley spent his boyhood upon 
his father's farm, and until the age of six- 
teen attended the public schools as the op- 
portunity was afforded him, usually three 
months during the winter, in the meantime 
working on the farm. He then went to 
Greenfield, Massachusetts, to learn the cut- 
ler's trade, serving an apprenticeship of six 
years, and then worked as a journeyman, 
from 1845 to 1854. With that laudable de- 
sire to better himself, he came west, locat- 
ing at Geneva, Illinois, and there went to 
work as a machinist. . For ten years he was 
thus employed, and in 1864, came to Bata- 
via and entered the machine shop, and has 
since been a resident of the city. For twen- 
ty-five years he was foreman in the foundry 
of the United States Wind and Pump Com- 
pany, and was one its oldest employees. 

In 1847, at Brattleboro, Vermont, Mr. 
Haley was united in marriage to Miss Lu- 
cinda Nash, a daughter of Lewis Nash, by 
whom he has nine children, as follows: 
Charles H., a foreman for the Challenge 
Engine and Feed Mill Company, who is 
married and has a family; Rev. Fred H., 
married and now resides in Kansas City; 
Edward, married, and is a machinist, re- 
siding in Batavia; Clarence H., married, 
and is also a machinist, residing in Batavia; 
Hattie M., wife of Merritt McMaster, a 
blacksmith of Batavia; Dexter Garrett, a 
cabinet maker, who is married and resides 
in Batavia; and Frank E., at home. Two 
died in early childhood. 

Politically Mr. Haley was a Republican 



294 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



for years, and cast his vote for John C. 
Fremont, the presidential candidate of that 
party. He was originally a Whig and cast 
his first presidential vote for Zachary Tay- 
lor. Of late he has been identified with the 
Democratic party. By his fellow citizens, 
he has been honored with several positions 
of honor and trust. He served as village 
trustee and one term as president of the 
board. He is now police magistrate, which 
position he has held for twelve years, with 
credit to himself and constituents. In po- 
litical affairs he has always manifested great 
interest, and has often served as a delegate 
to the various conventions of his party. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Masons 
and has served in every position in the blue 
lodge except Master, and in some of the 
offices of the Chapter. 

In July, 1894, Mrs. Lucinda Haley de- 
parted this life, and on the 24th of Novem- 
ber, 1897, Mr. Haley married Mrs. Caro- 
line Patterson, nee Carter, of Chicago, but 
a native of Ohio. She is a member of the 
Episcopal church, in which she takes a com- 
mendable interest. A resident of Kane 
county for forty-four years, Mr. Haley is 
well known as a man of exemplary habits, 
true to his friends and one who is willing to 
do his duty in all things. 



THOMAS F. RICH, a veteran of the war 
for the union, and for many years a 
substantial farmer in Kane county, is now 
living a retired life in the village of Hamp- 
shire. He was born in the town of Benson, 
Rutland county, Vermont, where he at- 
tended country schools until the age of 
twelve years. In 1836 the family came 
west, leaving Whitehall, Vermont, May 16, 
going by canal to Buffalo, New York, and 



thence by lake to Chicago. On account of 
severe storms, they were required to lay by 
for three days at Manitou Islands. Arriving 
at Chicago, they at once went to Naperville, 
Illinois, where they resided until the follow- 
ing October, when they moved to Deerfield 
precinct, now Rutland township, Kane coun- 
ty, where the father took up three hundred 
acres in the southwest corner of the town- 
ship. 

Elijah Rich, the father, was one of the 
first settlers of Rutland township. He was 
born in Worcester, Massachusetts, June 10, 
1795, and with his parents removed to the 
town of Benson, Rutland county, Vermont, 
in 1810. His father, Elijah Rich, Sr. , was 
a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Elijah 
Rich married Tryphosa Fosvler, a native of 
Vermont and a daughter of Thomas and 
Betsy Fowler. By this union there were 
four children, of whom our subject was sec- 
ond in order of birth. In 1835 the father 
came west, riding all the way from his Ver- 
mont home to Kane county, Illinois, on 
horseback. Being favorably impressed with 
the country he returned home and, as already 
stated, brought out his family in 1836. 
Here his last days were spent, and he died 
full of years, while honored and respected 
by all. 

The subject of this sketch remained at 
home until nineteen years of age, when he 
ran away and lived with the Indians for a 
time. He then went to Chicago, where he 
worked one year, going from thence to Ga- 
lena, Illinois, where for three years he found 
employment in the lead mines. Attracted 
by the glitter of a traveling circus, he joined 
it, and remained with it for six months. 
The life was a hard one and he was well 
pleased to break his connection with it. 
For two summers he was on the Mississippi 




THOMAS F. RICH. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



297 



river, running on the steamer, Amaranth, 
plying between St. Peters, Minnesota, and 
St. Louis. The greater part of the time, 
however, the boat ran no farther north 
than Galena. 

Having enough of a roving life, he re- 
turned to Kane county and purchased one 
hundred and twenty acres in section 20, Rut- 
land township, which had been partially im- 
proved, having on it a log house and log 
stable. He at once went to work and in 
due time had one of the most productive 
farms in the township, and all improve- 
ments were in keeping with the time. He 
there remained until 1891, when he sold 
the place and removed to the village of 
Hampshire, where he owns a good dwelling 
and also a store building on Main street. 
Mr. Rich has been twice married, his first 
union being with Miss Priscilla Noakes, who 
was born April 14, 1823, on the ocean, 
while her parents were emigrating to Amer- 
ica from England. She was a daughter of 
Thomas and Mary Noakes. This wedding 
ceremony was celebrated in Rutland town- 
ship in 1850, and by this union were four 
children as follows: Albert, who lives in 
Dundee; Anise, who married Henry Stevens, 
and now lives at Molino, Florida; Mary, 
who died at the age of four years; and Alan- 
son, who lives in Nebraska. Mrs. Priscilla 
Rich dying December 3, 1876, Mr. Rich 
was again married, March 3, 1880, his second 
union being with Miss Mary Welsh, born in 
Lewisburg, Virginia, and a daughter of Will- 
iam and Catherine (Schaver) Welsh. By 
this second union, one daughter was born, 
Ada, who resides at home. 

When the South rebelled, and endeav- 
ered by force of arms to dismember the 
union, Mr. Rich showed his patriotism by 
enlisting in the Eighth Illinois Calvary, 

14 



serving from September 18, 1861, until 
September, 1864, when he was honorably 
discharged. He was in the first battle of 
Bull Run, was at Seven Pines, Whitehouse 
Landing, Mechanicsville, and in all sixty 
regular battles. His interest in war mat- 
ters has been maintained and he is now a 
member of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, while his wife is a member of the Relief 
Corps. In politics he is a Republican. 



H. WOODRUFF is one of the 
old and honored citizens of Elgin, his 
home being at No. .306 Chicago street. A 
native of Massachusetts, he was born Feb- 
ruary 15, 1819, in the "f own of West Stock- 
bridge, Berkshire county, and is a son of 
Henry and Belinda (Benedict) Woodruff, 
also natives of that state. His paternal 
grandfather, Asaph Woodruff, was a soldier 
of the Revolutionary war, serving under 
Captain Reddington, olRichmond, and Colo- 
nel Williams and Benedict Arnold. In 
November, 1775, he went with his regiment 
to Canada, under command of General 
Montgomery, and after the capture of St. 
Johns and Montcalm, they joined Arnold's 
forces at Quebec. The siege at that place 
lasted until December 31, during which 
Montgomery was killed. The troops then 
fell back, spending a miserable winter in 
fortifications of snow, where they were 
without food for three days, and at any time 
the soldiers could be tracked by bloody foot- 
prints. Mr. Woodruff re-enlisted July 17, 
1777, but the same month was discharged 
and transferred to another company. He 
never received a pension, as when the army 
was finally discharged and paid off, he and 
some of his comrades were taking home 
some sick soldiers. He died in 1833, at 



298 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



about the age of ninety years, and his last 
wife, Ruth (Stone) Woodruff, died a few 
years later at a ripe old age. 

Henry Woodruff, our subject's father, 
was born in 1794, and was a soldier of the 
war of 1812, being a member of an artillery 
company stationed at Boston. He died be- 
fore pensions were issued for that war. He 
was a practical surveyor, and also engaged 
in farming and the manufacture of lime and 
brick. One night while sawing marble in a 
mill, he became entangled in the gearing 
about nine p. m., and being all alone he 
was unable to make any one hear his cries 
for help, no one coming to his relief until 
about six o'clock the next morning. After 
twenty-four hours of terrible suffering, he 
passed away, in 1826. He was one of a 
large family of children, of whom Gilbert 
Woodruff is still living at the age of eighty- 
eight years, being the oldest man in the sec- 
tion of North Carolina where he makes 
his home. For the past twenty years he 
has been the only survivor of the family. 
The mother of our subject, who was a 
daughter of John and Betsy Benedict, died 
in 1832, in the faith of the Presbyterian 
Church, of which she was a consistent mem- 
ber. Cyrus H. is the oldest of the four 
children and is the only one now living. 
John B., an attorney, died at the age of 
twenty-six years; Harriet B. died in 1831, 
at the age of eleven ; and Lewis T. died at 
the age of twenty-three. All were residents 
of West Stockbridge, Massachusetts. John 
B. was a graduate of Union College, New 
York. 

Mr. Woodruff, of this review, began his 
education in the schools of West Stock- 
bridge, and later attended an academy at 
Canaan, New York. He was reared on a 
farm, and before attaining his majority he 



engaged in teaching for three winters. He 
then embarked in the hardware business in 
Stockbridge, meeting with fair success in 
this undertaking. A few years later he be- 
came a partner in a blast furnace at \Vest 
Stockbridge, with which he was connected 
until coming west in 1856. In partnership 
with another gentleman, he engaged in the 
hardware business in Lena, Illinois, until 
1862, when he removed to Dundee, Kane 
county, organizing the Illinois Iron & Bolt 
Company, of which he was secretary and 
treasurer for three years. Since 1868 he 
has made his home in Elgin, where he was 
engaged in the foundry business for six 
years, being forced to retire at the end of 
that time on account of rheumatism. Since 
then he has engaged in no active business. 

On the 1 9th of March, 1840, Mr. Wood- 
ruff was united in marriage with Miss Louisa 
Sprague, of Austerlitz, New York, a daugh- 
ter of Heman and Anna Sprague. Of their 
five children, Mary Ann died at the age of 
nine years, Harriet B. , at the age of five 
years, and Emma Isabel, at the age of ten 
months. Ida Louise is the wife of W. Eu- 
gene Bosworth, a merchant of Elgin, and 
they have five children Cyrus I., who 
graduates from Yale College with the class 
of 1898; Charles E., who died in 1885, at 
the age of nine years; Ralph Roy, Ethel M. 
and Walter Henry. Charles Henry, the 
youngest child of our subject, married 
Marian Eaton and has two children Wilda 
E. and Rosella. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodruff, their son, 
daughter and son-in-law are all members of 
the Baptist church, in which the last named 
is serving as deacon. Since attaining his 
majority in 1840, Mr. Woodruff has been 
identified with the Democratic party, and 
since 1856 he has affiliated with the Mason- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



299 



ic order. While a resident of Massachus- 
etts, he took quite an active and prominent 
part in political affairs, and in 1849 and 
1853 was elected to the state legislature, 
serving .for two terms with credit to himself 
and to the satisfaction of his constituents. 
Among his colleagues were several noted 
men, including George S. Boutwell, Gen. 
N. P. Banks, Benjamin Butler, Amasa 
Walker and H. L. Dawes. After coming 
west his business interests occupied his en- 
tire attention, leaving no time to devote to 
political affairs. He never acts except from 
honest motives and in all his varied relations 
in business affairs and in social life, he has 
maintained a character and standing that 
has impressed all with his sincere and man- 
ly purpose to do by others as he would have 
others do by him. 



JOHN McKELLAR, who resides on a 
farm on section 20, Plato township, was 
born at Plato Corners January u, 1857. 
His grandfather, Archibald McKellar, was a 
native of Argyleshire, Scotland, born Janu- 
ary 12, 1777, and there died February 25, 
1864, at the age of eighty-six years. He 
was by occupation a farmer and fisherman, 
and married Mary McGregor, a descendant 
of Rob Roy, the Scottish chieftain. 

Daniel McKellar, the father of our sub- 
ject, was born in a fishing boat in Argyle- 
shire, forty miles from Glasgow, June 12, 
1813, and died March 16, 1889. He lived 
on the farm and followed fishing with his 
father. Their old stone house on the Clyde 
is yet visible from passing boats. When a 
young man he and his brother Duncan 
opened a store on one of the islands, and 
there secured a good trade. His brother 
had served with the Scotch Greys in the 



British army. During a short visit to his 
home on the mainland his brother died, and 
the widow in a very short time disposed of 
everything and sailed for America. 

In 1836 Daniel McKellar, in company 
with his cousin, Colin McKellar, came to 
America, sailing from Greenock, Scotland. 
He lived ten years at Dryden Corners, 
Tompkins county, New York, where he 
rented land and engaged in farming. In 
1837 his parents also came to this country, 
and later his brother, Hugh McKellar, came. 
In 1846 the family came to Kane county, 
Illinois, lived one year in Elgin township, 
and then Daniel and his father bought one 
hundred and sixty acres of land west of 
Plato Corners, to which he subsequently 
added twenty-five acres more. Daniel Mc- 
Kellar lived at Plato Corners from 1853 
until his death in 1889. 

On the 4th of July, 1850, Daniel Mc- 
Kellar married Miss Emily Sovereign, born 
at Simcoe, Canada, August 3, 1827. She 
lived at Simcoe and in New York state until 
she came west, in October, 1845. She is 
the daughter of Richard Sovereign, a native 
of New Jersey, who died about 1866, at the 
age of seventy-three years. He was a car- 
penter and builder by trade, but purchased 
eighty acres in Plato township, and there 
engaged in farming. His father, Henry 
Sovereign, also a native of New Jersey, died 
at Ludlow, New York. Richard Sovereign 
married Elizabeth Plummer, daughter of 
George and Hannah (Murtrie) Plummer. 
To Daniel and Emily McKellar eleven chil- 
dren were born, as follows: Richard, who 
died at the age of twelve years; Jennie, wife 
of John Sherwood; Archibald, who died at 
the age of thirty-seven; John, our subject; 
Mary, who married Thomas Dadswell; Ana- 
belle, who married Robert Shedden; Ruby, 



300 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



wife of Arthur Durrant; Richard married 
Lydia Wright, and lives in Elgin; Daniel, 
who died at the age of fifteen months; James 
Gregor lives at home with his mother; and 
Benjamin, who died in infancy. 

John McKellar, our subject, remained at 
home with his father until his marriage, 
when he began farming for himself. He 
was married in Plato township February 
12, 1884, to Miss Minnie Sherwood, a 
daughter of Seth Sherwood, a native of 
New York, who came west in 1846 with his 
father's family. Seth Sherwood was the 
son of John and Sarah (Pease) Sherwood, 
the former a native of Virginia, who lived 
some years in New York, served in the war 
of 1812, and later emigrated to Kane county, 
where he died at the age of seventy- four 
years. Of the eight children born to Seth 
Sherwood and wife, Mrs. McKellar is the 
youngest. 

Mr. McKellar owns a fine farm of one 
hundred and forty acres, while Mrs. McKel- 
lar is the owner of one hundred and sixty 
acres in several tracts, but all lying in Pla- 
to township. Mr. McKellar devotes his 
time to general farming, making a specialty 
of raising and fattening cattle for the mar- 
ket. In politics he is an uncompromising 
Republican, taking great interest in political 
affairs, and has served as a member of the 
county executive committee of his party. 
He has been honored by his friends and 
neighbors with a number of local township 
offices. 



/CHARLES W. SUHR, who is operating 
v> a fine farm on section 7, Hampshire 
township, was born in Belvidere, Illinois, 
November 26, 1867. His father, Joseph 
C. Suhr, was born in the village of Lang- 



felden, Pomerania, Germany, August 30, 
1837, and was the son of Joseph Suhr, also 
a native of the same country. The father 
was reared to farm life, and received a good 
education in his native land. In 1867 he 
sailed from Hamburg on the sailing vessel 
Liverance, and after a voyage of seven 
weeks and three days landed at New Yo,rk, 
November 12, 1867. From there he came 
direct to Belvidere, Illinois, where he lived 
for nine years, working at odd jobs, but 
the greater part of the time on farms. In 
1876 he came to Hampshire township, Kane 
county, Illinois, rented a farm, and in eight 
years saved enough to make his first pur- 
chase of land, which is comprised in the 
farm now occupied by our subject. He was 
married in Pensingen, Pomerania, in Oc- 
tober, 1866, to Lena Grawe, born in 
Sophienhove, Pomerania, November i , 1 840, 
and the daughter of Johakeim and Lena 
Grawe. Johakeim Grawe was the son of 
John Grawe, and all passed their days in 
Pomerania. By this union were four chil- 
dren, as follows: Carrie, who married 
Charles Terwillinger, of Hampshire town- 
ship, and now resides in California; Will- 
iam, a plasterer by trade, living in Chicago; 
Charles W., our subject; and Bertha, wife 
of Robert Leitner, a prosperous business 
man of Elgin. Religiously Joseph C. Suhr 
was a member of the Lutheran church, and 
fraternally a member of the Odd Fellows. 
His death occurred August 23, 1894, on 
his farm on section 7, Hampshire township. 
The subject of this sketch received his 
education in the district schools, beginning 
in Belvidere and ending in Hampshire town- 
ship. He attended school during the winter 
season until eighteen years of age. He re- 
mained at home assisting his father until 
the latter's death, when he took charge of 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



301 



the farm for his mother, and in 1896 rented 
the place. In 1 896 he married Miss Carrie 
Leitner, a sister of Robert Leitner, and a 
daughter of John George Leitner, a success- 
ful farmer residing in Hampshire township, 
but who was born in Katolzburg, Bavaria, 
March 15, 1834, and who learned the trade 
of a weaver from his father, who lived on a 
small farm. Mr. Leitner came to America 
in June, 1852, sailing from Bremen on the 
Swedish sailing vessel Richard Anderson, 
which had three hundred and ten passengers 
and were fifty-four days in making the voy- 
age. Landing at New York, Mr. Leitner 
there worked some two years, then came 
west to Kane county, Illinois, and worked 
for thirteen dollars a month at farm labor 
for several years. He bought his first eighty 
acres of land in 1861, to which he has since 
added sixty acres, making one hundred and 
forty acres in all. His father, Leonard 
Leitner, was a weaver by trade, and died 
in Germany at the age of seventy-seven 
years. His mother, Sophia (Rupp) Leitner, 
also died in Germany, which was her native 
'country. John G. Leitner married Sophia 
Wiedmeyer, born in Marck, Gronegin, Ger- 
many, September 20, 1842, and they at 
once came to America. They were the par- 
ents of fifteen children, of whom Caroline, 
wife of our subject, is eighth in order of 
birth. To our subject and wife one son has 
been born, Edwin. 

The farm on which our subject resides 
consists of one hundred and seventy acres 
of fine prairie land, large dwelling house 
and barns, built by his father. Here he 
carries on general and dairy farming, usually 
milking about twenty-five head of cows, 
the products of which he ships to Chicago. 
In politics Mr. Suhr is an independent Dem- 
ocrat, and religiously he and his wife are 



members of the Evangelical church. Fra- 
ternally he is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen 
of America, and Court of Honor. He is a 
progressive young farmer, genial and popu- 
lar with all his acquaintances. 



/CAPTAIN JOHN F. ELLIOTT, an hon- 
^.s ored veteran of the Civil war, who has 
for over forty years been prominently iden- 
tified with the interests of St. Charles, was 
born September 9, 1834, near Meadville, 
Crawford county, Pennsylvania. His fa- 
ther, Thomas Elliott, was a native of Ire- 
land, born in 1811, and when a lad of four- 
teen years accompanied his brother on his 
emigration to the new world, first locating 
in I he city of New York, where he was 
mostly educated. For some years he en- 
gaged in merchandising there and for two 
years he was interested in a manufacturing 
enterprise in Buffalo, New York. Subse- 
quently he bought a farm in Crawford coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, which he operated for 
some years, and then removed to Erie 
county, New York, residing there until 1852, 
when he came to Illinois, spending the .last 
years of his life in St. Charles, an honored 
and highly respected citizen. 

In New York city, Thomas Elliott 
wedded Mary Farrell, who died in March, 
1893, having survived him several years, his 
death having occurred in 1881. While liv- 
ing in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, he 
had served as deputy sheriff for some time. 
In the family of this worthy couple were 
five sons and two daughters who reached 
years of maturity. Mary A., the eldest, 
died in childhood; John F. is next in order 
of birth; Charles is engaged in business in 
Chicago; George C. is a farmer residing at 



302 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Seattle, Washington; Theressa and James 
K. both died unmarried; Henry C. married 
and settled at Blue Island, Cook county, 
Illinois, but died at St. Charles, and Lucy 
died at the age of seventeen years. 

John F. Elliott spent his boyhood and 
youth in Pennsylvania and New York, and 
received very limited school privileges, being 
almost wholly self-educated. On the fifth 
of December, 1855, he became a resident 
of St. Charles, and having previously 
learned the mason's trade, he worked at 
that occupation in both Aurora and Chicago 
for about twenty years, being employed on 
many of the early buildings and bridges in 
this section of the state. 

Feeling that his country needed his serv- 
ices during the dark days of the Rebellion, 
Mr. Elliott enlisted August 12, 1861, in 
Company K, Thirty-sixth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry the Fox River Regiment which 
was raised at Wayne, Illinois, and he was 
soon afterward appointed first sergeant, 
serving as such fourteen months. . For faith- 
ful service on the field and on the march 
after the battle of Corinth, he was promoted 
first lieutenant, and was subsequently com- 
missioned captain. He participated in the 
engagement at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, the 
siege of Corinth, and the battles of Perry- 
ville, Kentucky, and 'Stone River, Tennes- 
see. At the last named he was taken pris- 
oner with forty- two others of his regiment, 
including seven officers, and was sent to 
Atlanta, where the officers were confined 
until February 26, 1863, when they were 
ordered to march to Libby prison, Rich- 
mond. While en route Mr. Elliott made 
his escape from the train at Conyers, Geor- 
gia, and after traveling a distance of five 
hundred miles through the rebel country, 
reached the Union lines, joining the troops 



at Corinth, Mississippi, March 26, 1863. 
Later he rejoined his own regiment at Mur- 
freesboro, Tennessee. On the 1 8th of May 
following, through the kindness of General 
Phil Sheridan, he was detailed for recruit- 
ing service in Illinois, and returned to 
Springfield, where he received his orders. 
He then opened a recruiting office in St. 
Charles, but was afterward ordered to re- 
port at Springfield, and in September, 1863, 
was placed in charge of Camp Yates, where 
he remained from the I4th of that month 
until March 28, 1864, during which time 
nineteen thousand, eight hundred recruits 
were received and transferred to their regi- 
ments. He had received only one order 
for correction from the auditing department 
at Washington. After making his final re- 
port, he was placed in charge of the camp 
of veteran corps, remaining there until he 
resigned the commission, on June 4, 1864. 

For a few years after his return home, 
Captain Elliott worked at his trade in Chi- 
cago and Kane county. At St. Charles he was 
married September 6, 1860, to Miss Sarah 
Clark, a native of Birmingham, England, 
who came to the United States when a child 
of eight years, and was reared and educated 
in St. Charles. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott have 
three sons living, namely: Charles E., now 
a carpenter and joiner of San Francisco, 
California; Ulysses S., also a carpenter and 
joiner, who is married and resides in St. 
Charles; and John J., at home with his par- 
ents. They have also lost three children: 
May and Nellie, who both died at the age 
of fourteen months; and Nettie, who was a 
successful teacher in St. Charles, and died 
in early womanhood. 

The parents are both active members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
Mr. Elliott is now a trustee, and has been 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



303 



a member of the official board for some 
years. He is a prominent member of the 
Elon J. Farnsworth post, No. 456, G. A. R. , 
was its first commander and served in that 
capacity two or three terms. He is now 
officer of the day. Politically he is a life- 
long Republican, casting his first presiden- 
tial vote for John C. Fremont in 1856, and 
four years later supported Abraham Lin- 
coln. He has always taken an active and 
prominent part in local affairs, was alder- 
man of St. Charles for ten years, and for 
the long period of 'twenty-one years was a 
most efficient and faithful member of the 
school board. In 1876 he was elected 
justice of the peace, and with the exception 
of two years has since served in that capac- 
ity, being at the present time the oldest 
justice of the peace in point of service in 
Kane county. He is also filling the office 
of police magistrate, and is recognized as 
one of the most valued and useful citizens 
of St. Charles. He is a man of sterling 
worth in all the relations of life, and his 
name is honorably and inseparably con- 
nected with the history of his adopted city. 



/CHARLES A. STONE is a representa- 
^> tive one of the earliest pioneers of 
Kane county. His father, Isaac Stone, was 
born in Orford, Grafton county, New 
Hampshire, January i, 1811, where he 
lived until attaining his majority. In 1833, 
he moved to White Pigeon, Michigan, and 
in the spring of 1834, came to Kane county, 
when there was but one house in Elgin, 
that of James T. Gifford, and it was not 
finished. He hewed and hauled logs to 
build the first log house on the west side for 
Jonathan Kimball, which served as resi- 
dence, hotel and justice's office. In that 



house Mr. Stone and Mr. Kimball kept 
" bach " until the arrival of Mrs. Phinneas 
Kimball. In the summer of 1835, Mr. Stone 
made claim to two hundred and forty-six 
acres which now comprises the farm of our 
subject. He married Abigail Knapp, born 
at Homer, New York, about 1820. She is 
the daughter of James Knapp, of Homer, 
New York, who died when about eighty 
years of age. He married Abigail May, born 
in Hartford, Connecticut, and daughter of 
Eleazer May. She died at the age of fifty- 
two years. The grandfather of Mrs. Isaac 
Stone fought through the Revolutionary 
war, and while on the way home was killed 
by the Indians within sight of his house. 
Isaac and Abigail Stone had four children, 
two of whom are living Elvena, now Mrs. 
S. W. Chapman and Charles A., our sub- 
ject. The mother is yet living and makes 
her home with Mr. Chapman in Elgin. 

Charles A. Stone, our subject, was born 
on the farm where he now resides, April 4, 
1856. He attended the public schools of 
Elgin township, and completed his educa- 
tion in the Elgin Academy. He remained 
at home, assisting his father in the cultiva- 
tion of the farm until the latter's death, 
which occurred January 14, 1881, since 
which time he has been in charge of the 
place. For years he has made a specialty 
of stock raising, principally horses, and has 
charge of many driving horses through the 
winter, caring for them until spring. The 
farm is well-improved and in front of his 
residence is a fine lawn shaded by oak trees 
of unusual size. 

Mr. Stone was married in Clinton, Iowa, 
December 28, 1880, to Miss Emma E. 
Fletcher, born in Plato township, and 
daughter of Lewis and Lydia (Griste) 
Fletcher, the former a native of England 



304 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECC: 



and the latter of Pennsylvania. They were 
the parents of three children Emma E. , 
now Mrs. Stone; Albert and Henry, whc 
reside in Elgin. To Mr. and Mrs. Stone 
five children have been born: Fred, born 
October 22, 1881; Leon, December 19, 
1882; Ray, August 18, 1883; Isla, Novem- 
ber 20, 1888; and Vernette, November 25, 
1890. 

In politics Mr. Stone is a Democrat and 
a firm believer in free silver. The only of- 
fice that he has held has been that of school 
director. As a farmer he ranks among the 
best in Elgin township, and as a citizen he 
is held in the highest esteem. 



ASA ROSENCRANS, deceased, was one 
of the representative and honored pio- 
neers of Kane county, with whose early de- 
velopment and prosperity he and his family 
were prominently identified. The family is 
of Danish extraction, being founded in this 
country by two brothers who came from 
Amsterdam, and the name was formerly 
spelled Rosenkrans. Representatives of 
the family have figured largely in American 
history, one of whom was General Rosen- 
crans, of the Civil war. 

Col. John Rosencrans, our subject's 
grandfather, was a famous Indian fighter, 
and commanded a regiment during the 
French and Indian war from 1755 until 
1762. In 1777 he was made a colonel in 
the war of the Revolution. Filled with the 
spirit of adventure, he did much toward 
opening up new country to civilization. He 
was born in 1724 and was married in 1751 
to Miss Margaret De Witt. Their second 
oldest child, John Rosencrans, was a native 
of New Jersey, and was a farmer by occu- 
pation. The first of the family, who also 



bore the name of John, died in infancy. 
These were followed by Jacob; Arrantie, 
who died in infancy; Arrantie, married 
Abraham Van Coopen; Alexander, born in 
1759, married Mary Mortman; Catherine, 
born in 1761, who first married a Mr. 
Woodard, and, after 'his death, wedded 
John Pelton; Charrick De Witt, born in 
1764, who married Sarah Pelton; Dr. Eli- 
jah, born in 1766, who married Cornelia 
Suffern; Levi, born in 1770, who married 
Polly Hankinson; Benjamin, who was a 
twin brother of Levi, and married Margaret 
Schoonover; Simon, who died in infancy; 
Dr. Simon, who married Sarah Schoonover; 
and Polly, who was born in 1777 and died 
unmarried. 

Of this family John Rosencrans was the 
father of our subject. He married Eliza- 
beth Van Nest, and they made their home 
upon a farm in New Jersey, which was aft- 
erward purchased by their son Asa, with 
whom they lived until called to their final 
rest. In order of birth their children were 
as follows: Isaac, Asa, Elijah, Dr. Char- 
rick; Lucy, who married John Dennis, and 
during her widowhood came from New 
York to Elgin, Illinois, where she died dur- 
ing the "505; Catherine, who died unmar- 
ried, in 1827; and Garret, a farmer by oc- 
cupation, who removed from New Jersey to 
Wisconsin, where his death occurred. All 
are now deceased. 

Asa Rosencrans was born in Sussex 
county, New Jersey, in 1785, and on reach- 
ing manhood he married Miss Jane Cole, 
also a native of that county, born December 
I, 1789, where their children were all born 
excepting the youngest Mrs. J. R. Hawes 
whose birth occurred in New York. On 
leaving his native state, Mr. Rosencrans re- 
moved to Steuben county, New York, and 




GARRETT ROSENCRANS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



307 



in the autumn of 1836 sent his two oldest 
sons, Horace and Frazier, to Illinois to pur- 
chase a farm. They were very fortunate 
in their selection of land, choosing a tract 
about two and one-half miles from the pres- 
ent public square in Elgin. The following 
year the family located here, and with the 
interests of Kane county some of its mem- 
bers have since been identified. In this 
state Mr. Rosencrans followed farming, but 
in New Jersey he had worked at the carpen- 
ter trade. He was very handy with tools, 
did considerable cabinet work, and some of 
the bureaus and other articles of furniture 
which he manufactured are still in posses- 
sion of the family, prized as precious heir- 
looms. He died October 30, 1884, and his 
wife passed away January 18, 1877. For 
thirty years her health was very poor, but 
her mind was very active, and she was very 
devoted to her family. She and her hus- 
band were among the first members of the 
Congregational church of Elgin, always took 
an active and prominent part in its work, 
and will long be remembered for their 
countless acts of kindness and hospitality, 
so characteristic of the pipneer settlers. 
She was a woman of deep piety and great 
strength of character. 

In the family of this worthy couple were 
the following named children: (i) Horace, 
born in New jersey November 15, 1810, 
married Maria Ingersol, and had nine chil- 
dren, of whom four died in infancy. The 
others are Horace Edgar, a resident of 
Marengo, Illinois; Louisa, wife of D. Hen- 
derson, a carpenter; Mrs. Sarah Ann Eggle- 
ston, of Iowa; and Mrs. Deborah Wood- 
ward. The father of these children died in 
'893. aged eighty-three years. (2) Frazier, 
born in 1813, came with his brother Horace 
to Illinois in 1836. Two years later, with 



his brothers, he was bathing in the Fox river 
above where the shoe factory is now located, 
and one of the younger brothers went be- 
yond his 'depth. Being unable to swim, 
Frazier went to his assistance and succeeded 
in rescuing him, but was himself taken with 
a cramp and sank to rise no more. His 
untimely death, by such a heroic deed, cast 
a pall of gloom not only over .the happy 
family, but over the entire neighborhood, 
for he was a great favorite among the early 
settlers, and made friends of all with whom 
he Cctme.. in c&iUact. (3) Maria, who was 
born December 26, 1815, died in the early 
'503. She first married James H. Scott, 
and after his death wedded Jerome B. Smith, 
by whom she had three children Helen, 
Arthur and Alfred all now deceased. By 
her first marriage she also had three children 
Harriet, Fannie and John Frazier Scott. 
The last named is the only one now living, 
his home being in Pittsfield, Illinois. He 
married Mary Pike and has three children: 
John, an attorney of Chicago; Daniel, a 
dentist of that city; and Fannie E. , who 
now makes her home with Mrs. Hawes in 
Elgin. (4) Dr. Halsey Rosencrans was edu- 
cated for the medical profession in Chicago 
under Dr. Brainard, first practiced in Lake 
Zurick, Wisconsin, for a short time, and 
then went to Port Lavaca, Texas. His first 
wife was Anna Eliza Hale, daughter of Dr. 
Hale, of Dundee. By this union there were 
three children: Fannie, Lizzie and Cora. 
For his second wife he married Miss Cynthia 
E. Bowen September 1 1, 1873. (5) Garrett, 
mentioned below. (6) Elizabeth, born in 
December, 1823, was her mother's constant 
companion for many years. She died in 
1892. (7) Catherine, born November 19, 
1826, died at the age of twenty-one years. 
(8) Hiram, born April 29, 1828, is living 



308 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



near Mount Carmel in Southern Utah. (9) 
Jennie, widow of Moses W. Hawes. 

Garrett Rosencrans, fifth in order of birth, 
was born in New Jersey April i, 1821, 
where his boyhood was passed. In the 
primitive schools of that period he received 
his elementary education, and at the age of 
sixteen accompanied his parents on their 
removal to Illinois, where they settled in 
Kane county. Here he assisted in the work 
of the farm until his removal to Elgin. 
Politically an ardent Republican, he could 
never be prevailed upon to accept office, 
with the exception of that of assessor, which 
he filled with credit for many years. He 
was also engaged in surveying. He died in 
Elgin September i o, 1891. Garrett Rosen- 
crans was one of the well known citizens of 
Elgin, and was actively identified with every 
enterprise calculated to develop and foster 
the growth of his adopted city. By his up- 
right and honorable career he won the respect 
of all. 



WILLIAM W. SHERWIN. There are 
few men in Elgin in the past quarter 
of a century who have done more for its 
commercial interests and its growth and de- 
velopment than the man whose name heads 
this review. Without vain display he has 
moved on the even tenor of his way, and 
yet left his mark on almost everything that 
has served to make the city of his adoption 
take front rank among its sister cities of 
northern Illinois. 

Albert Sherwin, father of our subject, 
who is now a leading business man of Lead- 
ville, Colorado, is a native of Vermont, born 
February 23, 1828, and is a son of Timothy 
Sherwin, also a native of Vermont. He 
married Louise Davis, born in Vermont, and 



a daughter of John and Susan (Billings) 
Davis, both of the same state. By this 
union were four children, as follows: Will- 
iam W. and Carrie, twins, the latter dying 
in childhood; Albert E. , who is with his 
father in Leadville, and Susan B. , also at 
Leadville. 

In 1852 Albert Sherwin came west, first 
locating in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he 
was engaged in railroad building. From 
there he moved to Madison, in the same 
state, where he lived several years. Mrs. 
Sherwin departed this life in 1865, and he 
later married Miss Frances M.. Lang, by 
whom he had one son, Fred L. , now with 
his parents in Leadville. In 1868, Mr. 
Sherwin came with his family to Elgin, and 
engaged in the manufacture of butter and 
cheese, which business he carried on for ten 
years, when he sold out and transferred his 
business operations to Leadville, Colorado, 
where he has devoted his energies to min- 
ing, smelting and banking, in which he has 
been successful. He is a man of fine char- 
acter and sound business principles. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

The subject of this sketch spent a part 
of his boyhood days in Madison, Wisconsin, 
and was about thirteen years of age when 
his parents settled in Elgin. After attend- 
ing the district schools for a short time he 
was sent to the Academy. In 1871 he en- 
tered the University of Michigan, at Ann 
Arbor, but did not complete the course of 
study. In 1875, when in the senior class, 
he gave up his studies and returned home 
to enter upon a business career. 

Forming a partnership with D. E Wood 
in 1880, under the firm name of Wood & 
Sherwin, he commenced the manufacture of 
butter and cheese. This continued until 
1890, when he purchased his partner's in- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



309 



terest, and has since conducted the business 
alone. In 1887 he was one of the organ- 
izers of the Creamery Package Manufactur- 
ing Company, of which he has since been 
secretary, and also one of its directors. 

Mr. Sherwin is a member of the Board 
of Trade of Elgin, and has been its treasurer 
for a number of years. In 1887 he organ- 
ized the Elgin Milkine Company, which is 
also incorporated, and of which he is presi- 
dent. This product will in due time add to 
the reputation of Elgin, and will be one of 
the most popular articles for the table. 
Aside from all these interests, he is the 
holder of considerable realty in his adopted 
city. 

On the 28th of April, 1880, Mr. Sher- 
win was united in marriage with Miss Carrie 
M. Town, who was born in Elgin, a daugh- 
ter of Morris Clinton Town, whose sketch 
appears elsewhere in this work. They 
reside in a beautiful home, No. 80 South 
State street, Elgin, the abode of hospitality. 
Politically, Mr. Sherwin is a Republican. 
Fraternally he is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, a member of Monitor lodge, No. 
522, F. & A. M. ; Loyal L. Munn chapter, 
No. 96, R. A. M.; Bethel commandery, No. 
36, K. T. , all of Elgin, and the Consistory 
of Chicago. Socially he takes an active in- 
terest in, and is a member of, the Century 
Club of Elgin, the Lake Side Park Club, of 
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin; the Chicago 
Athletic Club and the University Club of 
Chicago. With his wife he attends the 
Congregational Church of Elgin. 



T HERON J. POTTER, of Aurora, Illi- 
nois, is a native of the great Empire 
state, which has sent many of its best citi- 
zens to Illinois, and who have done their 



full share in making it occupy its present 
proud position as the third state of the Un- 
ion. The family are of English descent, 
some of the ancestors of our subject locat- 
ing in New England at a very early day, the 
grandfather, Silas Potter, moving to Dutch- 
ess county, where his son, James Potter, was 
born in 1798. In his native county James 
Potter married Margaret Thorne, also a na- 
tive of that county. By occupation he was 
a farmer, in which he continued during his 
entire life. In 1853 he came to Illinois, 
settled first in Kane county, where he re- 
sided a few years and then moved to De- 
Kalb county, where he spent the last years 
of his life, dying in 1862. His wife sur- 
vived him a number of years, dying in 1880. 
They were the parents of five sons and one 
daughter, who grew to mature years. The 
oldest, Silas, married, moved west, spent 
his last years in Aurora, living a retired life, 
and where his death occurred; Fannie, who 
is the widow of Lucian Burr, resides in De- 
Kalb county; William first settled in Kane 
county and later moved to De Kalb county, 
where his death occurred; Theron J., of 
this review; Isaac, a business man of Water- 
man, Illinois; and Seneca, who is living re- 
tired in De Kalb, Illinois. 

Theron J. Potter was born in Dutchess 
county, New York, April 3, 1829. Upon 
the home farm in his native state he grew 
to manhood, and as the opportunity was 
afforded him attended the common schools 
during the winter months. On attaining 
his majority he left the parental roof, came 
west and joined his brother, Silas, in Kane 
county. Here he was married, September 
n, 1851, to Miss Ellen Graves, a daughter 
of D. T. Graves, a minister of the Baptist 
church, who was a native of Vermont, but 
in New York married Electa Babcock, a 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



daughter of Samuel Babcock, who was a 
colonel in the Revolutionary war. With 
his family Rev. Graves came west in 1838, 
settling in Warrensville, Du Page county, 
Illinois, from which place he moved to 
Aurora in the fall of 1845. He was an ear- 
nest and active minister of the Gospel, and 
continued in the ministry until his death in 
1851. His wife survived him many years, 
passing away in 1893, at the age of eighty- 
six years. The)' were laid to rest in the 
West side cemetery. Mrs. Potter is one of 
their family of four daughters. Iwanona J. , 
widow of Richard Breese, resides in Aurora; 
Ellen, wife of our subject; Mrs. Eliza Free- 
man, a widow, of Aurora; and Emma, wife 
of Theodore Howard, of Aurora. 

On coming to Aurora, Rev. Graves pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred acres lying 
near the city. After their marriage, Mr. 
and Mrs. Potter began their domestic life 
on that farm, where they resided some 
three or four years. They then moved to 
De Kalb county, where Mr. Potter pur- 
chased a farm which he operated two 
\ears, when he sold out and returned to the 
old Graves homestead, having purchased 
the interests of the heirs. He at once be- 
gan its improvement, and in due time built 
a large, neat residence, barn and other out- 
buildings, making of it one of the most de- 
sirable farms in the township. He contin- 
ued to work the farm until 1883, when he 
removed to Aurora, but soon after pur- 
chased a farm lying partly in Kendall coun- 
ty, and partly in Sugar Grove township, 
Kane county, which he operated some 
three or four years. In 1889 he purchased 
residence property in Aurora, and has 
since been living a retired life. Mr. and 
Mrs. Potter have reared three children, of 
whom Fannie is the wife of Lewis Paull, a 



stockdealer of Aurora; Arthur J., married 
and in business in Aurora; and Minnie E., 
wife of Arthur Winteringham, representing 
the Covenant Mutual Insurance Company, 
of Galesburg, Illinois. 

In his political views, Mr. Potter is a 
stanch advocate of the principles of the Re- 
publican party. Voting first for John C. 
Fremont in 1856, he has continued to vote 
for the nominees of that party from that 
time to the present. Both he and his wife 
are consistent members of the New England 
Congregational church of Aurora. For for- 
ty-eight years he has resided in Kane and 
DeKalb counties, while his wife has been a 
resident sixty years. In the development 
of Kane county he has borne his part well, 
and no family in Kane county is held in 
higher esteem. Honest and upright in 
character, he has made many friends 
throughout Kane and De Kalb counties. 



OAMUEL J. GIFT, a farmer residing on 
O section 15, Hampshire township, traces 
his ancestry back to Colonial times, his 
grandfather, Jeremiah Gift, who was of 
German parentage, being born in Berks 
county, Pennsylvania, where he died at a 
ripe old age. His son, Daniel Gift, the fa- 
ther of our subject, was born in Union 
county, now Snyder county, Pennsylvania, 
July 1 8, 1811, and there died June 6, 1879. 
He married Sophia Hassinger, who died at 
the age of sixty years. She was the daughter 
of Jacob Hassinger, who was also of Ger- 
man descent. To Daniel and Sophia Gift, 
ten children were born, eight of whom are 
yet living. In order of birth they were 
Samuel J., our subject; Mary, who married 
Simon Wetzel, and lives in Kansas; Ros- 
well, who served in the war for the union, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and who died in Ohio after its close; Mar- 
garet, wife of George Dibler, a retired 
farmer of Hampshire; Barbara, who mar- 
ried Philip Gilman, and lives at Milton, 
Pennsylvania; Jonathan, who also served in 
the Union army, died in Kentucky during 
the war; Emeline married Mr. Gilman, 
of Shamokin, Pennsylvania; Sarah, who 
married Reuben Bauersox, of Paxton, Penn- 
sylvania; Austin, who lives at Paxton, 
Pennsylvania; and Addie, who married Mr. 
Homer, of the same place. 

The subject of this sketch was born near 
Middleburg, Union county, Pennsylvania, 
May 22, 1832, prior to the time that county 
was cut off from Snyder county. His edu- 
cation was obtained in the subscription 
schools of his native county, before the pub- 
lic school system was adopted. The school 
facilities were very poor, the terms of school 
being short and indifferent teachers em- 
ployed. Until eighteen years of age he 
worked on the farm and then learned the 
bricklaying trade at which he continued for 
five .years. He also learned the tanner's 
trade, and was also engaged at that business 
for about five years. In 1866 he came to 
Kane county, Illinois, and rented land for 
five years, raising a crop of tobacco. In 
the fall of 1862 he came to his present 
place, comprising one hundred and twenty 
acres which he rented for five years and 
then purchased. It is fine rolling land, 
well drained with one and a half miles of 
tiling, and has on it a good, substantial 
dwelling, good barns and other outbuildings. 
Here he has resided for thirty-six years, en- 
gaged in general dairy farming. He now 
keeps about twenty head of cows, the prod- 
uct of which he sells at the creamery in 
Hampshire. 

Mr. Gift has been married three times, 



his first wife being Catherine Aurend, who 
was born in Union county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1832, and was the daughter of John 
Aurend, who married a Miss Reams. By 
this union were six children, as follows: 
James W., who married Kate Madre, by 
whom he has two children, Maggie and 
Arthur, and they reside in Kansas; Edgar 
and Agnes, who died in childhood; John D., 
who lives in Iowa; Charles E. , who is as- 
sisting his father in the cultivation of the 
home farm; and one who died in infancy. 
For his second wife, Mr. Gift married Bar- 
bara Frederick, a native of Kane county, 
Illinois, and a daughter of Mathias Fred- 
erick. By this marriage are two children, 
Emma J., who married James Kemmerling, 
and they have one child, Hilda May; Dora 
A., who married Reuben Wright. The 
third wife of Mr. Gift was Lusetta Klick, 
born in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, and 
a daughter of John and Katherine (Decker) 
Klick. Her father was the son of Conrad 
and Elizabeth (Decker) Klick, while her 
mother was a daughter of Jacob and Eliza- 
beth (Brandt) Decker. By the third mar- 
riage is one son, Edwin Henry, who is 
farming with his father. 

Mr. Gift is a member of the United 
Evangelical church. In politics he is a 
Republican, and has served his township as 
school director, road commissioner and vari- 
ous other official positions. A good neigh- 
bor and citizen, he is respected by all who 
know him. 



A LEAN L. MANN, M. D., who is suc- 
cessfully engaged in the practice of 
medicine and surgery in Elgin, with office 
in the Spurling block, was born in that city 
on the 22d of September, 1859, and is a 



312 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



son of Michael and Margaret (O'Connor) 
Mann, natives of Westmeath and Queens 
counties, Ireland, respectively. The pa- 
ternal grandfather spent his entire life in 
that country, where he died at the age of 
seventy-two years. In his family were four 
sons and four daughters. Michael O'Con- 
nor, the maternal grandfather, came to 
America in 1852 and lived for a time near 
Syracuse, New York. From that place he 
came to Elgin, where he conducted a black- 
smith shop for many years. He died here 
in 1893 at the advanced age of eighty-eight 
years. He had a family of two sons and 
three daughters. 

In 1852 the Doctor's parents also crossed 
the Atlantic and at once became residents 
of Elgin, where the father was a harness- 
maker for some years. During the Civil 
war, he served as a telegraph operator at 
the West Elgin depot, and subsequently 
followed carpentering for a number of 
years, but for the last ten or twelve years 
of his life he was engaged in commercial 
pursuits. By reason of his business acu- 
men and the exercise of thrift and frugality, 
he accumulated considerable property, be- 
ing in comfortable circumstances at the 
time of his death, which occurred in Oc- 
tober, 1895, at the age of sixty-three years, 
resulting from an accident sustained by 
being thrown from a cart while breaking a 
colt. His widow still survives him and 
lives at the old homestead with her daugh- 
ters. In the family are eight children, four 
sons and four daughters, namely: Alban 
L. ; Blanche; Godfrey; Agnes, wife of 
Frank Hurlburt; John; Maggie; James and 
Mary. 

Dr. Mann acquired his literary educa- 
tion in the schools of Elgin, and at the age 
of seventeen entered the drug store of Kel- 



ley & Hart for the purpose of acquainting 
himself with medicine preparatory to enter- 
ing a medical college. After five years in 
their employ he matriculated at Bennett 
Medical College of Chicago, where he grad- 
uated in March, 1883. For about a year 
he practiced his profession at Silver Reef 
Mining Camp, Utah, and then returned to 
Elgin, where he has since continuously en- 
gaged in practice. 

On the 7th of January, 1887, Dr. Mann 
married Miss Bertha S. Kohn, a daughter 
of Charles and Dorothea (Andorff) Kohn. 
They now .have two children Alban W. 
and Marguerite and the family have a 
pleasant home at No. 392 Chicago street. 

Socially the Doctor belongs to the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, the Modern Woodmen of 
America, the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, the Royal Arcanum, and the 
Knights of the Maccabees, and he is also a 
member of the Illinois State Eclectic Med- 
ical Society, and the Association of Military 
Surgeons of the United States, belonging 
to the last named by reason of having 
served for five years as surgeon, with the 
rank of major, in the Third Infantry, Illi- 
nois National Guard. Politically the Doc- 
tor is independent, but usually votes with 
the Republican party, and for three years 
he served as city physician. 



PETER McKINNELL, a farmer residing 
near Udina, in Elgin township, was 
born June 26, 1825, in Kirkkinner parish, 
Wigtonshire, Scotland, where his early 
life was passed. In his native land he en- 
gaged in farming, and continued in that 
occupation until his emigration to America. 
Early in December, 1854, he sailed from 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



313 



Liverpool, on "The Driver," but his vessel 
was wrecked on the Irish coast, where he 
was detained two weeks. He re-embarked 
at Liverpool on the vessel '-Constellation" 
Sunday, December 31, 1854, and after a 
voyage of four weeks reached New York 
Saturday, January 27, 1855, and landed 
Monday, the 29th. By rail he came direct 
to Chicago, but owing to heavy snowstorms 
they were a week on the way. From Chi- 
cago he came by rail to Elgin, where he 
arrived February 4, five weeks from time of 
sailing. After a short time spent in Elgin 
he moved to the northeast corner of Plato 
township, near where McQueen's station is 
now located, where he lived one year. At 
the suggestion of a cousin in business there, 
he removed to Peoria and worked for him 
one year. He then moved to the farm of 
his cousin near El Paso, Woodford county, 
which he cultivated five years. 

In the spring of 1862 Mr. McKinnell re- 
turned to Elgin, and for two and a half years 
worked out on farms to get money on which 
to again start for himself. For one year he 
had charge of the dairy farm of Martin 
McNeal, and for one year the farm of Paul 
B. Ring. He then rented the D. C. Scho- 
field farm two years, and then the large 
farm of George Stringer, now deceased, on 
which he worked fifteen years. Although 
they had no written contract, and only a 
verbal agreement, during the fifteen years 
of his tenancy no disagreement ever arose 
between him and Mr. Stringer. In the 
spring of 1883 he purchased his present 
farm of eighty-six acres. This he has since 
continued to work, together with twenty-five 
acres that he leased. The farm is used for 
grain and dairy purposes. 

Peter McKinnell is the son of James 
McKinnell, a native of the same parish in 



which he was born, and who was a farmer 
who lived and died in his native land about 
1862, at the age of seventy-seven years. 
James McKinnell married Janet Hawthorn, 
born in the parish of Newton Stewart, and 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Cleaves) 
Hawthorn, of the same parish. They were 
the parents of eight children, of whom our 
subject was the second in order of birth, 
and the only one to come to the United 
States. One brother went to Tasmania, 
and one to Buenos Ayres, South America. 

Our subject was married in the parish 
of Kirkkinner, April 20, 1854, to Miss Jessie 
McDowell, of the same parish, daughter of 
Charles McDowell, a fanner and large stock 
dealer, who died when Jessie was two years 
old. He married Miss Ellen Patterson, 
daughter of James and Janet (McHarg) Pat- 
terson. Mrs. McKinnell, who was born 
February 2, 1834, was sixth in a family of 
seven children, two of whom came to 
America John McDowell, deceased; and 
Mary, wife of William Kirkpatrick, of East 
Plato. 

To our subject and wife nine children 
have been born: Ellen Jessie, born March 
26, 1855, is now the wife of Dr. William 
Bishop, of St. Charles; Agnes, born August 
3, 1856, is the wife of William E. Marshall, 
of East Plato; Eliza Jane, born March 20, 
1858, died November 26, 1862; Mary, born 
August 24, 1860, is the wife of Fred J. 
Marshall, of Plato township; Anna, born 
January 31, 1863; James, born March 18, 
1866; one who died in infancy; George, 
born July 13, 1875; and Hattie, born Feb- 
ruary 14, 1880, died December 16, 1885. 

Mr. and Mrs. McKinnell were reared in 
the Presbyterian faith, but are now mem- 
bers of the Congregational church at Udina, 
in which he for a time was a deacon. In 



34 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



politics he is a Republican, but would never 
accept office, save that of school trustee, 
which position he filled for some years. 



SMITH YOUNGES, an energetic and 
thriving farmer residing on section 33, 
Elgin township, was born in the village of 
Amsterdam, Schoharie county, New York, 
October 17, 1852. His father, Charles 
Younges, was also a native of Schoharie 
county, where he married Miss Magdeline 
Lingenfelter, a native of Amsterdam, New 
York. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren, as follows: William, living on the 
old homestead, near Plato; Peter, residing 
in Bigelow, Kansas; James, deceased; Eliza- 
beth, wife of W. W. McDonald, of East 
Plato; Mary, wife of Dell McCarthy, of 
Watseka, Illinois; and Smith, our subject. 
Charles Younges was a farmer and stock 
trader during his entire life. He was a 
hustling, energetic man, who did all it was 
possible for any one man to do. He came 
to Kane county in 1860, but did not remove 
his family here until 1861. He first pur- 
chased the Duncan Frazer farm in St. 
Charles township, but seeing a more desira- 
ble piece of land in Plato township, forfeit- 
ed what had been paid on the Frazer farm 
and bought two hundred and ten acres near 
East Plato, where he spent the remainder 
of his life. He also bought the Sovereign 
farm in Plato township, consisting of one 
hundred and twenty acres, and also the 
Payton farm, of one hundred and sixty 
acres, in Elgin township. He was politic- 
ally, a Republican and served as school di- 
rector many terms and also supervisor of 
his township. His death occurred January 
3, 1867, at age of forty-eight years. 



Smith Younges was eleven years of age 
when he came with his parents to Kane 
county. His education began in the com- 
mon schools of Amsterdam, New York, and 
completed in the public schools of Kane 
county. At the age of nineteen he began 
life for himself, and worked by the month 
on farms for three years. He then rented 
one hundred acres from his mother which 
he cultivated three years, at the expiration 
of which time he rented the farm that he 
now owns for three years. Having been 
quite successful he purchased the place, 
which consists of two hundred acres of fine- 
ly improved land. He rebuilt the dwelling 
house and also the barn, making the latter 
thirty-six by eighty feet and also built a 
stable twenty-six by thirty feet. When the 
railroad cut through his farm, he bought 
seventeen acres where his present residence 
now stands, which with that part of his 
former farm north of the railroad track, 
makes one farm, while the south part on 
which is the old residence, makes a good 
tenant farm. Two additions have since 
been built to his residence, and he has also 
erected a new horse barn thirty by thirty- 
four feet, wagon-house, twenty by twenty- 
four, cattle sheds, sixteen by twenty, and 
cattle barn, thirty-eight by eighty-two feet. 
Youngdale Station, on the Illinois Central 
railroad, is located on his farm, and there is 
also a postoffice at the station. 

Mr. Younges was married in St. Charles 
township, December 25, 1874, to Miss Car- 
rie Person, born in that township, and the 
daughter of Parker and Aurilia (Clark) Per- 
son, natives of Vermont and New York re- 
spectively. By this union four children 
have been born: Clyde, who is assisting his 
father in the handling of stock; Nellie, 
Maude and Libbie; Maude is attending the 




SMITH YOUNGES. 




MRS. SMITH YOUNGES. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



319 



Elgin Academy; and Libbie, who is attend- 
ing the district school in Elgin. 

Politically Mr. Younges is a Republican, 
and has served as school director. Frater- 
nally he is a member of Elgin lodge, No. 
117, A. F. & A. M. He is a good business 
man and is dealing very extensively in stock, 
buying and shipping from the west more 
milch cows for the home and Chicago mar- 
kets than any dealer in this county. ^ He 
is a good judge of stock and a careful buyer, 
and he is meeting with deserved success. 



JOSEPH VOLLOR, an honored veteran 
of the Civil war, and one .of the most 
highly respected citizens of Elgin, was for 
many years actively identified with the busi- 
ness interests of the city, but is now living 
retired at his pleasant home 169 South 
Channing street. 

He is a native of Canada, born in Tor- 
onto, October 12, 1836, and is a son of 
Joseph and Ellen (Donahue) Vollor, the 
former a native of Portsmouth, England, 
and the latter of Belfast, Ireland. For 
about twenty years the father owned and 
commanded a vessel on Lake Ontario, and 
for several years carried passengers and the 
mail between Toronto and Rochester, New 
York. During the " McKenzie Rebellion ", 
as he was about to leave Toronto, one of 
his passengers (a friend of McKenzie) was 
arrested and his baggage taken to the May- 
or's office. Capt. Vollor followed and 
while addressing the mayor was requested 
by his honor to take off his hat; he refused, 
and informed the mayor that he bought the 
hat, paid for it, and would wear it; for that 
offence he was committed to jail for 24 hours. 
Capt. Vollor took the first vessel through 
the Welland Canal, also landed at Grand 

15 



Haven, Mich., the machinery for the first 
saw-mill erected in that section. His wife 
died in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1847 and 
he in 1851, at Batavia, Illinois. 

The first ten years of his life Joseph 
Vollor spent in Toronto, where he attended 
school to a limited extent and then accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. After eighteen months 
in that city the family, father and three 
children, moved to Chicago and six months 
later to Batavia, Illinois. Upon .the death 
of his father Joseph Vollor was taken by 
Spencer Johnson, a farmer, to keep until 
he became of age, the understanding being 
that he^would attend school three months 
each winter,- .and when twenty-one would 
receive one hundred dollars and two suits of 
clothes. The last winter he attended school 
but four weeks, as he had been notified that 
he would have to "speak a piece" before 
the school on Friday afternoon. He con- 
cluded that he was not cut out for an ora- 
tor, and when Friday noon came around he 
gathered up his books, went home and cut 
stove wood the balance of the winter. 

In 1859 he was taken with the Pike's 
Peak fever, and with his hard earned sav- 
ings invested in teams, provisions and outfit 
necessary for gold mining, full of hope and 
with big letters, " Pike's Peak or Bust," on 
his wagon cover, he started. Did not get 
half way before thousands were met com- 
ing back, hungry and foot sore, and he and 
his companion had to join the procession 
and return. When the outfit was disposed 
of he had but little left of his seven years 
hard earnings, and felt that he was " busted." 
In 1860 he worked a farm on shares, and 
crops being extra good he cleared about 
$400, which he took with him to Chicago 
in September and went through a course in 



320 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College. 
He deposited his money in a bank and lost 
something over $200 by failure. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War Mr. 
Vollor was residing at Batavia and enlisted 
under first call for troops, but company was 
not accepted ; enlisted twice afterwards 
and was finally, on the ist day of August, 
1 86 1, mustered in as fourth corporal 
Company I, Forty-Second Illinois In- 
fantry. In September the regiment pro- 
ceeded to St. Louis, Missouri, and for a 
time was quartered in Benton Barracks, 
where daily drills were had, and arms 
were furnished. From Benton Barracks 
took boat for Jefferson City, where the 
regiment received twenty-four six- muled 
teams two for each company and four for 
headquarters, including hospital. After re- 
ceiving transportation and equipment regi- 
ment was started on a tramp for Spring- 
field, Missouri, after rebel army, under 
Price. From Springfield tramped back to 
Smithton, which was headquarters for the 
regiment. Mr. Vollor's company (I) was 
stationed at Farmers' City, about two miles 
farther west, and patrolled the railroad be- 
tween there and Sedalia. Col. Webb and 
many of the larger and apparently strong- 
est men of the regiment died during the 
winter. Company I being alone, some of 
the members would go out nights and con- 
fiscate bee-hives, geese, chickens and other 
good things. In February, 1862, started 
on march to St. Louis, and there took boats 
for Cairo and crossed the river from there 
to Fort Holt, Kentucky. Fort Donelson 
prisoners had just arrived at Cairo when 
Forty-second reached there. In a short 
time were ordered to Columbus, Kentucky, 
and werethe first infantry to enter the place. 

After remaining at Columbus a short 



time accompanied the gunboat fleet down 
the river to Island No. 10, where mortar 
boats amused the Johnnies for several weeks 
by throwing fifteen-inch shells over the isl- 
and every fifteen minutes only damage to 
the enemy being the breaking of one leg of 
a mule. The gunboats did a great deal of 
firing at a battery in bend of river on the 
Tennessee shore, but did little damage. 
Colonel G. W. Roberts, of the Forty-sec- 
ond Illinois, became restive at waste of time 
and ammunition, and offered to take fifty 
men of his regiment if boats would be 
furnished him and go down and spike the 
battery. Boats were furnished, and he went 
down on the night of April i, 1862, during 
a terrible wind and rain storm, and spiked 
the battery he being the first man ashore 
and driving the first spike. A few nights 
after a gunboat ran by the island, later 
others followed, and on April jth the Rebels 
surrendered about sixty-five hundred prison- 
ers, seven thousand small arms and one 
hundred pieces of artillery. 

After surrender of Island No. 10, regi- 
ment proceeded to Fort Pillow, remained a 
short time, and then took boats for Ham- 
burg Landing, Mississippi, to take part in 
siege of Corinth. During siege, engaged in 
battle of Farmington, where the regiment 
made the Johnnies a present of all knap- 
sacks and contents. Mr. Vollor had in his 
quite a sized book, in which he had been 
keeping a record of daily experiences. 
Thinks if he had the book now he would 
keep it under lock, as there were things re- 
corded that might not read well at the pres- 
ent time. 

Flag of Forty-second Illinois was first 
to float over Corinth after the Rebels left. 
Followed Rebels to Rienzi and in few days 
returned to Camp Blue Springs near Cor- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



321 



inth. While there, were furnished with 
"pup Tents" in exchange for Sibley's; ten 
companies were also furnished with Austrian 
rifles and saber bayonets in exchange for 
the almost worthless Springfield muskets, 
received at St. Louis. From Blue Springs 
regiment with two pieces of artillery was 
ordered to Cortland, Alabama, and remained 
there from July 25th until September 3d, 
1862, when were started on forced march 
for Nashville, Tennessee, and on the way 
took part in a skirmish with Rebel cavalry 
at Columbia, losing one man killed while 
Rebels lost eight killed and forty-five wound- 
ed. The march to Nashville was a hard 
one, the weather being very hot, and the 
broken stone roads caused many blistered 
feet. Mr. Vollor had, on one day, three 
blisters on bottom of one foot and two on 
other. He was the only non-commissioned 
officer (except the orderly) of Company I 
to get into camp with the colors. A ser- 
geant was called for for picket and there 
being none in camp Mr. Vollor (a corporal) 
had to go. He considered that he was 
punished for keeping up on the march. 

The Forty-second occupied Nashville 
during the race between Buell and Bragg's 
armies through Kentucky. Being cut off 
from base of supplies army rations were 
short, but by foraging, a good supply of 
sweet potatoes and sometimes fresh pork 
was procured. After the return of the army, 
then under command of Gen. Rosecrans, 
Col. Roberts, who was very ambitious and 
opposed to doing garrison duty, requested 
that his regiment (the Forty-second Illinois) 
be allowed to join the army then preparing 
to move on Murfreesboro. His wish was 
granted and he was assigned to the com- 
mand of a brigade, composed of the Twenty- 
second, Twenty-seventh, Forty-second and 



Fifty-first Illinois regiments, in Sheridan's 
division of the Twentieth Corps, commanded 
by Alex. McDowell McCook. 

On December 26, 1862, the army under 
Rosecrans started on a winter campaign 
toward Murfreesboro. The rain came down 
in torrents all day and a bitter cold wind 
blew from the northeast. The condition 
and feelings of the men when night came 
can be imagined better than described. 
There were no tents for shelter that night, 
and no fires could be built to make coffee. 
With 'plenty of hot coffee the boys could 
endure almost any exposure without it life 
was hardly worth living. Mr. Vollor says 
he will never forget that night. Sitting on 
the wet ground, at the roots of a large tree, 
with cape of overcoat over his head, he 
would doze for a short time and would 
awake so cold that he had to get up and 
walk around. That was kept up during the 
.night. On December 3Oth arrived within 
two and a half miles of Murfreesboro and 
had skirmish with the enemy in which 
quite a number of the Forty-second were 
killed and wounded. Rebel cavalry had 
captured and destroyed a large number of 
wagons loaded with rations, and the morn- 
ing of the 3 ist found the men with empty 
haversacks, preparing for one of the blood- 
iest battles of the war. A little corn meal 
had been secured the day before and some 
mush had been made by some of the Forty- 
second. As the men of Sheridan's Division 
stood under arms at 3 o'clock that winter 
morning and listened to the reading of or- 
ders from General Rosecrans little did they 
realize what they would pass through before 
night. The Forty-second Illinois took acon- 
spicuous part in the battle, and while regi- 
ment was falling back to escape capture the 
Rebels coming in on their flank Mr. Vollor 



322 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was hit on foot by a spent ball, also on right 
elbow, his gun dropping from his hands. 
Although the Rebels were close on to him 
he stopped and picked his gun up and by 
doing so came near being captured. He 
was unable to use his arm for a week or 
more but kept his position with his com- 
pany. Three balls passed through his cloth- 
ing during the battle. His name is on Roll 
of Honor of Army of the Cumberland for 
meritorious service, was also promoted from 
Fourth Corporal of Company I, to quarter- 
master sergeant of the regiment. 

During a foraging expedition near Mur- 
freesboro, a company of Rebels attacked the 
foraging party, but were dispersed, some 
of the enemy being discovered in the woods 
for the purpose of picking off Union gun- 
ners. Mr. Vollor and three men went out 
got in their rear and brought two of them 
in, and for this action received commenda- 
tion. When the army moved out from 
Murfreesboro, the objective point being 
Chattanooga, Mr. Vollor, as quartermaster- 
sergeant, was in charge of his regimental 
train. The crossing of Raccoon and Look- 
out mountains was difficult and dangerous. 
While ascending Lookout, after dark, a six- 
mule team, a short distance ahead of Mr. 
Vollor's wagon became frightened at some 
object and unmanageable and went off the 
side of the mountain, which was very steep. 
Mules were killed and kindling wood made 
of wagon. After reaching top of mountain 
Mr. Vollor discovered a sutler's wagon a 
few wagons ahead of his, and during the 
darkness he succeeded in borrowing a num- 
ber of boxes of sardines, cans of fruit and 
other eatables. On igth and 2Oth of Sep- 
tember, occurred battle of Chickamauga, 
where Forty-second Illinois lost in killed, 
twenty-eight; wounded, one hundred and 



twenty-eight; prisoners, thirty-six, out of a 
total of less than four hundred and fifty. 
The greater part of loss occurred inside of 
thirty minutes. After Chickamauga the 
Army of the Cumberland was shut up 
around Chattanooga on short rations 
and in danger of starvation. Ten thousand 
horses and mules starved to death, and ac- 
cording to General Grant's report there 
were not horses enough in the Army of the 
Cumberland to haul a single piece of artil- 
lery. General Grant telegraphed Thomas: 
"Hold Chattanooga at all hazards." He 
replied, "We will hold it till we starve." 
Mr. Vollor says he felt as if a person stand- 
ing in front of him could see his backbone. 
He saw men pick kernels of corn out of 
mud and manure, and parch it to eat. The 
arrival of Eleventh and Twelfth Corps 
saved the army from starvation. 

On November 25th, the battle of Mission 
Ridge was fought, and resulted in a glori- 
ous victory. General Grant says in his 
memoirs, to Sheridan's prompt movement 
the Army of the Cumberland and the na- 
tion are indebted for the bulk of the cap- 
ture of prisoners, artillery and small arms 
that day. Mr. Vollor followed the troops 
in the charge and helped take care of 
wounded, although his position did not re- 
quire him to be there. Shortly after the 
Fourth Corps was sent to Knoxviile to the 
relief of Burnside, and Mr. Vollor was de- 
tailed to take charge of tools of his brigade. 
Remained in East Tennessee during the 
winter without tents, but little clothing and 
short rations. Bran bread was a luxury. 
On the memorable cold January i, 1864, 
while bivouacked in the woods with two 
inches of snow, and mercury three degrees 
below zero, a majority of the Forty-second 
re-enlisted for another three years, and Mr. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



323 



Vollor again put his name down as a private 
of Company I. 

On the way to Knoxville, the home of a 
Rebel colonel was passed. In a storeroom 
a barrel of sorghum syrup was found, and 
soon a line of blue coats with tin cups were 
going in the back door, dipping the cups in 
the barrel and rushing out through the front 
parlor with syrup dripping all over the 
carpet. It was the first house Mr. Vollor 
had entered to take anything. He had 
sympathy for the female Rebel who was 
calling his comrades all sorts of names. 
Mr. Vollor, before reaching Knoxville, 
picked up a very fine pair of mules, which 
had been used for a carriage team. He 
was offered four hundred dollars for them 
by a sutler, but refused, and put them in 
one of his teams. 

In February the regiment started for 
Chattanooga on their way home on a thirty- 
days' furlough. Next morning, after reach- 
ing Chattanooga, the fine mules were miss- 
ing, and Mr. Vollor had to pick up a pair 
that had been turned out to die, in order to 
to have the right number to turn over to the 
post quartermaster. He regretted that he 
did not take the four hundred dollars. The 
regiment took the furlough, and returned to 
Chattanooga the latter part of April, and 
became a part of Sherman's army for the 
Atlanta campaign. Mr. Vollor was again 
appointed quartermaster-sergeant, and acted 
as quartermaster during the campaign, the 
quartermaster being sick at Chattanooga. 
The Forty-second Illinois took part in the 
following engagements during the Atlanta 
campaign Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, 
Adairsville, New Hope Church, Pine Mount- 
ain, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, 
Siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro and Lovejoy 
Station. After the capture of Atlanta, and 



before Sherman started on his march to the 
sea, the Fourth Corps was sent back to 
Chattanooga, and the Forty-second was 
stationed for a while at Bridgeport, and 
from there went to Pulaski, Tennessee; 
remained there until Hood started in on his 
invasion of Tennessee, and fell back with 
the rest of the army toward Nashville. 
The Forty-second received a number of new 
recruits at Spring Hill, several of whom 
were killed during some severe fighting at 
points, the enemy having made attempt to 
capture trains that were packed by the 
roadside. Trains were on the move all 
night toward Franklin, and many times 
during the night were fired on by Rebel cav- 
alry. The next day (3oth) some Rebel cav- 
alry with blue overcoats came in from a 
crossroad and commenced firing, killing a 
number of mules and burning wagons. 
Some of the drivers became demoralized 
and jumped from their mules and sought 
shelter. One driver was stopped by Mr. 
Vollor threatening to shoot him. The 
driver thanked him afterward for keeping 
him from being a coward. 

November 3, 1864, was fought the battle 
of Franklin for the number of men engaged 
and the time it lasted, the hardest fought bat- 
tle of the war. Rebel loss, one thousand, sev- 
en hundred and fifty killed, three thousand, 
eight hundred wounded, among them six 
generals killed and six wounded. Union 
loss was light, comparatively. During the 
night fell back to Nashville and remained 
until December 15 and 16, when battle of 
Nashville was fought. While there the 
colonel of the Forty-second sent to the 
governor for a commission as first lieutenant 
for Mr. Vollor, but it was not granted. Dur- 
ing battle of Nashville, while riding through 
a cornfield, Mr. Vollor was fired at, ball 



324 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cutting off corn stalk near his horse's head. 
From Nashville regiment pursued the enemy 
about eighty miles to Lexington, and then 
marched to Decatur, Alabama, leaving there 
April i, 1865, for East Tennessee, it being 
thought that Lee's army might undertake to 
come through. Heard of Lee's surrender 
and Lincoln's assassination while there. The 
Forty-second returned to Nashville, remained 
until June, and then, with balance of Fourth 
Corps, embarked for New Orleans, en route 
to Texas, it being thought at the time that 
there might be some trouble with Maximil- 
ian. Mr. Vollor was left to follow with 
transportation and camp equipage, and when 
he reached Cairo he invested fifty dollars in 
condensed milk at one dollar per can and a 
lot of soft bread, and for a few days he and 
the men who were with him lived high. 
Arrived at Vicksburg afternoon of July 4, 
remaining until next day. In evening at- 
tended a negro dance. It was terribly hot, 
and concluded it was pleasanter in open air. 
Reached New Orleans about roth and found 
regiment on bank of river below the city. 
A short time after, embarked for Port La- 
vaca, Texas, where remained a short time 
and afterward went into camp some distance 
out on prairie, and were finally mustered out 
on December 15, 1865, and started for home. 
Total enrollment of Forty-second Illinois 
was one thousand, six hundred and twenty- 
two, of whom one hundred and eighty-one 
were killed, four hundred and seventy-three 
wounded, two hundred and six died of dis- 
ease and accident and thirty-three in Rebel 
prisons. The Forty-second is numbered as 
one of Colonel Fox's three hundred fighting 
regiments. While in Texas Mr. Vollor re- 
ceived commission as first lieutenant and 
quartermaster. Were in New Orleans on 
Christmas eve and needed mosquito netting 



to protect us from the pests. Were paid off 
at Springfield on January 10, 1866, nearly 
four and one-half years after first muster. 
Mr. Vollor is proud to say that he has no 
hospital record, being one of those who es- 
caped being shot and had little sickness. 
Although has at times been laid up for sev- 
eral weeks by rheumatism and having heart 
trouble, has not drawn a pension. 

After the war Mr. Vollor returned to 
Batavia for a time, and then was employed 
as bookkeeper in a wholesale house in Chi- 
cago. Later went into wholesale wooden- 
ware, cordage and notion business, and was 
cleaned out by the big fire of 1871. In 
1872 went to Portland, Maine, and for two 
and one-half years had charge of the busi- 
ness of Curtis & Son, and then returned to 
Elgin and for many years did an extensive 
business as a manufacturer of chewing gum. 
Mr. Vollor is one of those who believes "the 
laborer is worthy of his hire, "and always 
paid nearly double the wages that any other 
manufacturers of chewing gum did. 

In 1868 Mr. Vollor married Miss Martha 
C. Waldron, a daughter of Andrew J. and 
Calista S. (Smith) Waldron, and to them 
have been born three children: Joseph Tru- 
man died in Portland, Dunbar W. married 
Grace Bristol, of Galesburg, Illinois, and 
has one daughter, Madelin. He is now em- 
ployed in the Home National Bank of El- 
gin. Helen is with her parents. Mrs. Vollor 
is a member of the Universalist church, and 
a most estimable lady. 

Since casting his first vote for John C. 
Fremont first candidate of the Republican 
party for the presidency Mr. Vollor has 
been unwavering in his support of the 
G. O. P. He is one of the most prominent 
members of Veteran post 49, G. A. R. , of 
Elgin; served four years as its quartermaster, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



325 



two years a junior vice-commander and 
three years as commander. He is also a 
member of the Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion, and at the present time is president 
of the Veteran Republican Club, which is 
composed of old soldiers, also president of 
Forty-second Illinois Veteran Association. 
He served on staff of Commander-in-chief 
Adams, and on the staff of three different 
department commanders. His loyalty as a 
citizen and his devotion to the interests of 
his adopted country have been among his 
most prominent characteristics. He is more 
thoroughly American than many who are 
native born. The community is fortunate 
that numbers him among its citizens. 



JABEZ SWITZER, now living a retired 
life in Plato township, traces hfs descent 
back to one of three brothers of Swiss origin, 
who were residing in France and were com- 
pelled, on account of religious persecutions, 
to flee the country during the time of Louis 
XIV. They enlisted under the banner of 
William, Prince of Orange, were officers, 
and participated in the battles of Boyne, 
and were allotted portions of the territory 
for their services. From one of these 
brothers descended John Switzer, who set- 
tled in Tipperary. His son, Martin, was 
the first of the family to come to America. 
In 1803, Martin Switzer married Mary 
Maurice, and in July, 1804, came to Amer- 
ica, settling at Elizabeth, New Jersey, 
where he lived until after the war of 1812. 
He then moved to New York, and later, in 
1820, to Canada, where he secured one 
hundred acres of land and engaged in farm- 
ing. Martin Switzer was the father of 
Samuel, whose third son, Samuel, was the 
father of Jabez Switzer, of this sketch. 



One of the ancestors of Mary Maurice was 
among the supporters of Cromwell in 1640. 

Jabez Switzer was born near Streets- 
ville, Ontario, Canada, August 7, 1848, and 
was ninth in a family of ten children. One 
year later his parents came to Kane county, 
locating three miles from St. Charles. On 
his father's farm he grew to manhood, and 
received his education in the country schools, 
supplemented by an attendance in the St. 
Charles High School. His mother died in 
Canada while he was an infant, and his 
father in 1853, when he was but five years 
old. His brother was appointed his guardian, 
and with him he remained until he was 
eighteen years of age, when he married and 
rented a farm near Chebanse, Iroquois 
county, Illinois, one year, and one year 
near Kankakee. He then returned to Kane 
county, and for a short time worked for his 
brother, when, in 1867, he came to his 
present farm on section 1 1, Plato township, 
which he rented one year on shares, and 
three years for cash. In 1871 he bought 
the farm, consisting of one hundred and 
sixty acres, and for some years engaged in 
raising grain principally, but for the past 
few years has devoted himself to dairying/ 
On the first of March, 1898, he retired from 
active farming, leasing his farm to his son, 
Ira J., who is now in control of the place. 

Jabez Switzer was married, February 
14, 1866, in St. Charles, Kane county, to 
Miss Elizabeth Banks, a native of England, 
who came to America at the age of ten 
years, lived in Canada four years, and then 
came to St. Charles, Kane county. She is 
the daughter of Robert and Hannah (Butler) 
Banks, the latter being a daughter of John 
Butler, who died when she was quite young, 
so she knew but little of his ancestry. Han- 
nah Banks dying, her husband married 



326 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Rachel Swales, daughter of William and 
Elinor Swales, by whom Hannah was 
reared. A drinking glass that belonged to 
them is treasured by Mrs. Switzer for its 
age and associations. 

Robert Banks was born at Water, York- 
shire, England, in 1814, and died July u, 
1877. He was a man of fine education, a 
writer of no little literary ability, and a 
teacher for some years. In England he was 
a mill-owner and lived at Brampton, near 
Scarborough. In emigrating to America, 
he sailed from Liverpool, on the 2ist of 
March, 1849, and was six weeks in making 
the voyage, which was a stormy one, the 
captain declaring it the worst that he had 
experienced in twenty years. At one 
time the ship was on fire, and the passen- 
gers were greatly alarmed. They landed at 
New York and in a few days went 'to To- 
ronto, Canada, and later to Simcoe county, 
where he settled, and bought two hundred 
acres of land. After residing there three 
years, he sold out and came to Illinois, and 
rented a farm near Fayville. He also 
taught school near Huntley. Later he re- 
moved to St. Charles, and worked at mill- 
ing until he retired from active life. Of 
the ten children born to Robert Banks and 
wife, all attained maturity and six of these 
still survive. 

To Jabez and Elizabeth Switzer, thir- 
teen children were born, nine of whom are 
yet living: (i) Ray, deceased. (2) Hor- 
tense, who married E. D. Pease, of Elgin, 
by whom she has five children: Helen J., 
Minnie L. , Elizabeth E., Clarence D. and 
Glenn I. (3) Joseph Robert, who married 
Emma Robinson, by whom he has one son, 
Robert J., and they now reside in Chicago. 
(4) Ira J. married Mamie Brady, born in 
North Plato, and daughter of Henry 



and Lily (Collins) Brady, and they have one 
son, Arthur Walter, born June 20, 1895. 
Ira J. Switzer attended the Pingree Grove 
School, Elgin Academy and Drew's Busi- 
ness College. Fraternally he is a member 
of Pingree Grove Camp, No. 65 5, M. W. A. 
(S) Salina E., who married Charles Camp- 
bell, by whom she had one son, Lawrence 
C. Her husband is now deceased. (6) 
Grace A., deceased. (7) Blanche. (8) 
Mabel, deceased. (10) Eva May. (u) 
Minnie, deceased. (12) Alice I. (13) Boyd. 
Mr. Switzer is a member of Oak Leaf 
Tent, No. 22,508, K. O. T. M. of Pingree 
Grove. Politically he is a Democrat and 
served some years as school director. As a 
citizen he has done his full share in develop- 
ing the material interests of Kane county. 



EDWARD S. SMITH, who is engaged in 
the real estate, insurance and loan busi- 
ness, at Batavia, has been a resident of 
Kane county for a period of forty-five years. 
He is a native of New York, born in Es- 
sex county, on the borders of Lake Cham- 
plain, March 20, 1832, and is the son of 
Elias Smith, born in Washington county, 
New York, of which his father was an early 
settler. Elias Smith, who was a soldier in the 
war of 1812, for which service he received 
a land warrant, grew to manhood in his na- 
tive county and there married Miss Zeruiah 
Reed, also a native of Washington county, 
New York. Soon after their marriage, they 
moved to Moriah, Essex county, near Lake 
Champlain, where the remainder of their 
lives were spent, and where they reared their 
family, and where they both died, the fa- 
ther at the age of eighty-three years, the 
mother at the age of forty-one years. 

Until the age of fifteen years, our sub- 




E. S. SMITH. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



329 



ject remained under the parental roof, and 
received his education in the public schools 
and the academy. He then went to Sara- 
toga, and spent one year, then accepted a 
position in the mercantile establishment of 
J. & J. H. Peck & Company, of Burlington, 
Vermont, where he received his business 
education, remaining with them five years. 
In 1853, a young man who had just passed 
his majority, he came to Batavia, Illinois, 
and for the first year was in the grain busi- 
ness, as the junior member of the firm of 
Rogers & Smith. He was then associated 
with Mr. Harris Hoyt, in the manufacture 
of barrels by machinery for about two years, 
the business proving financially disastrous. 
For a time he was connected with various 
enterprises and for many years agent of the 
American Express Company. In 1861, he 
was appointed by Montgomery Blair, post- 
master-general under President Lincoln, as 
postmaster of Batavia, and by successive re- 
appointments served a period of twenty-five 
years, under seven different presidents. 
That he made a satisfactory officer is at- 
tested by his long continued service. 

Mr. Smith was united in marriage, in 
Batavia, Illinois, April 15, 1861, to Jane M. 
Mallory, a native of Penn Yan, Yates coun- 
ty, New York, who came to Batavia, Illi- 
nois, when fifteen years of age, and was 
educated in the schools of Batavia and 
Evanston, Illinois; her father, Smith L. 
Mallory, was a prominent railroad contract- 
or. By this union are five children, as fol- 
lows: Elinor Louise, now the wife of Rev. 
P. C. Walcott, of Highland Park, Lake 
county, Illinois; Mary W., wife of Fred 
H. Burke, a resident of Batavia; Ed- 
ward M., who is associated with his father 
in the insurance and real estate business. 
Frank P., who resides at home; and Jessie 



M., who is now one of the teachers of the 
West Batavia public schools. 

Mr. Smith fiist began the insurance busi- 
ness in 1859, but abandoned it after receiv- 
ing his appointment as postmaster. When 
he retired from that office, he again re- 
sumed the insurance business, in which he 
has continued to the present time. In July, 
1890, he was appointed to a position in the 
sub-treasury, by Colonel Dustin, and served 
during Harrison's administration. He has 
been identified with the Republican party 
since its organization, and has never missed 
casting his vote for the presidential nomi- 
nee of that party, up to the present time. 
In addition to the offices already mentioned 
as held by him, he has served as town 
clerk, village trustee and other minor posi- 
tions. In the various conventions of his 
party he has frequently served as a delegate, 
and in them has wielded considerable influ- 
ence. Religiously, he is liberal in his views 
but attends the Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which his wife is a member, while some 
of the family are Protestant Episcopal. 
Fraternally, he is a Master Mason and for 
many years served as secretary of the 
lodge. As a citizen he is held in the high- 
est esteem and is popular with all classes in 
the community. 



JACOB R. GORHAM. In the respect 
that is accorded to men who have fought 
their way to success through unfavorable 
environments we find an unconcious recog- 
nition of the intrinsic worth of a character 
which cannot only endure so rough a test, 
but gain new strength through the disci- 
pline. The following history sets forth 
briefly the steps which our subject, now one 



330 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD 



of the substantial citizens of St. Charles, 
overcame the disadvantages of his early life. 
Coming to this section of the state Novem- 
ber 1 8, 1852, he was for many years active- 
ly identified with the farming and stock 
raising interests of Du Page and Kane coun- 
ties, but having secured an ample fortune, 
he has now laid aside all business cares. 

Mr. Gorham was born September 26, 
1830, in Dutchess county. New York, a son 
of William Gorham, whose birth occurred 
in Stratford, Connecticut, about 1780. His 
grandfather, Stephen Gorham, was a native 
of France, and came to the new world 
with General LaFayette to aid the colonies 
in their struggle for independence during the 
Revolutionary war. Subsequently he lo- 
cated in Stratford, Connecticut, and for the 
remainder of his life was a pilot, holding a 
government license, which allowed him to 
conduct vessels through Hell Gate. In his 
family were five sons who were reared in 
Connecticut. Two of them located in 
Great Barrington, Massachusetts; Louis, a 
farmer by occupation; and Le Grand, a mil- 
ler and hotel keeper; Kirk was a tailor by 
trade; Benjamin went to the West Indies. 
Two of these never married. 

William Gorham, our subject's father, 
completes the family. At an early day he 
removed to Pawling, Dutchess county, New 
York, where he established two tan yards, 
being a tanner and currier by trade, and 
also engaged in farming and merchandizing 
with good success, accumulating a nice 
estate. He married Sarah Holloway, a 
native of Pawling, and a daughter of Justin 
Holloway, who was also born in Dutchess 
county. Our subject's great-grandfather 
Parks, on the maternal side, was a Revolu- 
tionary soldier, and lived to the advanced 
age of ninety years. Mr. and Mrs. Gor- 



ham came to Illinois and spent their last 
years in Will county, the father dying dur- 
ing the Civil war. The mother survived 
him a few years, passing away at the age 
of eighty-four years. 

In their family were the following chil- 
dren: Hannah Etta married a Mr. Dodge, 
and first located in Dutchess county, New 
York, but later came to Will county, Illi- 
nois, where she died; Mary Ann is the 
widow of R. H. Leake, and is a resident of 
St. Charles; Akin H. died at his home in 
Will county; Emma E. married a Mr. Cald- 
well, of Dutchess county, New York, and 
both are now deceased; Jacob R. , of this 
sketch, is the next of the family; Elijah is 
engaged in the grain business in Russell 
county, Kansas; and William was killed by 
lightning at his home in Du Page county, 
Illinois. 

Reared in Dutchess county, New York, 
Jacob R. Gorham obtained a good com- 
mon-school education, and assisted his fa- 
ther in the work of the farm and tan yard 
until twenty-one years of age. Determined 
to try his fortune in the west, he came alone 
to Du Page county, Illinois, and at first 
worked on a farm in Wayne township. 
With a partner, he afterward engaged in 
farming, and in 1853 successfully operated 
a farm on the shares. Borrowing one hun- 
dred dollars, he began buying and selling 
cattle, and in this business cleared about 
eight hundred dollars. The following fall 
he returned to New York, but after visiting 
his parents and friends for three months, he 
again came to Wayne township, Du Page 
county, where he purchased a farm, though 
he went in debt for it. In connection with 
farming, he continued to engage in stock 
dealing, and after operating that place until 
1860, he sold and bought a larger farm in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



331 



the same neighborhood, residing there for 
five years. 

In Du Page county, Mr. Gorham was 
married in 1855 to Miss Adelia Read, a na- 
tive of that county, and the only daughter 
of Horace Read, one of the earliest settlers 
of that county, having located there in 1836. 
He was a native of Cambridge, Vermont, 
was a soldier of the war of 1812, and died 
in this state in 1867. After his death, Mr. 
Gorham sold his place in Wayne township 
and removed to the Read farm, which he 
operated for a number of years and still 
owns. He was one of the most successful 
stock dealers in this section of the state, 
and through his own unaided efforts and ex- 
cellent management, he has acquired a 
handsome property, including a- farm of 
three hundred and thirty-seven acres in 
Wayne township, Du Page county; another 
of one hundred and forty acres in Carnpton 
township, four miles west of St. Charles, 
and three hundred and twenty acres of land 
in Kansas, besides his pleasant home in St. 
Charles. He removed to that city in 1884, 
and has since lived retired, enjoying the 
fruits of his former toil. During his resi- 
dence here, however, he has stimulated in- 
dustries in Kane and Du Page counties, by 
loaning money. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gorham have four daugh- 
ters, namely: Mira, now the wife of F. W. 
Leake.a merchant of St. Charles; Augusta, 
wife of C. S. Green, of Kane county; Edith 
L. , wife of Merritt Green, now of Dutchess 
county, New York; and Mamie, who is a 
graduate of the St. Charles high school, and 
resides with her parents. Since retiring 
from active business, Mr. and Mrs. Gorham 
have traveled quite extensively over the 
south and west, and also frequently visited 
his old home in Dutchess county, NewYork. 



Politically he has always been a stanch sup- 
porter of the Democratic party, but has 
never had any aspiration for office, prefer- 
ring to give his undivided attention to his 
business interests. In the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, of St. Charles, he and his 
family hold membership, and in the social 
circks of the community they occupy an en- 
viable position. A man of strict integrity 
and sterling worth, Mr. Gorham commands 
the respect of all with whom he comes in 
contact, and. the success that he has achieved 
in life is certainly well .deserved. For forty- 
five years he has been identified with the 
interests of this section of the state and his 
circle of friends is extensive. 



HARMAN Y. LONGACRE, M. D., is 
an enterprising and representative busi- 
ness man of St. Charles, where he has suc- 
cessfully conducted a drug-store since Au- 
gust, 1883, and has also engaged in the 
practice of his profession to a limited extent. 
He was born December 31, 1853, near 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a son of David 
and Hannah B. (Reinhart) Longacre, also 
natives of the Keystone state. The paternal 
grandfather was born in Saxony, Germany, 
and was an early settler of Pennsylvania. 
For many years the Doctor's father engaged 
in the drug business near Philadelphia, but 
is now spending his declining years upon a 
farm. The mother died in 1870. In the 
family were two sons and two daughters 
who reached years of maturity, the brother 
of our subject being Milton P., who mar- 
ried and engaged in the manufacture of 
lumber in Indiana, where his death occurred. 
In Pennsylvania Dr. Longacre grew to 
manhood, completing his literary education 
in the State Normal School at Millersville, 



332 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and subsequently he successfully engaged in 
teaching school for about two years. In 
his father's store he became thoroughly 
familiar with the drug business, which has 
principally claimed his attention throughout 
his business career. Entering the Michigan 
University at Ann Arbor, in 1874, he at- 
tended medical lectures there for two years, 
graduating with a class of sixty in the spring 
of 1876. He then located in Titusville, 
Pennsylvania, where he engaged in the 
practice of medicine for two years, and for 
the same length of time practiced in Olney, 
Illinois. At the end of that time he went 
to Chicago and took charge of a drug-store, 
which he conducted for two years. In 
August, 1883, we find him in St. Charles, 
where he has since made his home, while 
he has been actively and prominently identi- 
fied with the business interests of the place. 
Purchasing a drug-store, he successfully 
carried on the same until April, 1885, when 
his stock of goods and building were de- 
stroyed by fire. With characteristic energy, 
however, he had opened another store in 
the Hunt block at the end of three months, 
and is now doing an excellent business. He 
also gives some attention to the practice of 
medicine, though principally confined to an 
office practice. 

In St. Charles, Dr. Longacre was mar- 
ried in 1884, to Miss Nettie B. Norton, who 
was born, reared and educated in Kane 
county, and they now have one son, Frank 
H. Since attaining his majority the Doctor 
has been a stanch supporter of the Repub- 
lican party, but has never cared for official 
honors, preferring to give his undivided at- 
tention to his business interests. Fra- 
ternally he is a Royal Arch Mason, having 
joined the blue lodge in Pennsylvania, and 
also united with the Odd Fellows Society 



in that state in 1876. He has filled all the 
chairs in the former order, and is past grand 
of the latter. He is also a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America. A very 
agreeable and affable gentleman, he has 
made made many friends during his resi- 
dence in St. Charles, and receives and 
merits the high regard of the entire com- 
munity. His estimable wife is a member of 
the Congregational church. 



REV. W. D. ATCHISON, chaplain of 
the insane hospital at Elgin, has de- 
voted his life to the ministry and in that 
noble calling his influence has been wide- 
spread, bringing comfort and happiness to 
many saddened hearts, while into many 
darkened lives he has brought the light of 
Christianity. He was born in Mercer coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, February 19, 1833, a son 
of Matthew and Mary (Dowling) Atchison, 
who were also natives of the Keystone 
state. On the paternal side he is of Scotch 
descent, his grandfather, John Atchison, 
having been a native of that land of hills 
and heather. Coming to America, he lo- 
cated in Redstone, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania. He was accompanied by two 
brothers, one of whom, Matthew, took up 
his residence in Ohio, while the third set- 
tled in Kentucky. The grandfather spent 
the remainder of his life in Pennsylvania, 
where he died at an advanced age. The 
maternal grandfather of Rev. Atchison was 
James Dowling, who was born in the north 
of Ireland, of Scotch lineage. He came 
to the United States about the time of the 
Revolutionary war, and followed farming as 
a life occupation. His death occurred at the 
age of sixty years. The history of the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



333 



Dowling family can be traced back prior to 
the advent of Christianity in Ireland. The 
wife of James Dowling was a relative of 
Lord Nelson, the great Irish admiral. 

Matthew Atchison, father of our subject, 
was a millwright and carpenter, following 
those pursuits in order to provide for his 
large family. He died in his native state 
when about forty-four years of age. By 
his marriage he had thirteen children, nine 
of whom are now living, while four have 
reached the age of three score and ten. 
Those who still survive are: James, who 
is living near Kirwin, Kansas; Sarah, wife 
of Donald McKenzie, of Elizabeth, Illinois; 
John, of Lena, Illinois; Nelson, of Eliza- 
beth, Illinois; Mary, wife of Solomon Snod- 
grass, of Jo Daviess county, Illinois; Will- 
iam Dowling; Jane, widow of Samuel Mc- 
Grath, of Freeport, Illinois; Samuel, of La- 
nark, Illinois; and Matthew, of Elizabeth, 
Illinois, are half brothers, the mother having 
married for her second husband Thomas 
Gault. 

Rev. William D. Atchison resided in 
Mercer county, Pennsylvania, until fourteen 
years of age, and then came to Illinois with 
his mother and stepfather, locating in Jo 
Daviess county, about fifteen miles from 
Galena, where he resided until eighteen 
years of age. In the meantime he had in 
contemplation the work of the ministry. 
When only thirteen years of age he was 
converted and felt the call to preach and all 
his aims and hopes were directed toward 
that end. Prayer was always to him a 
means of strength and help and the study 
of the Bible his delight from boyhood. His 
early literary education was acquired in the 
schools of Jo Daviess county, and later he 
entered Mt. Carroll Collegiate Institute, 
and subsequently was a student of languages 



in Beloit College, under the tutorage of 
Professor Emerson, and a Greek professor, 
a native of Smyrna. When eighteen years 
of age he began teaching in Jo Daviess 
county, using the money thus earned to pre- 
pare for the ministry. While in Beloit 
College he received a call to teach in 
Elizabeth, and there remained for one year. 
At the age of nineteen he entered upon the 
work of the ministry to which he has since 
devoted his life. Joining the Rock River 
conference in 1854, he was first assigned to 
the church at Twelve Mile Grove, Stephen- 
son county, Illinois, where he remained one 
year, then spent two years in Pleasant Val- 
ley. He had charge of a mission in Savan- 
nah, Illinois, for two years, after which he 
was pastor of the churches in Elizabeth, 
Cedarville and Belvidere in turn. 

On leaving the latter place Rev. Atchi- 
son became chaplain of the Forty-fifth Illi- 
nois Infantry and went with Sherman on 
the celebrated march to the sea and through 
the Carolinas. After the war, in the fall of 
1865, he came to Elgin as pastor of the 
First Methodist church, continuing in that 
place for three years, during which time the 
house of worship was erected. For three 
years he filled the pulpit of his church in 
Kankakee and for a similar period was pas- 
tor of the church in Aurora, and spent one 
year in Oak Park, Illinois. After three 
years passed in Waukegan, he was called to 
Sterling, and afterward filled the pulpits of 
the churches in Princeton, Sycamore and 
Galena. For four years he continued to 
minister to the spiritual needs of the people 
of Galena, and then assumed a superanu- 
ated relation with the church, since which 
time he has acted as supply at different 
points. On the 4th of April, 1897, he was 
appointed chaplain of the Illinois Northern 



334 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Hospital for the Insane at Elgin, and 
preaches there each Sunday. 

On the 3d of January, 1855, Mr. Atchi- 
son married Miss Hannah Jennie Cook, 
daughterof John and Martha (Bennett) Cook, 
natives of England, who came to the United 
States in 1834, locating near Galena, Jo 
Daviess county, where they remained some 
years, when they moved to Iowa where their 
death occurred. Six sons and two daugh- 
ters have been born of this union: John E., 
of Atchison, Kansas, married Emma Pearl 
Solomon and had three children, Frederick, 
William and George; Wilbur F., now pas- 
tor of the Methodist church of Woodlawn, 
married Rena Michaels, dean of the 
Woman's College, at Evanston; Florence 
Josephine resides at home; Hugh D. is a 
minister of the Methodist church at Wil- 
mette, Illinois; Howard H. died at the age 
of three years; George B. is a dentist of 
Elgin; Nellie C. died at the age of three 
months; and Robert Hall Bruce completes 
the family. 

Rev. Atchison is a member of the An- 
cient Order United Workmen and of Vet- 
eran post, No. 49, G. A. R. In politics he 
has been a stanch Republican since casting 
his first presidential vote for Fremont. 
He has always been a strong and popular 
pulpit orator, standing high in the councils 
of his church, and his life has been perme- 
ated with the noblest principles and pur- 
poses known to humanity. 



WILLIAM C. KIMBALL, deceased, was 
for many years one of the best known 
and most highly respected citizens of Elgin. 
He was a native of Groton, New Hamp- 
shire, born February 17, 1806, and was the 
son of Joseph and Nancy (Currier) Kimball, 



also natives of the Granite state. They 
were the parents of six children, two sons 
and four daughters. With a view of bet- 
tering his condition in life and giving his 
children better opportunities for advance- 
ment, Joseph Kimball made a trip west, 
and, after looking around, decided to make 
Kane county his future home. In 1835 he 
started back east for his family, but died 
while passing through Ohio. His son, Sam- 
uel, who came with him to Kane county, 
remained here while his father went back, 
and shortly after the death of the latter, the 
remainder of the family, save our subject, 
joined him, making Elgin their home. The 
daughters were Nancy Currier, who married 
Alden V. Hills; Laura, widow of Asa Smith, 
and a resident of St. Louis; May Carter, 
now Mrs. Bartlett Adams, of St. Louis; 
Mrs. Ruth Ann Thiers, of Elgin; and Su- 
sanna Clement, who married Hiram George. 
William C. Kimball grew to manhood in 
his native state, and was educated in the 
public schools of Groton. In 1835 he mar- 
aied Caroline Willard, daughter of William 
R. and Eleanor (Mann) Willard. From 
Groton, New Hampshire, he removed to 
Sherbrooke, Canada, where he engaged in 
mercantile business for a time, but in 1837 
sold out and came to Elgin, Illinois, and 
purchased a large tract of land, but turned 
his attention principally to the mercantile 
business, opening a store and for years 
being successfully engaged in trade. The 
country was then new and his trade ex- 
tended for many miles in each direction. 
He later erected a flouring mill, which was 
called the Waverly Mill, and which is now 
owned and operated by the Stewart Broth- 
ers. This was the first mill erected in this 
part of the country and its patrons came 
from far and near. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



335 



The next venture of Mr. Kimball was 
the erection of a hotel which was given the 
name of Waverly house. Previous to its 
erection he lived over his store, but on the 
completion of the hotel he moved into it, 
and for some years served as landlord in ad- 
dition to his other business. With his 
brother Samuel, he purchased large tracts of 
land on the west side of the river, which he 
sold off in parcels from time to time. 

In 1856 Mr. Kimball met with some re- 
verses in his business interests in Elgin, and 
later lost quite heavily in operating some of 
the lead mines of Missouri, the ore not 
being as extensive as anticipated. His re- 
verses, however, did not cripple to any ex- 
tent his milling business, which he continued 
until his death. His business interests 
were of such a nature as to require a large 
number of employees, and his trade was for 
many years very large. His name was a 
household word, and he was known far and 
near for his good deeds and his charity. 
He had a soul that sympathized with those 
in distress and would do all in his power for 
their relief. 

In his political belief, Mr. Kimball was 
a stanch Democrat, and was ever ready 
with time and money to advance the inter- 
ests of his party, though he never cared for 
official position. On the urgent solicitation 
of friends he ran for mayor of Elgin and was 
duly elected, serving one term in a satisfac- 
tory manner. He was a great admirer of 
Stephen A. Douglas, the "Little Giant," 
and followed his lead through the stormy 
political career of that statesman. Like 
his great leader, when the question came up 
for final settlement as to whether the union 
of states should be maintained, he sunk the 
partisan in the patriot and unhesitatingly 
declared for the union. While not in the 



service, his sympathies were with those en- 
gaged in putting down the rebellion. 

In his religious views Mr. Kimball was 
a Universalist, believing in the fatherhood 
of God, and brotherhood of man, and that 
while man might stray from the paths of 
virtue and right, a just God was always 
ready to welcome the return of the prodigal 
and receive him again in favor. His wife 
believed with him in these great views and 
was likewise a member of the Universalist 
church. 

After a long and useful life, Mr. Kimball 
was called to his reward May 5, 1875, and 
his body was laid to rest in the beautiful 
cemetery at Elgin. The city council of 
Elgin, on the announcement of his death, 
passed the following complimentary pre- 
amble and resolutions: 

WHEREAS, this council has learned of 
the death of one of the oldest and most 
highly esteemed citizens, an honored ex- 
mayor of the city, and wishing to express 
our feelings and the sense of the people 
upon the sad event; therefore 

Resolved, That in the death of William 
C. Kimball, the city has lost an honored 
and highly respected citizen, whose private 
and public record was characterized by in- 
dustry, purity and generosity. 

Resolved, That, as a fit expression of 
our feelings and a slight honor to his mem- 
ory, this council attend the funeral in a 
body. 

Resolved, That the business men of the 
city be requested, as a further mark of re- 
spect, to close their places of business at 
the hour appointed for the funeral, to re- 
main closed for the space of one hour. 

Resolved, That we tender to the family 
of the deceased, our heartfelt sympathy at 
the great loss which has overtaken them. 



336 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



The resolutions were ordered spread 
upon the records of the council and an en- 
grossed copy furnished the widow and pub- 
lished in the city papers. Mrs. Kimball 
survived her husband some years, dying 
January 3, 1883. They were the parents 
of seven children: William, who died young; 
Leonidas, who also died young; Eugene, 
who died at the age of seventeen years; 
Ernma and Ella, twins, the latter being the 
wife of John J. Williford, and residing in 
Anna, Illinois; Anna, who died in child- 
hood; and Charles W., who lives in Elgin. 

Emma Kimball grew to womanhood in 
Elgin and was educated in its public schools. 
On the 25th of June, 1863, she married 
Charles J. Hawkins, a native of Cayuga 
county, New York, and a son of Joseph and 
Lucy (Adams) Hawkins. To them have 
been born five children: Frank J., who is 
now operating the home farm, married Rose 
Grove, and has two children Morris and 
Mabel; William J. and Morris B. are at 
home; Lucy died at the age of one year; 
and Ella W. is at home. 

On the discovery of gold in California, 
Mr. Hawkins, though quite young, started 
to the new Eldorado, and is numbered 
among the '49ers. His experience going 
and coming and his life in that rich field can 
never be forgotten. On his return, about 
four years later, he went to his home in 
Genoa, New York, where he engaged in 
farming until he came west in 1857, settled 
in Elgin, and engaged in the business of 
loaning money for several years. In 1869 
he purchased the farm in Cook county, near 
Elgin, consisting of about three hundred 
and twelve acres, where he has since re- 
sided, and for a number of years gave a part 
of his time to its cultivation. He is now 
living retired. Politically he is a stanch 



Democrat. Religiously Mrs. Hawkins is a 
Universalist. Like her father she is hon- 
ored and respected by a large circle of friends 
and acquaintances, who appreciate her lov- 
ing kindness and many acts of true Christian 
charity. A life-long resident of Elgin and 
vicinity, she has witnessed with pride its 
growth and prosperity. The poor have al- 
ways had in her a true friend, and many 
sacrifices has she made to alleviate the suf- 
ferings of others. 



FRANK W. JOSLYN, the efficient state's 
attorney for Kane county, now serving 
his second term, is the senior member of 
the firm of Joslyn & Schultz, with offices in 
the Spurling block, Elgin, Illinois. He was 
born in that city April 27, 1860, and is the 
son of Edward S. and Jennie (Padelford) 
Joslyrl,' the former a native of New York 
and the latter of Massachusetts. 

Edward S. Joslyn was by profession a 
lawyer, and in 1835, when but seven years 
of age, was brought by his parents to Mc- 
Henry county, Illinois, where he grew to 
manhood. His primary education was ob- 
tained In the subscription schools of Mc T 
Henry county. When fifteen years of age 
he went into a blacksmith shop to learn the 
trade, and there continued for five years. 
He then took a course in Elgin Academy, 
later read law in the office of Paul R. 
Wright, and after examination was admitted 
to the bar. Like all attorneys of an early 
day, he mixed politics with his legal business, 
and in 1856 stumped the state for Fremont, 
the first presidential candidate of the Re- 
publican party. For some cause, in 1859 
he endorsed the views of Stephen A. Doug- 
las, and was known as a Douglas Democrat 
during the remainder of his life. 



UBKARY 
0* 1HE 

Of 1U1N01S. 




FRANK W. JOSLYN. 




COL. E. S. JOSLYN. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



34' 



Like his lamented leader, Edward S. 
Joslyn was a strong Union man, and when 
the south attempted to secede he took up 
arms in defense of the Union. He was 
first commissioned captain of Company A, 
Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, which 
was the first company of the first regiment 
from Illinois, with which he served six 
months. Resigning his commission, he 
came home and assisted in organizing the 
Thirty-sixth Regiment of Illinois Infantry, 
and was commissioned lieutenant-colonel. 
With his regiment went to the front, and 
was actively engaged until the battle of Pei''. 
Ridge, where he was wounded. Soon after 
the battle, and on account of his wound, 
and also from having contracted dysentery, 
he received a furlough and returned to his 
home in Elgin. His health not being re- 
stored as soon as anticipated, he tendered 
his resignation. His bravery being recog- 
nized by his superior officers, the resigna- 
tion was not accepted, but the time of his 
furlough was extended. This extension was 
made several times with the hope that he 
could return to his post of duty, brave men 
and efficient officers being then in great de- 
mand. On the statement of his physician, 
his resignation was finally, but reluctantly, 
received, and his discharge granted in the 
fall of 1862. 

It was some time, however, before he 
regained his usual health. In the meantime 
he gradually resumed his law practice, and 
for many years was recognized as one of the 
ablest criminal lawyers in Illinois, and as a 
general practitioner had few superiors. 
Among the most noted cases in which he 
figured was that of the Emma mine case in 
Utah, involving some three million dollars, 
which he won for his clients. 

As an orator, his reputation extended 

16 



far and wide. While in Utah obtaining 
evidence in the case just mentioned, he 
dressed as a mountaineer, in buckskin 
breeches, jacket, wore a sombrero hat, and 
went in and out among the natives as one 
of them. His oratorical ability was soon 
discovered, and was often called upon for a 
speech, and responding spoke upon various 
subjects to the edification of all. By the 
citizens of that region he was dubbed "the 
old man eloquent of the mountains. " While 
there he defended the accused in two mur- 
der cases, winning them both. At home he 
was often called upon on short notice for a 
speech, and it mattered not what the sub- 
ject, he Was, always ready. His imitative 
powers were great, and few were the public 
men but what he could imitate their style of 
speech. His speeches always abounded in 
apt illustrations, bright witicisms, and 
caught the crowd. 

As a citizen he was at all times progress- 
ive and devoted much time to advancing the 
material interests of his adopted city. For 
a number of years he served as alderman 
and for two terms was mayor of Elgin. A 
friend of education he helped establish the 
free school system for the state. Relig-. 
iously he was a Baptist, of which church his 
wife is also a member. His death occurred 
at the age of fifty-eight years, and his loss 
was felt most deeply, not alone by his good 
wife, who still survives him, but by many 
friends throughout the county who knew his 
worth as a lawyer and as a man. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
Lindsey Joslyn, was a native of Vermont, of 
English origin. In early life he followed 
farming and the millwright trade. About 
1858 he came to Kane county, where he 
practiced law and served as justice of the 
peace some years. He was better known 



342 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



among the settlers of Crystal Lake and 
around Woodstock, McHenry county, where 
he lived many years. His death occurred 
in Elgin, when seventy-three years of age. 

The maternal grandfather, Rodolphus 
W. Padelford, was born at Savoy, Berk- 
shire county, Massachusetts, in 1806, and 
came west in 1842, locating in Elgin. He 
was of English descent, a descendant of 
Jonathan Padelford, who came across the 
water in a very early day. In early life he 
followed farming, but learning the daguer- 
reotype business he established the first gal- 
lery in Elgin, and followed that profession 
until 1866, when he was burned out. A 
friend of liberty, while residing in Buffalo, 
New York, he conducted a station on the 
underground railroad, and many a poor 
colored person owed his liberty to Mr. Pa- 
delford's watchful care. Owen Lovejoy, 
Wendell Phillips and other noted abolition- 
ists were numbered among his personal 
friends. 

Few men were ever better known in 
Kane county than Adolphus Padelford. On 
the organization of the city of Elgin in 1854, 
he was elected its first city clerk, and con- 
tinued in that office for twenty years consec- 
utively. In 1866 he was elected clerk of 
the city court of Elgin, and served as such 
until 1889. In 1886 he was elected police 
magistrate of Elgin and held that office two 
terms. A strong Baptist, he was clerk of 
the Baptist Association of Illinois from 1850 
until ,his death, and was clerk of the First 
Baptist church of Elgin for over forty years, 
and deacon for the same length of time. 
He was clerk of the board of trustees of the 
Northern Illinois Hospital for the Insane for 
twenty years, and township treasurer of El- 
gin for twenty-five years. As a bookkeeper 
and accountant he had few superiors. His 



death occurred at Elgin in 1894 at the age 
of eighty-eight years, four months and 
twenty-four days. 

Frank W. Joslyn, our subject, was born 
and reared in Elgin, and here has spent his 
entire life. His primary education was ob- 
tained in the public schools of the place, 
and his higher literary education in the 
Elgin Academy, from which he graduated 
in 1 88 1. The succeeding three years he 
spent in teaching, and during his leisure 
moments read law, passed a successful ex- 
amination, and was admitted to the bar in 
1884. He commenced practice in his native 
city and while as a rule it is true that "a 
prophet is never without honor, save in his 
own country," here where he grew up and 
was well known in boyhood and youth, he 
began his life work and success has crowned 
his efforts. Since 1894 he has been in part- 
nership with Fred W. Schultz. 

On the 7th of December, 1886, Mr. Jos- 
lyn was united in marriage with Miss Carrie 
A. Mead, daughter of F. W. and Emma 
(Colby) Mead, and one son Paul has been 
born unto them. 

Religiously Mr. and Mrs. Joslyn are 
identified with the Baptist church. Frater- 
nally he is a member of the Odd Fellows, 
Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen, 
Home Forum, Maccabees, and Sons of 
Veterans. In woodcraft he has taken espe- 
cial interest and from 1886 to 1890 he was 
consulting attorney for the Modern Wood- 
men. In behalf of that order he has made 
addresses in four or five states of the union. 

Politically, he is a Republican and for 
the principles of the party he has taken an 
active part in several campaigns, speaking 
in Kane and adjoining counties. In 1885 
he was elected city attorney of Elgin and 
served two terms. In 1 889 he was appointed 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



343 



master in chancery in the city court of El- 
gin, and in 1892 was elected state's attorney 
for Kane county, and re-elected in 1896, 
and is now serving his second term. As a 
prosecutor he discharges his duty faithfully 
without fear or favor, and has had remark- 
able success, securing the conviction of a 
very large proportion of those prosecuted. 
Inheriting the talents of his father as a pub- 
lic speaker, he makes a good impression be- 
fore a jury, and in the trial of cases holds 
his own with the best. 



DANIEL TUTTLE, a -substantial and 
enterprising farmer of Kane county, 
first came to the state in 1847. He is a 
native of New York, born in Oswego coun- 
ty, February 11, 1824, and is the son of 
Ethel Tuttle, a native of Vermont. His 
grandfather, David Tuttle, was a native of 
Tuttle Hill, England, and in 1816 settled 
in Oswego county, New York, where he 
purchased a farm and lived until the age of 
ninety-four years. Ethel Tuttle grew to 
manhood and in Oswego county married 
Rhoda A. McAlpine, a Scotch lady. Her 
father, John McAlpine, was an early settler 
of Oneida county, New York, and when 
Mrs. Tuttle was a child moved to Oswego 
county. After their marriage Ethel Tuttle 
and his wife resided in Oswego county a 
few years, and in 1829 moved to Madison 
county, New York, and located' on a farm, 
where he reared his family. In the spring 
of 1849 he moved west, and settled in De- 
Kalb county, Illinois, where he engaged in 
farming for a few years. In 1852, accom- 
panied by one of his sons, he went overland 
to California, where he remained five years, 
engaged in mining and freighting. He was 



only fairly successful, and in 1857 returned 
home, but soon went to Missouri, where he 
purchased land to which he later removed 
with his family. He there spent the last 
years of his life, dying in 1863. He was an 
old Jackson Democrat in his political views. 
His wife died in De Kalb county in 1860. 

Daniel Tuttle is the oldest of five sons 
born to Ethel and Rhoda A. Tuttle. Milo, 
the next in order of birth, settled in De Kalb 
county, and some years later moved to Iowa, 
bought a large tract of land near Webster 
City, engaged in stock-raising, and there 
died. George W. married in De Kalb 
county, where he lived some years, and 
later removed to Kansas, and now resides 
in Eldorado, that state. Joel grew to ma- 
ture years, went to California with his fa- 
ther, and there died some years ago. David 
married in De Kalb county, there resided 
for a time, but later moved to Iowa, locat- 
ing at Clear Lake, where he now resides. 

In Madison county, New York, our sub- 
ject spent his boyhood and youth, and re- 
ceived a fair education in its common schools. 
When eighteen years of age he began life 
for himself, purchasing his time from his 
father, giving him therefor one hundred and 
fifty dollars. For several years he engaged 
in lumbering in his native state, with fair 
success. He then determined to come west, 
and in 1847 moved to De Kalb county, Illi- 
nois, where he purchased eighty acres of 
land, and later went to Wisconsin, and for 
a few years engaged in lumbering, going 
back and forth during the time. In 1852 
he made a permanent settlement on his 
land in De Kalb county, and also bought 
out his father's improvements, and began 
farming. This land was located near the 
present village of Waterman, and by subse- 
quent purchase he made a fine farm of two 



344 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



hundred and forty acres, on which he erected 
a good, substantial residence, good barn, and 
made of it one of the best-improved places 
in that vicinity. He there remained until 
1870, when he rented the place and moved 
to Aurora, to give his children the advan- 
tages of its public schools. Some years 
later he sold his De Kalb county farm and 
purchased the Lawton farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres, just outside of the corporate 
limits of the city, since which time he has 
been engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 
1889 he bought the residence where he now 
resides, but still gives his personal attention 
to his farm. 

In February, 1854, in De Kalb county, 
Illinois, Mr. Tuttle was united in marriage 
with Miss Margaret Platt, a native of Scot- 
land, but who removed with her father, 
John Platt, to Prince Edward Island in 
early childhood, where she was reared and 
educated, and came with him to De Kalb 
county, Illinois, in 1853. By this union 
are four children: the oldest, John, is now 
married and engaged in business in Aurora; 
Rhoda remained at home; Margaret is the 
wife of Frank Minard, of Aurora, and Jane 
Elizabeth, also at home. 

In early life Mr. Tuttle was a Democrat, 
but believing in the principle of liberty for 
all men, he became a Republican on the 
organization of the party, casting his vote 
for its first presidential candidate, John C. 
Fremont, in 1856. While residing in De- 
Kalb county he served as highway commis- 
sioner and assessor, and also served for some 
years as a member of the school board. 
Since that time he has steadfastly declined 
all official honors. Mr. and Mrs. Tuttle are 
members of the United Presbyterian church, 
in which he has been actively engaged for 
nearly forty years. In the work of the Mas- 



ter they have always taken great interest, 
giving of their time and means to advance 
the cause. 



JAMES ROCKWELL, of Batavia, Illi- 
nois, has spent sixty-four years of a 
long and useful life in Illinois, and all but 
four years of that time in Batavia. He is 
a native of Connecticut, born at Ridgefield, 
November 9, 1812. His father, Thomas 
H. Rockwell, was also born in the same 
town and state, May 21, 1776. The Rock- 
well family are of English descent, the first 
coming to this country some years prior to 
the Revolutionary war, locating in Connect- 
ticut. Thomas H. Rockwell, the father of 
our subject, at Ridgefield, Connecticut, 
married Polly Smith, a daughter of Capt. 
David Smith, of the Revolutionary war. He 
built the home residence at Ridgefield, 
which was first used for a hotel. Observing 
the tendency of the liquor traffic, even in 
that early day, he took out the bar, de- 
stroyed the liquor and soon gave up the ho- 
tel business. He was an influential man at 
Ridgefielcl, where he reared his family and 
spent his entire life. He died there Sep- 
tember 25, 1865, and his wife died February 
27, 1869. 

To Thomas H. and Polly (Smith) Rock- 
well ten children were born: Harry Smith, 
who died in infancy; Phebe M., grew to 
mature years, married Rev. Moses Hill, and 
died March 18, 1832; William S., born 
February 24, 1806, died at sea about 1823. 
Rev. Thomas Burr, a minister of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, came west, locating 
in Batavia, where he died; David S. mar- 
ried and died in New Canaan, Connecticut; 
James of this review; George, who died in 
1865, injunction City, Kansas; Francis A., 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



345 



who died in Ridgefield, Connecticut; John, 
who died in infancy; and John Wesley, who 
lives in the old homestead. 

In his native town, James Rockwell 
grew to manhood, and there learned the 
cabinet-maker's trade and at the age of 
eighteen went to New Haven, Connecticut, 
where he remained a>bout one year, working 
at his trade. The wages being small and 
the opportunities for advancement very 
meager, he determined to try the west, of 
which he had heard such glowing accounts. 
Arriving at Detroit, Michigan, he set out on 
foot from that place for Chicago, and was 
eight days in making the trip. Chicago at 
that time was composed of but a few shan- 
ties, but he there went to work at his trade 
and in a short time built a factory, where 
he employed twelve men. He remained in 
Chicago about four years, until the failure 
of the state banks and then discontinued 
his business and came to Kane county, ar- 
riving in Batavia, in February, 1838. 

Soon after coming to Batavia, Mr. Rock- 
well was united in marriage with Miss Mar- 
garet Van Nortwick, a native of Argyle, 
New York. Her father, William Van Nort- 
wick, was one of the first settlers on the Fox 
river. In 1840, Mr. Rockwell again com- 
menced working at his trade, and for a few 
years was a manufacturer of furniture. He 
then retired from business three or four 
years and then engaged in general mer- 
chandising, in which he continued up to 
1885. 

Mr. Rockwell lost his first wife, who 
passed away September 30, 1857, leaving 
two children Frances Minerva, who mar- 
ried J. M. Davidson, and now resides in 
York county, Nebraska; and Martha Jane, 
who died in 1850. In 1848 Mr. Rockwell 
married Miss Susan Grow, who was born at 



Clyde, New York, where she was reared 
and educated. The children by this mar- 
riage are: Margaret, married N. C. Twin- 
ing, now living in Batavia, and who has 
been librarian of the public library about 
ten years; Anna Maria, living with her par- 
ents; and Hattie L. , who died in childhood. 
Mr. Rockwell is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and assisted in the 
organization of the first church of that de- 
nomination in Chicago, and also in Batavia; 
he served as superintendent of the Sunday- 
school, both in Chicago and Batavia, and 
was very active in church work until his 
health failed. On April 18, 1898, he at- 
tended the sixtieth anniversary of the First 
Methodist Episcopal church, Chicago, and 
with Rev. J. P. Brushingham and G. W. 
Dixon, took part in the exercises. As the 
first superintendent of the Sunday-school of 
that church he gave an historical account of 
its organization and progress. From the or- 
ganization of the party, he has ever been a 
stanch Republican. For more than sixty 
years he has gone in and out among the peo- 
ple of Batavia, and is one of the oldest and 
honored citizens, well-known throughout 
Kane and adjoining counties. The poor and 
needy have ever found in him a friend, and 
no man in Kane county is more highly 
honored. 



C DALLAS MONROE, superintendent 
of the Illinois Creamery Company, at 
Elgin, was born in Hazleton township, 
Shiawassee county, Michigan, June i, 1875. 
His father, Hiram Monroe, is a native of 
Tompkins county, New York, and is the 
youngest in a family of three children whose 
parents were Isaiah and Phcebe Monroe, 
worthy representatives of old colonial fam- 



346 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ilies. On reaching manhood Hiram Mon- 
roe married Miss Louisa, daughter of Mar- 
vin Monroe, a distant cousin of President 
Monroe. Her parents moved to Michigan, 
where her father resides at the age of 
eighty-three years, the mother at the age 
of seventy-eight, after having celebrated 
their golden wedding. The mother of our 
subject was a native of Tioga county, New 
York, and although bearing the same name 
as her husband, they were not related pre- 
vious to their marriage. He is a stanch 
supporter of the Republican party. 

The subject of this sketch obtained a 
good practical education in the public 
schools of Owosso, Michigan, which he at- 
tended until sixteen years of age. On start- 
ing out upon his business career, he was em- 
ployed for two years as a glazier in a casket 
factory in Owosso, and for a year and a 
half held a position in the electric light sta- 
tion. Coming to Chicago March 10, 1896, 
he remained in that city until June, exper- 
imenting for the company with which he is 
now connected, perfecting their system for 
reworking country butter to convert it into 
creamery butter. A member of the firm 
while traveling in Michigan met Mr. Mon- 
'roe, was pleased with him, and recognizing 
his business qualifications thought he would 
make a good manager for their business in 
Elgin. This resulted in his engagement, 
and on coming here he rebuilt the old fac- 
tory at North Elgin, where they conducted 
operations until May, 1897, when they re- 
moved to their present large factory, built 
under the direction of our subject. The 
main building is one hundred feet square 
and two stories in height, while the engine 
room is forty by sixty feet. Here thirty 
thousand pounds of common butter can be 
converted into creamery butter in one day. 



The idea of reworking the butter is not 
original with Mr. Monroe, but the peculiar 
method of doing so is his invention and is a 
secret process. The development of the 
business is due not a little to his energy, 
activity and excellent management, for he 
is a wide-awake young business man of 
sound judgment and progressive ideas. 

In Owosso, Michigan, Mr. Monroe was 
united in marriage with Miss Anna, daugh- 
ter of M. A. and Helen (Whimple) Parks, 
the former a carpenter and builder by oc- 
cupation. Mrs. Monroe's uncle, Davis Parks, 
a pensioner of the war of 1812, lived to 
the extreme old age of one hundred and four 
years, dying in 1894. At the age of one 
hundred and two, he and his wife, aged 
ninety-six years, visited Owosso, Michigan, 
and walked quite a distance from the depot 
to the residence of relatives. Mrs. Monroe's 
great-grandfather Whimple, a friend of 
General Washington, served as an Indian 
interpreter for that commander during the 
Revolutionary war, and for his services re- 
ceived a large grant of land. 



HENRY RANG, the efficient superin- 
tendent of streets of Aurora, was born 
in Bavaria, Germany, October 3, 1838. 
His father, Adam Rang, and his mother, 
Margaret (Hoffeker) Rang, were also natives 
of Germany, were there married, and there 
the father died in 1844 when about forty- 
eight years of age. He was a potter by 
trade, and ran a pottery in Bavaria. A pro- 
gressive and enterprising man, and a good 
and worthy citizen, he was honored with 
several local offices. They were the parents 
of seven children. 

In 1852 two of the children, Fred and 
Minnie, came to the United States and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



347 



located in Aurora. They were so favorably 
impressed with the country that the remain- 
der of the family determined to come, and 
on the loth of March, 1853, our subject and 
his sister, Margaret, set sail for America. 
They were on the ocean fifty- six days, and 
had a good time, good treatment, plenty to 
eat, and plenty to see of seastorms, sharks 
almost by the acre. While encountering 
some terrible storms, no accident occurred. 
They landed at New York Saturday, May 
21, 1853, and left the Monday evening fol- 
lowing, and arrived in Aurora on Saturday. 
They came all the way by rail, except from 
Buffalo to Detroit. The same trip can now 
be made in twenty-five hours. The train 
ran slowly, stopped at about every station, 
and from Detroit to Chicago required an 
entire day. 

In the fall of 1853 the mother and the 
other children came to America, and joined 
the others at Aurora. A few weeks after 
their arrival Barbara, aged ten years, and 
Christina, aged twenty-seven, died from 
fever. This was a very sad event, and was 
a hard blow to the mother, coming so soon 
after their arrival here. Of the other chil- 
dren, William now resides in Aurora; Fred, 
who for many years was shoe merchant in 
Aurora, died in 1890; Henry is the subject 
of this sketch; Margaret is now the wife of 
John Grometer, of Aurora; Minnie married 
Fred Kehm, a wagon-maker by trade, who 
removed to Chicago, where his death oc- 
curred May, 1894, she surviving him, dying 
November, 1895, when about sixty-five 
years of age. The mother died in Aurora 
in July, 1868, when sixty-six years of age. 

Henry Rang received his education in 
the schools of Bayerberg, Bavaria, where 
he completed a course. On his arrival in 
Aurora, he worked four weeks on a farm 



near the city, and on the 4th of July, 1853, 
began working for the Chicago, Burlington 
& Quincy Railroad Company, carrying wa- 
ter, running errands, and doing such work 
as a boy of fifteen could do. The road at 
that time was in process of construction, 
and he continued to be thus employed until 
it was finished to Mendota. In the winter 
of 1853-4 he was unemployed on account 
of sickness, but in the spring began working 
on the railroad again, continuing until Sep- 
tember. He then found employment in a 
dry-goods store as a clerk, where he re- 
mained a year and a half. Believing it 
essential that he should have a trade, he 
engaged with a carpenter and served three 
years. He then worked three years in the 
bridge department of the railroad company, 
and from 1866 to 1891 he was in the build- 
ing department, becoming quite proficient, 
and a valuable man. During the years that 
had passed he mingled more or less in so- 
ciety, and served his city as alderman for 
some time, and thus familiarized himself 
with the needs of the city. On leaving the 
railroad company in 1891 he was appointed 
by Mayor Fisher superintendent of streets 
of Aurora, which position he still holds. He 
has rendered a very efficient service, as is 
evinced by the time he has thus been em- 
ployed. 

On the 28th of June, 1858, he married 
Miss Margaret Muchler. By this union are 
six children, as follows: Maggie, now the 
wife of W. C. Fickenscher, is the mother of 
four children, Metha, Paul, Arthur and 
Hugo, the latter being twins, and the fam- 
ily resides in Buffalo, New York, where Mr. 
Fichenscher is employed in the parochial 
school; Henry, who died at the age of ten 
months; Carl H. married Josie King, by 
whom he has one son, Carl, Jr. , and they 



348 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



reside in Rockford, Illinois; August, who 
died at the age of two and a half years; 
Bertha and Pauline, at home. The mother 
died January 28, 1891, at the age of fifty- 
six years. She was a member of the Lu- 
theran church, a devout Christian, a good 
mother, and did much to make a happy 
home. Mr. Rang's second wife was Mrs. 
Catherine Kemerle, native of Germany, and 
widow of Christian Kemerle. Their mar- 
riage was celebrated November 5, 1896. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Rang are members of 
the Lutheran church, in which he has held 
the office of trustee since 1862, with the ex- 
ception of one or two years. He is now 
the treasurer of the church. Politically he 
is independent, giving more attention to the 
man to fill the office than the party to which 
he belongs. He is a good citizen, true to 
the best interests of the community, and 
represents the progressive element of the 
German population of Aurora. 



ARTHUR A. BENNETT, the efficient 
mayor of St. Charles, Illinois, now 
serving his fourth term, has been a resi- 
dent of the city since 1885. He is of Eng- 
lish and Scotch descent, the first of the 
family coming from England about 1700 
and locating in Massachusetts. His great- 
grandfather, Andrew Bennett, was a native 
of Vermont and served as a soldier in the 
Revolutionary army. William Bennett, the 
grandfather, served in the war of 1812, 
and was in the battle of Plattsburg. He 
was also a native of Vermont. George H. 
Bennett, the father, was born in Mont- 
pelier, Vermont, where he married Emeline 
Young, a daughter of Rev. Zebina Young, 
a minister in the Baptist church, and pas- 
tor of the church at Montpeiier. To Mr. 



and Mrs. George II. Bennett were born six 
children, of whom three are yet living, our 
subject being the eldest. The second, 
Professor William Z. Bennett, is a gradu- 
ate of Harvard University, and was seventh 
in a class of one hundred and ninety-two. 
He now occupies the chair of physics and 
.English literature in Wooster University, at 
Wooster, Ohio. Adela E. Bennett now 
resides with her brother. The mother died 
in 1865, and the father, who was well 
known in business circles throughout Ver- 
mont and Massachusetts, passed away in 
August, 1896. 

Mr. Bennett, whose name introduces 
this sketch, was born in Montpeiier, Ver- 
mont, July 31, 1847, and was educated at 
Dartmouth College. When his school days 
were over he engaged in farming in Ver- 
mont for several years, also became inter- 
ested in the creamery business, establishing 
about thirty creameries in the Province of 
Quebec, which he successfully operated for 
seven years. That business naturally led 
to the manufacture of sugar of milk, and 
for three years he carried on operations 
along that line in Burlington, Vermont. 
In. 1885 at the end of that time he came 
to St. Charles, removing his plant to this 
place, where he has since successfully en- 
gaged in business. This is the only manu- 
factory of the kind in the state, and three- 
fourths of all the sugar of milk manufactured 
in the world is now made in St. Charles. 
From the beginning Mr. Bennett's business 
has rapidly increased until it has assumed 
extensive proportions and has become quite 
profitable. His refinery is located at St. 
Charles, and he has five other evaporators, 
all in the Elgin district. 

In 1869, in Brookfield, Vermont, Mr. 
Bennett was united in marriage to Miss 




A. A. BENNETT. 



0* 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



35i 



Harriet French, a native of that state, who 
was reared and educated in Brookfield. Her 
father, Otis French, was a business man and 
early settler of Barre, Vermont. Mrs. Ben- 
nett died in 1879, leaving one daughter, 
Clara E. , who was provided with a good 
education, and is now the wife of Rev. W. 
E. Clark, of St. Charles, an evangelist, 
professor and teacher now located in Boyd- 
ton, Virginia. In Montpelier, Vermont, 
Mr. Bennett was again married, in 1883, his 
second union being with Miss Eleanor. C. 
Needham, also a native of the Green Mount- 
ain state, and a daughter of Captain Sidney 
R. Needham, of Montpelier, who for twenty 
years was captain of a merchant vessel sail- 
ing between Liverpool and Sidney, Australia. 
Two sons have been born of the second 
marriage, namely: Edward Ellsworth and 
Sidney Royal. 

Since casting his first presidential vote 
for General Grant in 1868, Mr. Bennett has 
been an ardent Republican, and earnestly 
advocates a protective tariff and sound 
money. He has taken quite an active and 
prominent part in local politics, is a recog- 
nized leader of his party in his community, 
and in 1891 was elected mayor of St. Charles, 
to which office he has been continuously re- 
elected up to the present time, plainly indi- 
cating his popularity and the confidence and 
trust reposed in him by his fellow-citizens. 
The reins of city government have never 
been in more capable hands, for he is a pro- 
gressive man, pre-eminently public-spirited, 
and all that pertains to the public welfare 
received his hearty endorsement. Mr. Ben- 
nett is a Master Mason, having joined Seneca 
lodge, No. 40, F. & A. M., of Milton, Ver- 
mont, many years ago, and both he and his 
wife are active and prominent members of 
the Congregational church of St. Charles. 



HON. WILLIAM F. DICKINSON, pres- 
ident of the Aurora Silver Plate Man- 
ufacturing Company, but who is practically 
living a retired life, has been a resident of 
Kane county since 1866. He is a native of 
Vermont, born in the town of Washing- 
ton, Orange county, April 19, 1814. The 
family was originally from England, the 
first of the name, Nathaniel Dickinson, 
coming to the New World in 1629. In 
England the family occupied a prominent 
position and had its coat of arms. Gideon 
Dickinson, the grandfather of our subject, 
was a native of Massachusetts, and in his 
day was quite prominent. His son Joshua 
Dickinson was also born in Massachusetts, 
where he grew to manhood and married 
Mrs. Prudence Stone, nee Fuller, who was 
then a widow and a daughter of Simeon 
Fuller. They became the parents of six 
children, of whom Emily married Nehe- 
miah S. Tinker and settled in Chelsea, 
Vermont, afterwards moving to Derby, 
Vermont, where her death occurred; Joshua 
B., who removed to Mt. Clemens, Michi- 
gan, and married Katherine Lee of that 
city. He was elected first mayor of the 
city, and died while the incumbent of that 
office; William F. , of this review; Pru- 
dence, who married Judge Thurston, re- 
moved to Mt. Clemens, Michigan, and there 
died; Franklin, who married a daughter of 
Judge Peasley, located in Chelsea, Ver- 
mont, was sheriff of his county for some 
years and died at that place; Fannie who 
married Judge Porter Kibbey, of Randolph, 
Vermont, and who afterwards removed to 
Detroit, Michigan, where he served as 
judge of the probate court; Persis Jane, 
who married Edward Blackwell, of New 
York; he is now deceased, while she is 
living at Montpelier, Vermont; her son-in- 



352 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



law, James C. Houghton, is vice-president 
and general manager of the National Life 
Insurance Company. 

Joshua Dickinson, soon after his mar- 
riage, removed to Washington, Vermont, 
where he engaged in merchandising for 
some years. About 1815, he moved to 
Chelsea, there engaged in business, and 
was elected judge of the county court, and 
held other positions of honor and trust. 
He subsequently removed to Mt. Clemens, 
Michigan, where he and his wife both died. 
He was a man of prominence wherever he 
lived, and was held in high esteem. 

William F. Dickinson grew to manhood 
in Chelsea, Vermont, and there received 
his education in the public schools. His 
youth, when not in school, was spent in his 
father's store, where he received a thor- 
ough, practical business training. After 
arriving at manhood, he engaged in the 
mercantile business, at Plainfield, Vermont, 
and was there two years. He then re- 
turned to Chelsea, where he succeeded his 
father in business, and was thus engaged 
for twenty-six years. During this time he 
took an active part in public affairs, and 
rilled various official positions. 

Mr. Dickinson was married in February, 
1837, at Tonbridge, Vermont, to Mary 
Helen Hall, a native of Vermont, and a 
daughter of Jonathan C. Hall, a business 
man of Tonbridge, where she was reared 
and educated. Three children were born 
of this union, as follows: Chase Hall, who 
grew to mature years, married Ruth S. 
Pitkin, of Delavan, Wisconsin, and for 
some years was a merchant at Kalamazoo, 
Michigan, and there died in 1897. He was 
a prominent and successful merchant and 
had the .reputation of being one of the best 
business men of the place. He left a wife 



and son, Bartlett C. Dickinson, now a 
student in the Michigan University, Ann 
Arbor. His daughter, Helen Louise, met 
her death by drowning, while bathing in a 
lake near Kalamazoo, Michigan. Helen 
Louise, married Henry B. Towne, Novem- 
ber, 1871. She died in April, 1873. Henry 
B. Towne died in Chicago in 1885. Marcia 
Isabel, who remains with her father at 
home. 

In October, 1866, Mr. Dickinson moved 
with his family to Aurora, where he engaged 
in the lumber business. For some years he 
had been interested in the lumber interests 
at South Haven, Michigan, having invested 
largely in pine lands in that region. After 
continuing the business some eight years at 
Aurora, he sold his lumber interest and ac- 
cepted the position of secretary and general 
manager of the Aurora Silver Plate Man- 
ufacturing Company, in which capacity he 
served for several years. He was then 
elected president of the company, which 
position he still continues to hold. The 
factory is one of the important industries of 
Aurora, and much of the credit of its success 
is due to Mr. Dickinson. 

Mr. Dickinson cast his first presidential 
ballot for Martin Van Buren. He continued 
to act with the Democratic party until the 
organization of the Republican party, and 
in 1856 was a delegate to the first National 
Republican Convention, at Philadelphia, and 
assisted in the nomination of the "Great 
Pathfinder," General John C. Fremont. 
For several years he served as treasurer of 
Orange county, Vermont, and in 1859 was 
elected judge of probate for the district of 
Randolph, and re-elected in 1860, serving 
two terms in that office. He was also 
elected in 1860 a member of the state legis- 
lature, and, being re-elected, served two 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



353 



terms. While a member of that body, he 
served on several important committees, in- 
cluding that of banking. He was later 
elected state railroad commissioner, in 
which position he also served two terms. 
Since coming to Aurora he was elected and 
served two terms as alderman of the city, 
and for some years served as assistant super- 
visor on the county board. In whatever 
position he was called upon to fill, he made 
a faithful and efficient officer. 

Mr. Dickinson was one of the organizers 
of the Second National Bank, of Aurora, 
and was elected director, a position he held 
during its existence. He also served as a 
director of the Old Second National Bank, 
which succeeded the former organization. 
While residing in Orange county, Vermont, 
he was also a director in a bank, being as- 
sociated with Senator Morrill. For more 
than fifty years he was a bank director, a 
a term of service of which there are but few 
equals. 

Mrs. Dickinson died in Aurora, in 
March, 1872. She was a woman of great 
refinement and lovable character, and her 
friends were many wherever known. Mr. 
Dickinson and his daughter, who are rnem- 
of the New England Congregational church, 
reside in a beautiful home on Downer Place, 
where they delight to entertain their many 
friends. For almost a third of a century 
he has been a resident of Aurora, and in 
that time has done much to advance its 
material interests. Few men have more or 
stronger friends. 



pvIETRICH LAUE is one of the leading 
\~J farmers of Hampshire township, his 
large farm lying in sections 2 and 3. Of 
the many races that make up the component 



parts of our mixed nationality, none, per- 
haps, have added more to the national 
wealth than the sturdy sons of the Father- 
land. Germany has furnished to America 
many who have become prominent in the 
councils of the nation. In her fleets and 
armies, and in her works of peace, many 
have risen to places of honor and trust. In 
the commercial world and upon the farm, 
many have obtained wealth and prominence. 
The family from which sprang the sub- 
ject of this sketch was one of wealth and 
prominence in the old kingdom of Hanover. 
In the days prior to its absorption by Prus- 
sia, Hanover was the richest of the German 
kingdoms. The public treasury was so well 
filled that interest of the kingdom's capital 
was sufficient to sustain their army, and the 
peaceful avocations of life were not as 
heavily taxed as now to keep them on a 
war footing. All its sons were not then re- 
quired to spend three or four years in the 
army, and their time was not, therefore, 
withdrawn from the pursuits of peace. This 
was the condition of affairs when Dietrich 
Laue, grandfather of our subject, removed 
from France to the kingdom of Hanover 
with his parents, who were French. When 
an old man it was his delight to call his 
grandchildren around him and relate in- 
cidents of earlier times, and talk to them in 
French, in which he was a fluent speaker, 
much to their amusement, their cars being 
accustomed only to the German tongue. He 
was a man of wealth and prominence, a 
large land owner for the time in which he 
lived and one having a fine education. For 
many years he was a magistrate, and the 
leading man of Hemsem, the village and 
district in which he lived. It is related that 
it fell to his duty to find quarters for some 
thousands of French soldiers who were sta- 



354 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Honed there during the Napoleonic wars. 
During this time, at noon each day, he was 
required to act as escort to the women who 
took food to their husbands in the field, 
they fearing the troops of the foreign in- 
vader. He attained a good old age, passing 
away when eighty-two years and four months 
old, revered by several generations of the 
Hemsem villagers. He was twice married, 
first to a widow lady, and to extinguish title 
to property, of the former husband's estate, 
he gave the daughter a thousand dollars as 
a settlement, a very large sum of money at 
that time, showing him to be a man of more 
than ordinary wealth at the time. After 
her death he married a Miss Pinne, who be- 
came trie mother of Henry Laue, father of 
the sub'ject of this review. 

Henry Laue was born in the village of 
Hemsem, in 1812, and attended the schools 
conducted by the Lutheran church, and at 
the age of fourteen was confirmed and ad- 
mitted to membership in the church. He 
devoted himself to farming and lived most of 
his life on a comfortable farm of sixty acres, 
which in that county, under their system 
of cultivation, amounts to two or three 
times that number of acres in this country. 
In 1 88 1, he came to America, and for seven 
years made his home with his son near Har- 
mony, Illinois. But it is hard to transplant 
an old tree into new soil. Thoughts of 
the fatherland crowded themselves upon 
him, and finally the longing for the old 
home became too great to be withstood. In 
1888, he returned to the home of his child- 
hood, and in January, 1891, went to his 
rest, having lived a long and useful life of 
which his children may well be proud. 

Henry Laue married Mary Vogel, daugh- 
ter of Dietrich Vogel, who was a farmer in 
comfortable circumstances in Hemsem. 



The mother died at the age of sixty-one, a 
woman full of Christian virtues. To them 
were born seven children as follows: Hen- 
ry, who lives on the old home farm; served 
during the Franco-Prussian war, and was 
detailed for service at the officers' quarters 
because of his faithfulness and steady hab- 
its; Louisa, who married Henry Deusing, 
and lives in Germany; Fred, who also 
served .during the Franco- Prussian war, 
and, like Henry, because of his faithfulness, 
was retained at headquarters with the pay- 
master, receiving mail, and handling money; 
he came to America in 1882, and now owns 
a fine farm in McHenry county, near Har- 
mony; Dietrich, our subject, who was 
named for his grandfather; August, who is 
engaged in farming in the old country, and 
who never came to America; William, who 
came to America some years after our sub- 
ject, and now owns two fine large farms in 
McHenry county, not far from the Kane 
county line; and Sophia, who married Pat- 
rick Kain, and lives in Chicago. 

Dietrich Laue was born in the village of 
Hemsem, near the market town of Nien- 
burg, July 29, 1848, the year of the revolu- 
tion of the German states. He attended 
the parochial school as usual, but owing to 
the family residence having been burned, 
and the necessity of his being employed in 
some capacity, he was passed through the 
school a year earlier than common, though 
he passed all the examinations to the satis- 
faction of the teacher in charge. At an 
early age he was employed on a large es- 
tate, keeping watch over the cattle in the 
fields for several years, when he was ap- 
pointed, and for four years had full charge 
of the sheep of a large estate. The last 
six months before sailing for America he 
was employed at ordinary farm work. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



355 



When it came to breaking home ties, 
the grief of the family was profound. The 
aged grandfather threw his arms around 
the neck of his favorite grandson, named 
for him, and implored him to remain. Sail- 
ing from Bremen October 16, 1868, in the 
Hansen, the largest and safest vessel of the 
line, after a fair voyage of ten days our emi- 
grant landed at New York, and came di- 
rectly west to Chicago, the time occupied 
by the emigrant train, in which he took 
passage, being five days. At this time he 
was thirteen dollars in debt, and this is the 
start he had in this country. 

From Chicago, Mr. Laue went to Bloom- 
ingdale, Du Page county, securing work 
with Henry Harmoning, with whom he re- 
mained one year. The four following years 
he was employed on the farm of Lewis Bart- 
lett, and then returned to his former em- 
ployer, remaining two years. It is a no- 
ticeable fact that Mr. Laue remained for a 
long period of time at each place, and re- 
ceived from forty to fifty dollars a year 
more than others working for the same per- 
son. His employers could rest easy when 
away from home, knowing that Dietrich 
Laue was in charge and that everything 
would be as well cared for as if they were 
on the place. One of the secrets of Mr. 
Laue's success, was that he always endeav- 
ored to take as careful interest in his em- 
ployer's affairs, as if they were his own. 

Mr. Laue was married in Chicago, Feb- 
ruary 24, 1875, to Miss Sophia Reinking, a 
native of Ontarioville, Illinois, daughter of 
Dietrich Reinking and Dora (Fisher) Reink- 
ing. By this marriage, have been born 
seven children, all of whom yet remain un- 
der the parental roof. They are Fred- 
erick, Emma, William, Herman, Tillie, 
August and Lena. 



At the time of his marriage Mr. Laue 
had saved fourteen hundred dollars. He 
then came to Hampshire township and pur- 
chased two hundred and sixty acres on sec- 
tion 2, on which he made a payment of 
twelve hundred dollars. He then began a 
career of unusual success, which has made 
him the owner of a large tract of as fine land 
as lies in the state of Illinois. Before he 
had completed the deferred payments on 
his first purchase he bought one hundred 
and fifty acres adjoining'his farm on section 
3, on which stands a substantial house and 
barn. On the first tract he erected a large 
two-story frame house and a fine basement 
barn, 36x80. He follows dairy farming 
and keeps on hand from one hundred to 
one hundred and ten milch cows, the prod- 
ucts of which he ships to Chicago. A man 
of unusual good business management, he 
is training his sons in the same energetic 
ways. 

The family are all members of the 
Evangelical Lutheran church, of Harmony. 
In politics Mr. Laue is a Republican, and 
sees no present reason why he should ever 
make a change. He has served a number of 
years as school director for his district, 
which extends into McHenry county, and in 
the spring of 1898 was elected one of 
the road commissioners of Hampshire town- 
ship. His life of patient industry, should 
be an incentive to others who would succeed 
in life. 

JOHN A. McQUEEN, residing on sec- 
tion i, Plato township, Kane county, 
has spent almost sixty years of his life in 
this county. The McQueen family is one of 
the oldest and most respected of the Scot- 
tish yeomanry. For many generations, rep- 
resentatives of the family were to be found 



356 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in southwest Scotland. The first to come 
to America was George McQueen, who was 
born in Wigtonshire, Scotland, in 1805, and 
was the youngest of a family of ten chil- 
dren. He was educated for the ministry, 
but feeling no call for clerical life, became 
an ironmonger in Scotland. His father was 
well-to-do and owned a large farm, on 
which George was reared. The latter was 
also a farmer, as well as a merchant. 

In 1836 George McQueen sold his prop- 
erty in Scotland and came to America, and 
for three years lived at Croton Point, New 
York, on the Hudson river. In 1839 he 
came west by boat to Troy, New York, 
thence by canal to Buffalo, and from there 
to Chicago by lake. He came at once to 
Kane county and purchased two hundred 
and thirty acres in section i,in Plato town- 
ship, where the remainder of his life was 
passed, he dying in 1859. Before leaving 
Scotland he married Margaret McCornack, 
born in Scotland in 1807, and the eldest of 
a family of six children born to Andrew and 
Helen (McGeogh) McCornack. Her par- 
ents came to America in 1837 and her father 
died here at the age of ninety-nine years. 
She died in 1860 at the age of fifty-three 
years. To George and Margaret McQueen 
seven children were born, as follows: El- 
len, who married Alexander Caskey, of Chi- 
cago Heights, and is now deceased; Will- 
iam, who died at the age of nineteen years; 
Andrew, living in Adams county, Washing- 
ton; John A. of this review; Elizabeth, wife 
of James Rosborough, of Plato township; 
Janet, wife of W. J. Christie, of Elgin; and 
Mary H., wife of W. J. McEldowney, of 
Chicago Heights. 

John A. McQueen was born at Croton 
Point, April 14, 1839, and was but three 
months old when his parents came to Kane 



county. He grew to manhood on his fa- 
ther's farm and attended the public schools 
at Udina and also Elgin Academy until the 
age of eighteen years. He then taught 
school for two years, and on his father's 
death, in 1859, he took charge of the home 
farm until his mother's death, one year 
later. He continued to remain on the farm 
until the outbreak of the rebellion, when he 
enlisted August 17, 1861, in Company B, 
a calvary company attached to the Thirty- 
sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. His com- 
pany was mustered in at Camp Hammond, 
Aurora, and was from there sent to Benton 
Barracks, where the regiment remained one 
month, engaged in drilling. It was then 
sent to Camp Rolla, where it remained un- 
til Januar.y, 1862, and was in the battle of 
Pea Ridge, under Curtis. It then marched 
to Cape Girardeau, where it took a steamer 
to Pittsburg Landing, and marched thence 
to Corinth, participating in the siege of that 
place. The regiment was then sent to 
Nas hvilleand took part, under Buell, in the 
race with Bragg for the Ohio river at Lou- 
isville, Kentucky. It was in the battle of 
Perryville, and later in the battles of Stone 
River and Murphrysboro. In the Chatta- 
nooga campaign it participated in the bat- 
tles of Chickamauga and Lookout Mount- 
ain, under Hooker, in that engagement so 
graphically described as the battle above 
the clouds. It was then in the campaign 
and the battles around Atlanta. 

While in Lookout Valley, Mr. Mc- 
Queen's time expired, and he re-enlisted 
for three years or "until the close of the 
war." From Atlanta, under Howard, the 
regiment marched to Savannah, on the 
world famed march to the sea. With the 
division that moved to Beaufort by the 
steamer and thence to Pocotalico, the regi- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



357 



ment moved on to Columbia and Goldsbor- 
ought where Sherman and Scofield made a 
junction. After leaving Beaufort Mr. Mc- 
Queen had charge of General Howard's 
scouts, and was recognized as one of the 
most daring of men in that service of the 
many fearless ones who made enviable rec- 
ords during the war. 

Two days after leaving Columbia, while 
out with a scouting party, Mr. McQueen 
was riding a white horse that he had picked 
up, his own having become disabled. This 
made him conspicuous, and in consequence 
he was an easy mark for the enemy, and 
received a severe wound in the groin. 
After lying twenty-four hours in a nearby 
cabin he was captured. From this time on 
his experience reads like a romance. Dur- 
ing the time of the disorder, when Columbia 
was burned during its occupancy by the fed- 
eral troops, Mr. McQueen used every effort 
to restrain the troops and posted a guard to 
protect the residence of an aged couple. It 
proved to be that of Rev. A. Toomer Porter, 
chaplain of a confederate general and a 
man of great influence in the south. Be- 
cause of this fact the minister gave him a 
letter addressed to Gen. Wade Hampton 
or any confederate officer into whose hands 
it might fall, stating the fact and commend- 
ing him to their consideration. After re- 
ceiving the wound, Mr. McQueen was re- 
moved to the home of a southern soldier 
who had lost an arm in the battle of Peters- 
burg, under General Lee. He carried our 
subject one mile to his home, and there 
cared for and protected him. That letter 
secured for him the consideration he re- 
ceived. A noted guerrilla came to the cabin 
with the intention of killing him, but was 
prevented by the owner, who would have 
protected him with his life. 



When Rev. Porter learned of the wound- 
ing of Mr. McQueen he came to him and se- 
cured his removal to a confederate hospital 
at Camden. Here he was commended to 
the favor of Bishop Davis, of South Caro- 
lina, and by his own generosity to fellow in- 
mates in dividing the food sent him by 
friends of the Bishop, won their hearts and 
was given better treatment than he would 
have otherwise received. When somewhat 
recovered he was removed to trie military 
prison, and here the Bishop's son came to 
him and secured for him the best to be had. 
While here he saw Dr. Todd, a brother-in- 
law of President Lincoln, who was serving 
as surgeon in the confederate army. Bishop 
Davis and Rev. Porter also visited him 
while in the prison, and as soon as he was 
able to travel Rev. Porter took him to 
Chester, South Carolina. Their only con- 
veyance to Chester was a rickety old buggy 
and a condemned army mule. The latter 
was so weak that he could not draw both 
men in the buggy, so Mr. Porter walked the 
greater part of the way. 

At Raleigh Mr. Porter secured the parole 
of our subject, and he there waited the ar- 
rival of 'Sherman's army. The pages of 
history do not record a greater expression of 
gratitude for favors shown than that exhib- 
ited by Rev. Porter to Mr. McQueen. He 
traveled with him more than thirteen hun- 
dred miles, the greater part of the distance 
on foot, and using his influence with supe- 
rior officers, finally secured his parole. On 
several occasions he was instrumental in 
saving our subject's life. At a G. A. R. re- 
union at Washington, some years after the 
close of the war, there was a very affecting 
meeting of Mr. Porter and Mr. McQueen. 
The reverend gentleman now conducts a 
school for orphans of the war, both union 



358 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and confederate, and for its maintenance 
secures large sums of money from the north. 
Beginning as a private, Mr. McQueen was 
later commissioned first lieutenant, and was 
known as a fearless and daring scout of great 
service to Sherman's army. 

On his teturn home Lieutenant McQueen 
purchased from the other heirs the old 
homestead and has now one hundred and 
ninety-five acres under a high state of culti- 
vation. On the place he has erected two 
dwellings and three large barns. For some 
six years after the close of the war he made 
a specialty of sheep raising, but that indus- 
try becoming unprofitable he abandoned it. 
About 1871 he began dairy farming, and 
ke.:ps upon the place about one hundred 
head of cattle. The Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul railroad cutting through his 
farm, a station was there located, which he 
named Plato, but which name was changed 
by the railroad company to McQueen's 
Station. Here for a time he engaged in the 
mercantile business. The farm is now con- 
ducted by his sons. 

Lieutenant McQueen was united in mar- 
riage at Chicago Heights November 28, 
1865, with Miss Martha E. Eakin, born 
May 22, 1845, and a daughter of Stewart 
B. and Catherine (McEldowney) Eakin, 
both of whom were natives of Ireland. By 
this union five children were born as fol- 
lows: (i) Catherine Margaret, who at- 
tended the Elgin academy, and later grad- 
uated from the Rockford Female College, 
and who is now holdings position in the Gail 
Borden Library at Elgin. (2) Alice J., a 
graduate of both the Elgin Academy and 
Rockford Female College. She is a teacher 
of great ability. When Professor Welch 
resigned as principal of the Elgin Academy 
and took charge of Lake Forrest Seminary, 



he insisted on Miss McQueen receiving an 
appointment, and she was the first female 
teacher in that institution. (3) William 
Charles, a graduate from the Elgin Acad- 
emy and who spent one year at Knox Col- 
lege, Galesburg, married Irene McCornack, 
daughter of Andrew H. and Isabella M. 
(Eakin) McCornack. The latter was a 
daughter of Samuel and Jane (Christy) 
Eakin, Jane being a daughter of William 
Christy. Andrew H. McCornack was the 
son of William and Eliza (Frazer) McCor- 
nack, the former from Wigtonshire, and 
and the latter from Inverness-shire. She was 
the daughter of William and Isabella (Mc- 
Lean) Frazer. William McCornack was 
the son of Andrew and Ellen (McGeough) 
McCornack. To William C. McQueen and 
wife two children have been born, one dy- 
ing in infancy, the other being Martha Isa- 
belle. (4) George Stewart, who attended 
the public school and Elgin Academy, now 
engaged in farming at McQueen's Station. 
He married Jenny Mink, daughter of Le- 
ander and Marcia (Woodward) Mink, by 
whom he has two children, Margaret and 
Harry. Leander Mink was the son of Rob- 
ert and Jane (Vantine) Mink. His wife, 
Marcia, was the daughter of Robert and 
Mary (Crandall) Woodward. (5) John 
Walter, a graduate of the Elgin Academy, 
is now a student in Beloit College. 

Lieutenant McQueen is a member of 
Elgin post No. 49, G. A. R. No man 
stands higher in the community. He is 
conscientious and upiight, a good citizen, 
thrifty and energetic. 



MT. BARROWS, now living a retired 
life in Dundee, Illinois, has been a 
resident of the state since January, 1856. 



LIBRARY 
Of THE 

of -it-'ns. 




M. T. BARROWS. 




MRS. M. T. BARROWS. 



0* 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



363 



His life is an exemplification of the fact 
that there are no rules for building charac- 
ters, and none for achieving success. The 
man who can rise from the ranks to a posi- 
tion of eminence is he who can see and 
utilize the opportunities that surround his 
path. The essential conditions of human 
life are ever the same, the surroundings of 
individuals differ but slightly. When one 
man passes another on the highway of life 
it is because he has the power to use advan- 
tages which probably encompass the whole 
human race. Among the most prominent 
men of Kane county, is the one whose 
name heads this sketch. He was born in 
the town of Corinth, Saratoga county, New 
York, July 15, 1834, and is the son of The- 
ron Barrows, born in the same town in 
1812. His grandfather, Joseph BarYows, . 
was also a native of New York, and one of 
the early settlers of Saratoga county, where 
he was for many years one of the leading 
farmers. The family are of English de- 
scent, three brothers coming to this country 
at an early day, one locating in Connecti- 
cut, one in Massachusetts, and the ancestor 
of our subject in New York. 

Theron Barrows was a blacksmith by 
trade, which occupation he followed in his 
native state. He there married Marietta 
Grippin, a native of Saratoga county, New 
York, and a daughter of William Grippin, a 
pioneer farmer of that county. Both re- 
ceived the common-school education of early 
days, gleaning their greatest knowledge in 
the stern school of experience. They were 
brought up believers in the Baptist faith, 
and joined a church of that denomination in 
the town of Corinth, New York. They never 
changed from this belief, but continued 
firm to the end of their lives. At the early 
ages of nineteen and seventeen years, re- 

17 



spectively, they joined hands in the holy 
bonds of matrimony, and started forth on 
life's journey, spending nearly sixty years 
together. 

In 1854 Theron Barrows moved with his 
family to Dundee, Illinois, where he engaged 
in the hardware business, which he success- 
fully conducted for a number of years. Clos- 
ing out his stock, he removed to Elgin, and 
became a stockholder and vice-president of 
the Home National Bank, with which insti- 
tution he was connected until his death, in 
December, 1892. His wife survived him a 
few months, passing away in 1893. They 
were laid to rest in the Dundee cemetery. 
In early life he was a stanch Whig and an 
enthusiastic supporter of Henry Clay. He 
believed in maintaining a high tariff and was 
. unalterably opposed to slavery. After the 
change of "political parties, he remained a 
firm Republican to the end of his life. In 
his business relations he was ever accounted 
honest and upright, valuing his word higher 
than written guarantee. Socially he was a 
man of genial and pleasant manners, mak- 
ing and retaining many friends. 

M. T. Barrows, our subject, grew to 
manhood in Greenfield Centre, Saratoga 
county, New York, and there learned the 
blacksmith's trade, at which he worked and 
carried on a shop for some years. In Jan- 
uary, 1856, he came west, locating first in 
Dundee, where he operated a blacksmith 
shop for two years, when he sold out and 
removed to Barrington, Cook county, where 
he carried on a shop for five years. Re- 
turning to Dundee he took an interest in the 
hardware store, in partnership with his father, 
which connection was continued for eight 
years. He then purchased his father's in- 
terest and continued the business with grat- 
ifying success, until 1888, when he sold out 



364 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



and has since lived a retired life. He has 
also dealt somewhat extensively in real es- 
tate, buying and selling farm land. He 
now owns several farms, one in Kane county, 
two in Cook county, one in Lake county, 
one in Boone county and one of nine hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Howard county, Iowa, 
and a plantation in Monticello, Jefferson 
county, Florida, of over five hundred acres. 
The farms are all for stock and dairy pur- 
poses, and are all well improved places, 
comprising a total of three thousand, five 
hundred acres. 

Mr. Barrows was united in marriage at 
Dundee, Illinois, in December, 1856, to 
Miss C. L. Oatman, only daughter of Jesse 
Oatman, a pioneer settler of Kane county. 
There were ten children born of this union, 
five of whom died in infancy and early 
childhood. The living are Clara M., wife 
of Dr. Briggs, of Elgin; Herbert A., in the 
insurance business at Dundee; EltaV. , wife 
of A. C. Crawford, of Freeport, Illinois; 
Lucy B., wife of Alfred Ketchum, a farmer 
of Dundee township; and L. Gertrude, now 
taking a course of music in Newport, New 
Hampshire. 

Politically Mr. Barrows is a Republican, 
and cast his first presidential ballot for 
Abraham Lincoln in 1860. From that time 
to the present he has voted for the nominees 
of that party for president at each election. 
While preferring to give his time and atten- 
tion to his extensive business interests, he 
was elected and served as president of the 
town board three terms. When a young 
man he united with the Odd Fellows and 
passed all the chairs, but is now an ancient 
Odd Fellow. He is a member of the Bap- 
tist church, of which body his wife and chil- 
dren are also members. 

Mr. Barrows commenced life for himself 



a poor boy, working for twenty-five cents a 
day, and later four dollars a month. At the 
age of eighteen he had saved one hundred 
and forty-nine dollars, with which he com- 
menced blacksmithing for himself at Green- 
field Centre, New York. By his own in- 
dustry and thrifty habits, he has acquired a 
competency, and is able to live a retired 
life. When he came west he had about 
twelve hundred dollars, which he invested 
in business, and success has crowned his 
efforts in a remarkable degree. For forty- 
two long years he has been a resident of this 
vicinity, and is well known in Kane and ad- 
joining counties, and those who know him 
best hold him in the highest regard. 



JOEL GOODELL, who for twenty years 
has been the efficient assessor of St. 
Charles township, has made his home in 
the city of St. Charles almost continuously 
since January 24, 1857, and, as a public- 
spirited and progressive citizen, he has 
given his support to all measures for the 
public good. 

Mr. Goodell was born in St. Lawrence 
county, New York, March 25, 1832, a son 
of Levi and Elizabeth (Covey) Goodell. 
The father was born in Salem, Massachu- 
setts, about 1796, and died in 1858, while 
the mother died in Jefferson county, New 
York, when our subject was about twelve 
years old. In their family were five children 
four sons and one daughter all of whom 
are still living in New York, with the excep- 
tion of our subject, and are heads of fami- 
lies, and Levi, Daniel, Hiram and Lucinda 
are all residents of Lewis county, that state. 
About 1837 Joel Goodell accompanied 
the family on their removal from St. Law- 
rence county to Jefferson county, New York, 




L. GERTRUDE BARROWS. 




HERBERT A. BARROWS. 

M. T. BARROWS. THERON BARROWS. 

THERON C. BARROWS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



365 



locating sixteen miles from Watertown, 
where he grew to manhood.- As his educa- 
tional advantages were limited, he is almost 
wholly self-educated. At the age of sixte'en 
he began learning the tanner's and currier's 
trade, in the village of Champion, -New 
York, serving a four-years' apprenticeship, 
but after working as- a journeyman for one 
year in Carthage, his health failed, and dur- 
ing the following year he spent most of his 
time in hunting and fishing with the hope 
of regaining his lost strength. He then en- 
gaged in farming for a year or two. 

In Jefferson county, New York, Mr. 
Goodell was married to Miss Mary Orrinda 
Everden, September i, 1855. She was 
born at Clayton, Thousand Islands, in the 
St. Lawrence river, a daughter of G. W. 
Everden, who was captain of a vessel, and 
was drowned the night of November 11, 
1835, when his ship was lost. In his family 
were only two children, his son being E. G. 
Everden, a farmer and business man of 
Benona, Oceana county, Michigan, who is 
married and has a family. Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodell have one son, Ernest F. , cashier of 
the banking house of Bowman, Warne & 
Stewart, of St. Charles. He is a well edu- 
cated and successful business man, of ster- 
ling worth and many excellent traits of 
character. He is married and has two 
sons, Harry and Ralph, and a daughter, 
Charlotte M. 

After his marriage, Joel Goodell contin- 
ued to engage in farming in his native state 
until 1857, when he emigrated to St. 
Charles, and began the practice of veteri- 
nary surgery, with which he was perfectly 
familiar, his father having been connected 
with that profession. At the end of a year 
he returned to New York to care for his 
father who was ill, and while there he en- 



listed, in 1861, in the Seventeenth New York 
Artillery, stationed at Sackett's Harbor, 
but on examination he was relused. Re- 
turning to St. Charles, in 1863, he was for 
about a year in the government employ, 
treating horses at the government corral in 
Chicago. Subsequently he practiced vet- 
erinary surgery in St. Charles for a number 
of years. 

The Republican party has always found 
in Mr. Goodell a stanch supporter, having 
voted for every presidential candidate since 
casting his vdta-.for J'ohn C. Fremont, in 
1856, with the e'jtce.priqri . of once when 
not at home during the election. He has 
been a delegate to many county ^conventions, 
has taken an active interest in local politics, 
and for four years served as collector of St. 
Charles township, since which time he has 
been assessor. For a number of years he 
was also a member of the school board, and 
has most capably and faithfully discharged 
the duties of whatever office he has been 
called upon to fill, including that of deputy 
sheriff of Kane county, in which he -served 
for three years. Although not a member of 
any religious organization, Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodell attend the Congregational church, 
and they have the respect and esteem of all 
who know them. 



EJ. BOLDT is one of the important 
factors in the business circles of Elgin, 
and his life is an exemplification of the term 
"the dignity of labor." The possibilities 
that America offers to her citizens he has 
utilized, and though he came to this coun- 
try in. limited circumstances he has steadily 
and perseveringly worked his way upward, 
leaving the ranks of the many to stand 
among the successful few. He now con- 



366 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ducts in Elgin a store which would be a 
credit to a city of much greater size, deal- 
ing in wall paper and paints and doing a 
general painting and decorating business. 

Mr. Boldt was born in Tessin, Mecklen- 
burg Schwerin, Germany, November 6, 
1858, a son of Ernest J. and Mary (Hoff- 
man) Boldt, also natives of Germany. The 
former was an officer on board a German 
vessel and followed the sea during the 
greater part of his active business life, mak- 
ing a number of trips to India on merchant 
marines. At the age of sixty-five he laid 
aside business cares and lived retired in the 
enjoyment of a well-earned rest until his 
death, in 1862. He was at the time in his 
sixty-ninth year, his birth having occurred 
in 1791. In religious belief he was a Lu- 
theran. Mrs. Mary Boldt, who was his 
second wife, is now living in Elgin, at the 
age of sixty-three years. They had three 
children: E. J. ; Adolph, employed in the 
postal service of Germany, and Caroline, 
wife of John Wagner, who resides on a 
farm near Dundee, Illinois. 

Mr. Boldt, of this sketch, completed his 
literary education by his graduation in a 
high school at Tessin, about 1873. He 
then entered upon an apprenticeship to the 
painter's and decorator's trade under Will- 
iam Toellrfer, painter and decorator, com- 
pleting his term at the age of nineteen, but 
remaining with his employer through the 
following year. When twenty years of age 
he entered the German army and on the ex- 
piration of his two years' term went to 
Hamburg, where he worked at his trade for 
six months. He then again entered the 
army, being called for a drill of six weeks. 
On once more returning to civil life, he de- 
termined to seek a home in America, and 
on the 22d of October, 1881, landed in 



New York, whence .he came to Elgin. He 
made this place his destination by reason of 
his uncle, F. O. Hoffman, living on a farm 
near here. After visiting his uncle for two 
weeks he secured employment with the firm 
of Day & Fencher, painters and decorators. 
After eight months Mr. Day removed to 
Syracuse, New York, and Mr. Boldt entered 
into partnership with Mr. Fencher, a con- 
nection which was maintained for a year. 

Since that time Mr. Boldt has been alone 
in business, and has met with a splendid 
success, which he well merits. He carries 
a large and well-selected stock of wall 
paper, and has taken contracts for papering, 
painting and decorating some of the finest 
structures that have been erected in this 
part of the state. His business has con- 
stantly grown in volume and importance, 
and has now assumed extensive proportions. 
The frescoing in some of the churches in 
Elgin, Barrington, Hampshire and Geneva 
has been done by him and able assistants. 
He has taken contracts for painting many 
of the public buildings, and now has a con- 
tract for such work in the new park pavilion 
in course of construction; also a large new 
club-house at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. He 
has painted and tinted the inside walls of 
most of the Elgin school buildings, and in 
papering and decorating private residences 
he has a very large business. His artistic 
taste at once recognizing harmony in colors 
and tints, and grasping almost intuitively 
the effect that will be produced by certain 
combinations proves a very valuable factor 
in his work. He keeps always on hand a 
force of employes, and during the busy 
season frequently has as many as sixteen 
skilled workmen. 

On the 4th of October, 1884, Mr. Boldt 
was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie, daugh- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



367 



ter of Fred Yurs, an agriculturist living near 
Elgin. They now have an interesting family 
of three children: Walter A., A. Herbert 
and Hazel Esther. The parents are mem- 
bers of the Evangelical Lutheran church, 
and in social circles occupy an enviable 
position, their generous hospitality being 
enjoyed by many friends. Mr. Boldt gives 
his political support to the Republican party, 
but has never aspired to office, preferring to 
devote his time and energies to his business, 
in which he has met with signal success. 



EBENEZER P. EATON, deceased, was 
widely and favorably known through- 
out various sections of the west, with whose 
business interests he was prominently iden- 
tified. He was born in Northampton, 
Massachusetts, in 1821, and when a lad of 
ten years removed to Waterloo, New York, 
with his parents, Ebenezer and Mary 
(Stuart) Eaton. His father was a descend- 
ant of Francis Benjamin Eaton, a Pilgrim 
who came to this country in the Mayflower. 
About 1843 or 1844 Mr. Eaton came 
west and first located in Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin, where he was employed as a clerk 
in a hotel for three years. Becoming thor- 
oughly familiar with that business, he 
opened a hotel in Chicago, which he con- 
ducted for two years, and subsequently he 
was successfully engaged in the same busi- 
ness at Elkhorn, Walworth county, Wis- 
consin, for sixteen years. In 1865 he re- 
moved to Clinton, Iowa where he engaged 
in hotelkeeping and also conducted a livery 
stable for ten years. Removing to Dixon, 
Illinois, in 1875, ne carried on a livery 
there until 1880, when he retired from act- 
ive business, enjoying a well earned rest at 
his pleasant home in Elgin, where he lived 



for two years. A pleasant, genial gentle- 
man, he made a most popular and success- 
ful landlord, and his house was always a 
great favorite with the traveling public. 
His politicalsupportwasalways given the men 
and measures of the Democratic party, and 
fraternally he affiliated with the Masonic 
order, and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. In Clinton, Iowa, on the 23d of 
January, 1891, he was called to his final 
rest, and his death was mourned by a large 
circle of friends and acquaintances as well 
as by his immediate family. 

In early manhood Mr. Eaton married 
Miss Julia Harriman, a native of Canada, 
born at Jerusalem, thirty miles from Mon- 
treal. She is a representative, however, of 
some of the oldest and most highly 
respected families of the United States. 
Her paternal grandfather, Rufus Harri- 
man, was born in Vermont of New Eng- 
land parentage, and married Lucinda Dav- 
is, a native of Connecticut, and a daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Abigail (Clark) Dav- 
is, who were also descended from old 
Colonial stock. Mrs. Eaton's father, Noah 
Harriman, was born in Vermont, but spent 
much of his early life in Canada and New 
York, coming west in 1844 and locating in 
Elkhorn, Wisconsin, where he died in No- 
vember, 1894, at the ripe old age of eighty- 
eight years. By occupation he was a farm- 
er, and he had the respect and esteem of all 
who knew him. Mrs. Eaton, who is a most 
estimable lady, has a pleasant home at No. 
363 Park avenue, Elgin, where she expects 
to spend her declining years. 

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Eaton, as follows: (i) Orien C., who makes 
his home with his mother in Elgin, was in 
the one-hundred-days' service during the 
Civil war, and is now a traveling salesman 



3 68 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



for a Chicago house. He married Eva Bab- 
cock, now deceased. Politically he is a 
Democrat, and socially he is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity. (2) Edgar Stewart, 
a grocer of Elgin, is a Republican in polit- 
ical sentiment, and is also a Mason. (3) 
Dora Louisa is living with her mother. (4) 
Stella M. is the wife of Walter Bates, a 
traveling salesman of Council Bluffs, Iowa, 
and has one child, Dorothy. 



/CHARLES J. ANDERSON, farmer and 
V> station agent at McQueen Station, 
Plato township, is a native of Kane county, 
born in Elgin, October 31, 1855. He at- 
tended the public schools of that city until 
about fourteen years of age, when it became 
necessary that he should find some useful 
employment, and for about six years he 
worked in the condensing factory, planing 
mill and in other places. In 1875 his 
father bought a farm of ninety acres, lying 
in Plato and Rutland townships, to which 
the family removed. For his father Charles 
worked until he purchased the farm to 
which he has since added twenty additional 
acres, bought of Andrew McCornack. The 
farm is used for dairy purposes, Mr. Ander- 
son shipping the products to Chicago. 

John Anderson, the father of our sub- 
ject, was born in the city of Boroas, Swe- 
den, and came to America in 1854, sailing 
from Gottenberg, and landing at Boston, 
where he remained six months. He then 
went to Chicago and thence to Elgin, and 
labored at what he could find to do. For a 
time he followed mattress making, and 
worked in the condensing factory until he 
purchased his farm in 1875. He has now 
retired from active work and makes his 
home with our subject. While residing in 



Sweden, he married Anna Peterson, by 
whom he had seven children, five of whom 
reached maturity Andrew, who was born 
in Sweden, six months before sailing, died 
in Elgin, at the uge of forty-seven years; 
Sophia, living in Chicago; Louise, now Mrs. 
Peder Rovelstad, of Elgin; and Charles J., 
our subject, and his twin brother, William, 
who resides at South Manchester, Con- 
necticut. 

The subject of this sketch was married 
at McQueen's Station, February 10, 1887, 
to Miss Christine Caroline Johnson, a na- 
tive of Sweden, who came to America with 
her brother in 1880. By this union five 
children have been born Agnes, Anna, 
Antonia, Clara, and Carl William. The 
first named died at the age of three years 
and eight months. Mrs. Anderson died 
April 15, 1898. Her funeral was held in 
Elgin, and was attended by many friends 
who knew her in this life and who grieved 
with husband and motherless children. Her 
remains were laid to rest in Bluff City 
cemetery. 

Since September, 1882, Mr. Anderson 
has served as station agent at McQueen's 
Station, and has been postmaster since 
Harrison served as president. He is a mem- 
ber of the Swedish Lutheran church of El- 
gin, of which body his wife is also a mem- 
ber. In politics, is a thorough Republican. 
As a citizesn, he stands high in the estima- 
tion of his fellow men. 



LABAN HAYWARD, who is now living 
retired in Aurora, but who for over 
forty years was one of the active, enterpris- 
ing and representative business men of the 
city, dates his residence in the state since 
1849, and in Aurora, Kane county, since 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



369 



1865. The Hay ward family are of English 
descent, the first of the name settling in 
Vermont at a very early day. In that state 
Asa Hayward was born in 1784, and died in 
1868. His son, Willard Hayward, was 
born in Rutland county, Vermont, in 1808. 
He was there reared, and married Betsy 
Bradish, the youngest of a family of eight 
children of Jonas M. Bradish, who was also 
a pioneer of Vermont. After his marriage 
Willard Hayward engaged in farming in 
Rutland county, Vermont, where he re- 
mained until 1849, and then moved west by 
way of the Erie canal and the lakes to Chi- 
cago, where he secured teams to haul his 
family and personal effects to Will county, 
Illinois. He there purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of land, and commenced the 
improvement of the place. For thirteen 
years he resided there, engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits, then moved to Aurora and 
purchased residence property, where his 
death occurred in 1880, at the age of sev- 
enty-two years.. His good wife survived 
him for over eleven years, being called to 
her reward in 1892. Their remains lie 
buried in Spring Lake cemetery, where a 
substantial monument marks their last rest- 
ing place. They were the parents of two 
sons and one daughter: Henry, who for 
some years was an invalid, died in 1855; 
Mary E. married William Hattery, who is a 
business man residing in Waterloo, Iowa; 
Laban, the younger son, completes the 
family. 

Laban Hayward was born in Rutland 
county, Vermont, August 21, 1836,- and was 
a lad of thirteen years when he came with 
the family to Will county, Illinois. He there 
grew to manhood, and assisted in the cultiva- 
tion of the home farm. His educational ad- 
vantages were limited, but he acquired suffi- 



cient knowledge to pass an examination, 
and for two winters engaged in teaching in 
the public schools. He has been twice mar- 
ried, his first union being with Miss Emer- 
ancy Moore, a native of New York, where 
she was reared and educated, and who for 
some time was a teacher in the public 
schools. The wedding ceremony took place 
August 19, 1858. On the 3<Dth of Novem- 
ber, 1 86 1, she was called to her final rest, 
leaving two children Ada, wife of James 
A. Cook, of Waterloo, Iowa, and Eva, wife 
of Mr. Banister, of near Dwight, Illinois. 
Mr. Hayward's second marriage was in 
Will county, September 24, 1863, when he 
wedded Elizabeth Barclay, a native of Glas- 
gow, Scotland, born November 18, 1841, 
and who came with her father, James Bar- 
clay, to this country in 1857. Her father 
was for years a prominent farmer in Will 
county, but now resides in Aurora, living a 
retired life. By this union there were six 
children, of whom one is deceased, Clara, 
who died in childhood. The living are: 
Mary, wife of S. D. Brown, who holds a 
position with the Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy railroad; Martha, formerly a teach- 
er in the Aurora public schools, residing at 
home; George, Arthur and Charles, who 
succeeded their father in the grocery busi- 
ness at the old stand. 

After his first marriage, Mr. Hayward 
took charge of the old homestead, and for 
nine years was there engaged in farming. 
He then moved to Aurora and engaged in 
the butchering business on the east side. 
Three years later he built a business house 
on Broadway, and continued in the meat 
business, later adding a stock of groceries. 
For five years he engaged in meat packing, 
in connection with his other lines of trade, 
also in buying and handling fruit and veg- 



370 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



etables. Until January, 1898, he was act- 
ively engaged in business, when he was 
succeeded by his sons. Success crowned 
his efforts in every respect, his trade at all 
times being quite extensive, due in a great 
measure to his public spirit and the deter- 
mination to succeed. He is now a stock- 
holder, and for several years was a director 
in the First National Bank of Aurora. He 
is also a stockholder in the Home Building 
and Loan Association, the Aurora National 
Loan Association, and the Ice Company. 
In many of the business enterprises of 
Aurora, in the past thirty years, he has lent 
a helping hand. 

The first ballot cast by Mr. Hayward 
for president of the United States, was in 
1860, when he voted for Abraham Lincoln. 
From that time to the present, he has been 
an earnest advocate of the principles of the 
Republican party, and has voted for each of 
its presidential nominees. For two years 
he served as alderman of his ward, during 
which time he was on several important 
committees, including the railroad commit- 
tee, that secured the building of the viaduct 
over the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy 
railroad. In his second year he was chair- 
man of the committee on sewers, and was 
instrumental in having built the large sewer 
on the east side. He has ever been a friend 
of education and the public schools, and 
has given earnest support to every effort 
calculated to advance the school interest. 
While not a member of any church, he has 
assisted in the erection of several of the 
church buildings in the city, and has con- 
tributed of his means to other benevolent 
purposes. Mrs. Hayward is a consistent 
member of the Presbyterian church. Fra- 
ternally he is a Mason, a member of the 
blue lodge and chapter, and has represented 



the former several times in the grand lodge 
of the state. 

Mr. Hayward has been a resident of 
northern Illinois for forty-nine years, almost 
a half a century. For thirty-three years he 
has resided in Aurora. He has witnessed 
the growth and development of this part 
of the state, seen it change from a wilder- 
ness, and in its transformation has borne no 
inconsiderable part. Identified with the 
institutions of the city, and the prosperity of 
its people, he is numbered among the hon- 
ored old settlers of Kane county. He is a 
man of good business ability, of exemplary 
habits, of tried integrity and worth, and he 
and his most estimable wife and family are 
esteemed and respected by all, and their 
many friends will be pleased to read this 
short sketch in the Biographical Record of 
Kane county. 



JOHN HENRY KARL, deceased, was 
for years one of the active business men 
of Aurora, and one of its most highly- 
esteemed and valued citizens. He was 
of foreign birth, but his duties of citi- 
zenship were performed with a loyalty equal 
to that of any native son of America, and, 
when this nation was imperiled by the 
hydra-headed monster, Rebellion, he went 
at once to its defense. Mr. Karl Was born 
in the principality of Reis, Germany, No- 
vember 15, 1835, of which place both his 
father and mother were natives. The 
father was by trade a builder and contract- 
or and emigrated to America in 1850, set- 
tling in Buffalo, New York, soon after, and 
there engaged in business, very extensively, 
in contracting and building. 

John Henry Karl had attended school 
in Germany and continued his studies in 




J. HENRY KARL. 



tf 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



373 



Buffalo, principally at a night school, work- 
ing during the day. In that city he learned 
the drug business thoroughly, then removed 
to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he carried on 
the business for a time. In 1859 he came 
to Aurora, in response to a call from John 
Stout, and entered the drug business with 
that gentleman, on Broadway street. There 
he continued in active operation until the 
breaking out of the war in 1861, when he 
hired a man to represent him in the busi- 
ness and joined the Thirty-sixth Regiment. 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel 
Grisel, his position being that of hospital 
steward. After serving eleven months, on 
account of sickness, he was discharged for 
disability. Returning home to Aurora, and 
after recuperating, he entered into the act- 
ive duties of his business again, still in part- 
nership with Mr. Stout. The business was 
continued until 1870, at which time the 
stock was sold and the partnership dis- 
solved. 

In the spring of 1872, Mr. Karl bought 
the undivided half interest in the Aurora 
stone quarry, in partnership with Blasius 
Berthold, and the business was carried on 
under the firm name of Berthold & Karl. 
The same year Mr. Berthold was killed by 
the explosion of a pump engine, and the 
widow of Mr. Berthold and Mr. Karl car- 
ried on the business in partnership for a 
time, until she sold her interest to Mr. King. 
The partnership of Karl & King was very 
brief, a brother of his former partner, Mr. 
Berthold, Antone Berthold, buying Mr. 
King's interest, and for eight years Karl & 
Berthold successfully worked the quarry. 
Ever since his return from the army Mr. 
Karl had experienced delicate health, and 
in 1880 he sold out his interest in the 
quarry to his partner, and in April, 1881, 



he died and was buried in Spring Lake 
cemetery, his death being mourned by a 
large circle of friends. 

The marriage of Mr. Karl to Elisabeth 
Leppert, daughter of John and Helena 
(Baum) Leppert, was solemnized in June, 
1867. To this union five children were 
born, all of whom are yet living Robert 
Henry, Edward George, Oda Leonora, 
Louis William and Harry Herman. All are 
yet residing in Aurora, and Robert H. was 
married to Martha Swartz, of Columbus, 
Ohio. Louis and Harry are competing a 
drug store in the Coulter block. 

Mr. Karl served several years in the 
volunteer fire department of Aurora, and 
was a member of the Aurora Rifle Com- 
pany. In 1867 he erected a residence on 
Broadway, which he afterward sold, and 
then erected a beautiful home at 189 South 
LaSalle street, in which the family yet re- 
side, and also a prominent business block, 
and was the owner of other business prop- 
erty in the city. A good business man, 
conscientious in all his dealings, his death 
left a void in business circles. Mrs. Karl 
and the family occupy a prominent position 
in the social circles of Aurora and are held 
the in highest esteem. 



SN. HOOVER is numbered among the 
ablest young attorneys of Kane county, 
and although but a few years a citizen' of 
the coiinty he has attained high rank at the 
bar. His office is in the Mercantile Block, 
Aurora. He was born in Clermont county, 
Ohio, and is the son of Peter H. and Au- 
gusta A. (Prather) Hoover, both of whom 
are natives of Ohio. The father has been 
a farmer for a number of years. He came 
to Illinois, in 1868, locating in Randolph 



374 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



township, McLean county, where he pur- 
chased a quarter section of land, and en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. He is now 
living retired in the city of Bloomington. 
Although an ardent Republican, and one 
who in almost every campaign has made 
many public speeches in the interest of his 
party, he has never aspired to office. He 
favored a vigorous prosecution of the war, 
and was a strong Lincoln man. Although 
about seventy-six years of age, he is a well- 
preserved man, physically and mentally, 
and is yet strong in the faith of his party, 
being a great admirer of William McKinley. 
His wife died January 5, 1892, at the age 
of sixty-three years. Both parents were of 
the Methodist faith and communion. The 
Hoover family of Lancaster county, Penn- 
sylvania, are of the same stock, and were 
originally from Frankfort-on-the-Main, Ger- 
many. Our subject is the youngest of five 
children, born to Peter H. and Augusta A. 
Hoover, the others being Orlando J., a res- 
ident of Paoli, Kansas; Nettie, now Mrs. 
W. P. Jones, of Bloomington, Illinois; 
Thomas Henry, a resident of San Fran- 
cisco, California; and William W. , who re- 
sides at Manson, Iowa. 

The subject of this sketch was educated 
at the Illinois Wesleyan University, at 
Bloomington. Leaving college, he studied 
law with Brock & Holly, of Bloomington, 
and then taught school at Rankin, for two 
years. Removing to Red Cliff, Colorado, 
he there engaged in teaching for two years, 
and on June i, 1891, was admitted to the 
bar, and began the practice of his profes- 
sion at that place. Soon after his admis- 
sion to the bar, he was elected district at- 
torney for the fifth judicial district of Col- 
orado; was re-elected, but resigned the 
position to come to Aurora, in 1893. In 



July, 1892, he was chairman of the commit- 
tee on resolutions in the silver convention 
of the Pacific states in Denver, and intro- 
duced a resolution by which the convention 
declined to co-operate with any political 
party. This resolution being carried and 
Mr. Hoover having taken a decided stand 
in a speech before the convention in its 
favor, he was antagonized by Governor 
Waite and the Populists who were seek- 
ing to commit the convention to the 
support of their candidates. While in Col- 
orado he was a candidate for the legislature 
on the Republican ticket, and during the 
campaign of 1892 he stumped that state 
for General Harrison. While attending the 
Columbian exposition at Chicago, in 1893, 
he determined to cast his lot with the peo- 
ple of Aurora, and removed to the place in 
the fall of that year. He then formed a 
partnership with Senator George E. Bacon. 
Mr. Bacon died in 1896, since which time 
Mr. Hoover has been alone in the practice. 
His ability was soon recognized by his fel- 
low members at the bar, and he was ap- 
pointed in 1894, assistant state's attorney 
for Kane county, which position he resigned 
in July, 1896, at which time he left the Re- 
publican party, on account of his position 
on the silver question, which was antago- 
nistic to the party platform, adopted at St. 
Louis, in the convention which nominated 
William McKinley. His position on the 
silver question, and the ability displayed 
by him, in presenting his views to the peo- 
ple, secured for him the nomination for 
congress, in the Eighth congressional dis- 
trict, by the free silver Republicans and the 
Democratic party. At the convention, 
where his nomination was made, in Aurora, 
he made a speech, that was attentively 
listened to by the large crowd assembled, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



375 



and which carried conviction to the minds 
of many personsr Notwithstanding the 
strong canvass made, and that he ran ahead 
of his 'ticket, he was defeated for election 
by Mr. Hopkins, the candidate of the Re- 
publican party, which has an overwhelming 
majority in the district. 

Mr. Hoover was married August 29, 
1888, to Miss Carrie I. Lowry, a daughter 
of James B. Lowry, of Yorkville, Kendall 
county, Illinois, to which place Mr. Lowry 
removed from Erie county, Pennsylvania, 
where he had attained prominence, and had 
served as the first county clerk of Erie county. 
He came to Illinois, in the latter part of the 
forties, and was numbered among the early 
settlers of Kendall county. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Hoover one child, James Elaine Hoover, 
was born, January 23, 1893. 

Fraternally Mr. Hoover is a Mason, and 
in politics is a silver Republican, and is a 
committee man at large for the state of Illi- 
nois. He is recognized as an able orator, 
and since coming to Aurora has built up a 
large and profitable practice, and occupies 
a position second to none as a member of 
the Kane county bar. 



JAMES W. HIPPLE, an enterprising 
farmer residing on section 32, Elgin 
township, was born in Landisburg, Perry 
county, Pennsylvania, September 11, 1835. 
His father, Jesse Hippie, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, as was his grandfather, John 
Hippie. The latter dying when quite young, 
but little is known of his ancestry, save that 
the family, consisting of five brothers, came 
to this country prior to the Revolutionary 
war. John Hippie was a blacksmith by 
trade, and was employed in that capacity 
during the war for independence. He owned 



a farm which he sold about the close of 
hostilities and was paid in Continental money, 
which proved to be worthless, so all was 
lost. Our subject has some of the old 
money yet in bills of twenty dollars, eight 
dollars, one dollar and other smaller denom- 
inations. 

Jesse Hippie, our subject's father, was 
born October n, 1800, and died at the age 
of eighty-three or eighty-four years, at Ge- 
neva, New York. In early life he learned 
the tailor's trade, which occupation he fol- 
lowed until retiring at an advanced age. He 
married Miss Mary Stone, born in Juniata 
county, Pennsylvania, and daughter of Rich- 
ard Stone, who came from London, Eng- 
land, and who was an only child of his par- 
ents. He left his native land when quite 
young, and never but once visited his par- 
ents in the old country, since which time all 
trace of them was lost. Their estate is still 
due the heirs. To Jesse and Mary Hippie 
were born six children George, living re- 
tired in Chicago; Catherine, who died at the 
age of six years; Jane, wife of Israel Knettle, 
of Elgin; Martha, widow of Lysamder 
Stowell, now living in Elgin; Ann, wife of 
David R. Shively, of Chicago; and our sub- 
ject. 

James W. Hippie remained under the 
parental roof until sixteen years of age, and 
during that time received a good common- 
school education. He then went to Geneva, 
New York, and worked at the tailor's trade 
and was there engaged in business. He 
later formed a partnership with his brother, 
which continued a few years, and, being 
dissolved, he went to New York City and 
for a time was engaged as a traveling sales- 
man for a wholesale house dealing in men's 
furnishing goods. While residing in Geneva, 
New York, he was united in marriage, Feb- 



376 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ruary 15, 1859, with Miss Arrietta T. Beck- 
er, a native of New York City, and daugh- 
ter of Vrooman Becker, who was born in 
Schoharie county, New York, July 4, 1808, 
and died July 16, 1865, in Chicago. In early 
life he learned the carpenter's trade, and in 
1855 came west to Chicago, and became an 
extensive lumber merchant in that city, his 
business being later transferred to his son 
and our subject. He was four times mar- 
ried, becoming the father of ten children. 
His first marriage was with Eliza Van Dol- 
son, daughter of Garrett Van Dolson, a 
soldier of the war of 1812. She was born 
February 24, 1814, in New York City, and 
died in Geneva, New York, March 19, 1842. 
His second marriage was with a Miss Ans- 
ley, and his third one with Martha Van Dol- 
son, a sister of his first wife, who became 
the mother of two children, both deceased. 
His fourth marriage was with Miss Cornelia 
Dodge, by whom he had four children: 
Edwin D., Sarah L. , Albert and Kate. Of 
the four children by his first wife, two sur- 
vive: Helen, wife of George Hippie, of 
Chicago; and Arrietta, wife of our subject. 
The deceased were Gideon L. , who was 
a partner with our subject in the lumber 
business; and John William, who served 
during the late war and was wounded at the 
siege of Vicksburg, and who died in Chicago 
in 1897. 

To our subject and wife five children 
were born: (i) Jesse Vrooman, born Janu- 
ary 30, 1862, married Lena Peterson, daugh- 
ter of Peter Peterson, by whom he has three 
children, James David, John Becker, and 
Annie Elizabeth. (2) Gideon Becker, at 
home. (3) James Stone, a student of me- 
chanical engineering in the state university 
at Champaign, Illinois. (4) Marietta, a 
graduate of the Elgin Academy, and in the 



class of 1898, University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor. (5) Annie Louisa, a graduate of 
the Nurses' Training School of Elgin. 

After being upon the road for some time 
Mr. Hippie decided to again go into busi- 
ness, and located at Watkins, New York, 
but soon removed to Geneva, at the other 
end of the lake, and opened a store next to 
that of his brother. After remaining there 
a short time he sold out to his brother, re- 
moved to Chicago, and worked for his 
father-in-law in an agricultural implement 
factory for one year, at the expiration of 
which time he engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness until the great fire of 1871 wiped him 
out. Soon after the fire, in partnership with 
Jacob Oestmann, he opened a lumber yard 
and conducted the same until 1875, when 
our subject disposed of his interests, and in 
the spring of that year moved to his present 
farm which he had purchased some time 
previous to the fire. 

The experience of Mr. Hippie and his 
family were thrilling during the fiery ordeal. 
Owning teams for delivery of lumber, he was 
enabled to move his household effects to 
vacant property at a safe distance, and by 
strenuous efforts saved his house from burn- 
ing and prevented robbery by the lawless 
thugs that infested all parts of the city, 
from which the inhabitants had fled. 

On coming to his farm, a fine tract of 
three hundred acres, Mr. Hippie began its 
improvement. He rebuilt the barn, which 
is now forty by one hundred and forty-eight 
feet, with high basement stables for nearly 
one hundred head of cattle. He also built 
an addition to the dwelling house making it 
one of the most comfortable country resi- 
dences in the county. A good tenant house 
was also erected, a residence for his married 
son. A horse barn was also built separate 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



377 



from the main cattle barn, and a nice milk 
house, where milk is cooled before taking to 
market. The farm is now thoroughly under- 
drained, with some twenty miles of tiling, 
main and lateral. Two-thirds of the land 
is under cultivation and all crops are used 
on the farm. He keeps an average of eighty 
milk cows in addition to young stock. 

In his political views Mr. Hippie is a 
Republican. He would never accept public 
office save of that of school director, which 
he filled for six years, preferring to give his 
entire time and attention to his private 
business interests. The family is held in 
the highest esteem throughout the commu- 
nity. Religiously, Mrs. Hippie is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which 
our subject is an attendant. 



T HERON BAKER, a %vell-known resi- 
dent of St. Charles, is a man whose 
successful struggle with adverse circum- 
stances shows what can be accomplished 
by industry and economy, if guided by 
sound judgment and good business ability. 
From the early age of fourteen years he 
was obliged to make his own way in life 
without the aids which are usually consid- 
ered essential to success, but now in his de- 
clining years he is able to live retired and 
enjoy the fruits of his former toil. 

Mr. Baker was born in Genesee county, 
New York, November 7, 1817, a son of 
George and Phoebe (Hall) Baker, also na- 
tives of the Empire state, the latter born 
in the town of Hartford, Washington coun- 
ty. The Baker family is of Welsh descent, 
and was founded in New York at an early 
day in the history of this country. Our 
subject's father was a soldier of the war of 
1812, and for his services he subsequently 



received a pension. In Genesee county, 
New York, he followed farming until 1843, 
when he came to Illinois and settled in 
Waukegan. Later he removed to Bureau 
county, this state, but spent his last years 
in Wichita, Kansas. In his family were 
nine children five sons and four daughters 
all of whom reached years of maturity, 
and three sons and two daughters are still 
living. 

The subject of this sketch spent his boy- 
hood and youth in Genesee and Wyoming 
counties, New York, acquiring .a very mea- 
ger education, but his training at farm work 
was not limited. In Wyoming county he 
was married, December 22, 1842, to Miss 
Isabella Culberson, a native of Ireland, who 
came to the New World when a child of 
ten years. Coming west in 1843, they first 
located in the town of Delavan, Walworth 
county, Wisconsin, where Mr. Baker had 
entered a tract of forty acres the year pre- 
vious. Upon the place he built a log 
house, and to the improvement and cul- 
tivation of his land he devoted his ener- 
gies for thirteen years, transforming it 
into a good farm. He then sold and re- 
moved to Green county, Wisconsin, where 
he purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of wild land and opened up another farm, 
making this place his home for fifteen 
years. On disposing of that property he 
came to Kane county, Illinois, in Septem- 
ber, 1870, and bought a farm of forty-one 
and one-half acres in St. Charles township, 
on the Elgin road, two miles from St. 
Charles. He completed the house, built a 
good barn and substantial outbuildings, set 
out an orchard, and made many other im- 
provements upon the plnce which added 
greatly to its value and attractive appear- 
ance. After successfully operating the farm 



378 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



for twenty-two years, he sold it and bought 
a residence lot in St. Charles, on which he 
erected a comfortable home, where he is 
now living. Besides this property he owns 
one good residence which he rents, and also 
seven building lots. 

Mr. Baker lost his first wife December 
12, 1 887,. and in Kane county was again 
married, September 12, 1888, his second 
union being with Miss Harriet Butler, a sis- 
ter of O. M. Butler, an early settler and 
prominent manufacturer of St. Charles. 
She was born in Rochester, Windsor coun- 
ty, Vermont, and was reared in Essex, 
Chittenden county, that state. She ob- 
tained a good education, and in early life 
was a successful teacher in Kane county, 
Illinois, having come to the west in 1847. 
Religiously she is a member of the Congre- 
gational church of St. Charles and takes an 
active interest in its work. 

Politically Mr. Baker is a stanch Repub- 
lican, and has never failed to cast his ballot 
for its candidates at every presidential elec- 
tion since voting for John C. Fremont in 
1856. He has never aspired to office, how- 
ever, preferring to give his attention to his 
private affairs. His business undertakings 
have been crowned with success, and he 
has not only secured a comfortable compe- 
tence, but has gained the respect and es- 
teem of all who know him. 



LYMAN D. MORGAN, who resides on 
section 25, Hampshire township, was 
one of the ' ' boysin blue, " who, at their coun- 
try's call, went out in defense of the Union, 
and gave between two and three years of his 
young life to the service of his country. He 
was born in Coral township, McHenry coun- 
ty, Illinois, May 9, 1845, ar >d is the son of 



Lyman Morgan, Jr., who was born in Pom- 
pey, Onondago county, New York, and who 
married Polly Thomas, also a native of 
Pompey and a daughter of John Thomas, 
of that place. The paternal grandfather, 
Lyman Morgan, Sr. , was likewise a native 
of Pompey, New York, and there died when 
about eighty years of age. Lyman Morgan, 
Jr., left his native state in 1839, came west 
and settled in McHenry county, Illinois, 
and there engaged in farming, and where 
he died in 1866, at the age of fifty-six years. 
His family consisted of seven children of 
whom two only are now living LeRoy, 
who is living at Platte, Michigan, and who 
served during the war in the Fifty-second 
Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry; and 
Lyman D., our subject. 

The subject of this sketch grew to man- 
hood on his father's farm and attended the 
district schools until the age of fourteen 
years. In 1859 the family moved into Kane 
county, Illinois, locating on the farm which 
is now owned by our subject. Mr. Mor- 
gan enlisted October 17, 1862, as a member 
of Company B, Seventeenth Illinois Cav- 
alry, and served until December 15, 1865. 
He went first to Jefferson Barracks, near St. 
Louis, Missouri, and thence to Alton, Illi- 
nois, guarding prisoners. At that place he 
was taken ill, from impure water and food, 
and would have died but for the kindness 
and care of an old Scotch woman. He 
was next sent to St. Joseph, Missouri, 
thence to Weston, south of St. Joseph, 
doing scouting duty, which kept him out 
most of the night in order to prevent bush- 
whackers and thieves from depredation. 
From Weston he went to Macon City, 
Missouri, then to Brookfield and Laclede. 
For a while he was stationed at Fort Leav- 
enworth, and then sent to do scouting duty 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



379 



around Fort Scott and west of that place 
to Humboldt, Kansas. While there they 
learned that their command had been or- 
dered to Lawrence, Kansas, at the close of 
the war to be discharged. The troops be- 
came incensed at the officers for not com- 
plying with orders. The officers desired 
promotion before disbanding and for that 
reason withheld the orders. The troops 
mutinied, when they learned that instead of 
being mustered out they were to be sent 
west to fight Indians, and many of them 
deserted. Those who stayed went west to 
guard the Butterfield overland dispatch and 
the government mail. Some stole cavalry 
horses and escaped with them. Our sub- 
ject was sergeant of the guard during the 
last days and tried to hold deserters in check. 
He was at last mustered out, at Fort Leav- 
enworth and was discharged at Springfield, 
Illinois. 

After receiving his discharge, Mr. Mor- 
gan returned home and worked for his father 
until the latter's death in 1866, about the 
time he attained his majority. He promised 
his father on the latter's deathbed to remain 
with his mother. He intended to study for 
a profession, having a thirst for learning, 
and was well fitted, mentally, for success in 
any profession. His life work, however, 
was changed by the death of his father. 
After returning home he attended school 
for two years in winters, one year of which 
time he was in Elgin Academy, and being a 
diligent student he secured a teacher's cer- 
tificate and taught in the old village of 
Hampshire. 

Mr. Morgan was promised the home farm 
on condition that he take care of his mother, 
but had to buy the interest of the other 
heirs in the estate. He secured sixty acres 
of the original farm and bought ten acres 



additional. In 1871 he went to Otter Creek, 
Michigan, and went into the wood business 
in partnership with an uncle, supplying wood 
to be used in an iron furnace. The iron 
company failed and they had thirteen hun- 
dred cords of wood left on their hands, 
which was a severe financial loss. In 1874 
he returned to the farm and has here since 
resided. 

On the pth of May, 1874, at Platte, 
Benzie county, Michigan, Mr. Morgan was 
united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Ann 
Helmer, born at Rainham Centre, Haldirnan 
county, Canada, and a daughter of Jonas 
E. and Sophie (Miller) Helmer. The father 
of the latter, Joseph E. Miller, was a soldier 
under the great Napoleon. Jonas E. Helmer 
was born in Ohio, from which state he moved 
to Canada, where he lived several years, 
and in 1858 returned to Ohio. In the latter 
state Mrs. Morgan grew to womanhood. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Morgan seven children 
were born: Alice M., deceased, was burned 
to death, her clothes taking fire while burn- 
ing brush; Ora, Mabel L. , Izo T. , Ambert 
Delos, Eugenia and Lyman Judd. Ora at- 
tended the State Normal school two years 
and has taught school in the district in Mc- 
Henry county, where his father attended 
when a boy. Mabel has also engaged in 
teaching, and for three years had charge of 
a school at Old Hampshire, where her father 
taught when a young man. 

Fraternally, Mr. Morgan is a member of 
the Modern Woodmen of America, Knights 
of the Globe, and of the Royal Neighbors. 
In the latter order Mrs. Morgan also holds 
membership. They attend the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and in politics he is a 
Republican. Among the local offices held 
by him is that of school trustee and school 
director. As a citizen he is held in the 



380 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



highest esteem and is ever ready to do his 
part in whatever tends to advance the in- 
terest of his county and state. 



MOSES W.HAWES, deceased. In stud- 
ying the lives and characters of prom- 
inent men, we ars naturally led to inquire 
into the secret of their success and the mo- 
tives that prompted their action. Success 
is a question of genius, as held by many, 
but is it not rather a matter of experience 
and sound judgment? When we trace the 
career of those who stand highest in public 
esteem, we find in nearly every case that 
they are those who have risen gradually, 
fighting their way in the face of all opposi- 
tion. Self-reliance, conscientiousness, en- 
ergy, honesty these are the traits of char- 
acter that insure the highest emoluments 
and greatest success. To these we may at- 
tribute the success that crowned the efforts 
of our subject. 

Moses W. Hawes was born September 
2, 1814, in Watertown, New York, receiv- 
ing his early education in that city. Later 
he went to Baltimore where he learned 
civil engineering, and 'in 1837 was sent 
from that city to the province of Conception, 
Chili, South America, to erect and put into 
operation the second flouring mill in that 
country. He was chosen from among one 
hundred applicants for the position. In 
that country he became a very prominent 
man and there continued to live for over 
twenty years. Being a first-class engineer 
he became a large government contractor 
and built many bridges, docks, etc. While 
residing in Chili, he married a Spanish lady, 
by whom he had six children, only one of 
whom is now living, a daughter who mar- 
ried Bernardo Bambach. He died in 1877, 



and his widow now resides in Tome, Chili. 
In 1859 Mr. Hawes went to China and 
completing the circumnavigation of the 
globe returned to the United States. His 
wife having died, Mr. Hawes was married 
February 12, 1860, to Miss Jennie Rosen- 
crans, who was born October 4, 1833, and 
is the daughter of Asa and Jane (Cole) Ros- 
encrans. On the first of August, 1860, ac- 
companied by his wife Mr. Hawes went to 
Chili, where he remained until the autumn 
of 1869, when they returned to the United 
States and first located in Elgin, Illinois. 
In 1870 he went to Mendota, Illinois, 
where he was engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness until 1872, when he returned to Elgin. 
After a short time he went to Europe and 
subsequently made two other trips across 
across the ocean. 

In 1877 Mr. Hawes was called home to 
serve as president of the Home National 
Bank, which position he resigned in 1879 
and again moved to Mendota. In 1892 he 
once more returned to Elgin where he re- 
mained until his death, November 22, 1894, 
at the age of eighty-three years. He was a 
consistent member of the Congregational 
church, to which Mrs. Hawes also belongs. 
She is a lady of pleasing presence, and 
scholarly attainments, and is the only rep- 
resentative of the Rosencrans family once so 
prominent in Kane county. 



JAMES C. BROWN, whose home is at 
No. 403 North Spring street, Elgin, 
was for many years prominently identified 
with the agricultural interests of Kane 
county, but is now living retired. He was 
born in Steuben county, New York, March 
20, 1832, a son of Henry and Lois (Colvin) 
Brown, the former a native of Dublin, Ire- 




M. W. HAWES. 



vu 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



383 



land, the latter of Connecticut. While 
living in the east the father worked at the 
tailor's trade, but after coming to Illinois, in 
1844, he turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits, buying a tract of government land 
in Hampshire township, Kane county, which 
he transformed into a good farm. His wife 
died in May, 1845, at about the age of 
thirty-six years, and he subsequently mar- 
ried Lavina Gleason. He cared nothing for 
official honors, perferring to devote his en- 
tire time and attention to the development 
and improvement of his farm. In 1850, 
accompanied by our subject, he went to 
California by the overland route, starting 
from Grundy county, Illinois. On reaching 
Green River, Utah, the son was taken ill, 
so that he did not reach his destination un- 
til in 1851. The father remained on the 
Pacific slope, dying in Oregon, in 1870, when 
about seventy years of age. He was a con- 
sistent member of the Free Will Baptist 
church, to which the mother of our subject 
also belongs. Fraternally he was a Mason 
of high standing. In the family of this 
worthy couple were nine children, of whom 
five are still living: Betsy A., now residing 
on Ashland avenue, Elgin, is the widow of 
Willard B. Allen, who died at Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana, while serving in the Union army 
during the Civil war; Charlotte is a resident 
of Hampshire, Kane county; James G. is 
next in order of birth; and Lois V. and 
Henry W. are both residents of California. 
In the schools of New York, James C. 
Brown began his education, which was 
completed after the removal of the family 
to Illinois in 1844, by attending the public 
schools in Kane county. He assisted his 
father in the work of the home farm until 
the ist of May, 1850, when they started for 
California. For eleven months he remained 

18 



in Salt Lake City, becoming well acquainted 
with Brigham Young, and at balls would 
dance with several of his wives the same 
evening. He attended one wedding where 
the bridegroom, a Mr. Cook, married two 
sisters, standing up between them, the veil 
being over them all. This was a common 
occurrence in Salt Lake City at that time. 
Mr. Brown boarded with a man who had 
four wives living in the same home. Meet- 
ing with many interesting experiences, he 
thoroughly enjoyed his trip to California, in 
which state he engaged in mining for a 
year, and later farmed in the Suisun Valley 
for two years. 

After about four years spent upon the 
Pacific slope, Mr. Brown returned to Illinois 
in the fall of 1853, having met with mod- 
erate success. Two years later, on the 23d 
of September, 1855, Mr. Brown was united 
in marriage with Miss Teressa P. Harney, 
who was born in Massillon, Stark county, 
Ohio, a daughter of T. }. and Mary (Bur- 
gess) Harney, natives of Canada. She was 
educated in a private school on the Western 
Reserve in that state, and at the age of 
eighteen began teaching near Massillon. 
After coming to Kane county, in 1854, she 
taught in the schools of Hampshire, teach- 
ing boys and girls, whose children years 
later attended a school conducted by her 
daughter, Mrs. Hollenbeck. Mrs. Brown 
is the only survivor in a family of six chil- 
dren, three of whom died when young. 
Thomas, the oldest, was a soldier of the 
Mexican war, and Sarcfield M. was a sol- 
dier of the Civil war. He was the first sol- 
dier whose remains were brought back to 
Elgin for interment. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Brown were born four 
children, namely: (i) Lillie was educated 
in the Elgin Academy, began teaching in 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the schools of Hampshire township, and 
later taught for six years in the graded 
schools of Elgin. In 1884 she married 
Ralph D. Hollenbeck, who is a prominent 
attorney and graduated in the same class 
with his wife, by whom she has one child, 
Helen. In 1891 she was elected a member 
of the school board and served in that ca- 
pacity for two terms, being chairman of the 
teachers committee for three years. Since 
its organization she has been identified with 
the Woman's Club, which is one of the best 
and largest clubs of the kind in the state 
outside of Chicago. It has erected and con- 
ducts an excellent hospital in Elgin, and 
has taken an active part in many enterprises 
for the good of the city. In its work Mrs. 
Hollenbeck has borne an active and promi- 
nent part. (2) Ira J., the second child of 
our subject, finished his education at the 
Elgin Academy, and is general milk solicitor 
for the Illinois Central Railroad, having 
charge of all the milk carried by that road. 
He married Estella Wilcox, by whom he 
has three children Calvin W. , James P. 
and Harry H. and they live in Genoa, Illi- 
nois. (3) Dairy died at the age of eleven 
years. (4) Mary L. is the wife of Walter 
P. Johnson, a grandson of Gail Borden, and 
they live in southern California. Their chil- 
dren are Borden, Calvin, Gail and Richard. 
On his return from California Mr. 
Brown invested his capital in a farm in 
Kane county, to which he added from time 
to time until he had one of the most val- 
uable and desirable places in the commu- 
nity. To agricultural pursuits he devoted 
his energies until elected sheriff in 1870, 
when he removed to Geneva to assume the 
duties of that office, which he so acceptably 
discharged that in 1872 he was, re-elected, 
serving in all two terms. 



In October, 1861, during his country's 
hour of peril, Mr. Brown laid aside all per- 
sonal interests and enlisted in Company B, 
Eighth Illinois Cavalry, under Colonel Farns- 
worth. For three years he was in the serv- 
vice, participating in all the battles in 
which his command took part, and when 
his term of service had expired, he was hon- 
orably discharged October 18, 1864. For- 
tunately he was never wounded, taken pris- 
oner, sent to the hospital, nor confined in 
the guard house during the entire time, 
though he met with many narrow escapes. 
For a time he was on detached service. 
Since his retirement from the office of 
sheriff he has made his home in Elgin. 

Socially Mr. Brown affiliates with the 
Masonic order and the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, while politically he is iden- 
tified with the Republican party. Besides 
serving as sheriff of the county, he has filled 
all the township offices while residing in 
Hampshire township, and has always been 
recognized as one of the valued and useful 
citizens of his community. His wife and 
some of their children are members of the 
Congregational Church, and in social cir- 
cles the family is one of prominence. 



JOSEPH CLARK, one of the highly re- 
J spected citizens of St. Charles, who for 
nearly half a century has been identified 
with the interests of Kane county, is a na- 
tive of England, born in the city of London, 
August 27, 1837. His father, Edward Clark, 
also a native of that country, emigrated with 
his family to the New World in 1852, the 
voyage across the Atlantic consuming six 
weeks. The vessel on which they sailed, 
the American Eagle, carried them safely 
from London to New York, whence they 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



385 



proceeded by wa} - of the great lakes to 
Chicago, and in May, 1852, they arrived in 
Kane county. St. Charles was then the ter- 
minus of the railroad. About a mile and a 
half from the village the father purchased a 
tract of ninety-one acres of land, which he 
at once commenced to clear and improve, 
erecting thereon a good frame residence. 
Upon that place he continued to make his 
home until about two years prior to his 
death, when he removed to St. Charles, 
where he passed away March i, 1886. The 
mother of our subject died in England, and 
there the father was again married, his sec- 
ond wife dying in Kane county, in 1853. 

The children born of the first marriage 
were Ellen, wife of W. H. Britt, of Chicago; 
William, now deceased; Joseph, of this 
sketch; Mrs. Cooley, of Batavia, Kane 
county; Mrs. J. F. Elliott, of St. Charles; 
and Edward, who during the Civil war was 
a member of the Thirty-sixth Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and died from effects of 
wounds received while defending the old flag 
and the cause it represented. 

At the age of fourteen, Joseph Clark 
came to the United States with his father, 
and in Kane county grew to manhood. He 
had received good educational advantages 
in his native land, but after coming to this 
country attended school but very little. 
Remaining at home he assisted his father in 
the arduous task of developing the wild land 
into highly cultivated fields. Although of 
foreign birth, he had great love for his 
adopted country, and during her hour of 
peril he offered his services to the govern- 
ment to assist in putting down the rebellion. 
In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company 
E, One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, which was assigned to 
the Army of the Tennessee, and with his 



command he participated in the engagement 
at Tallahassee; followed Price while on his 
raid; was in the first siege at Chickasaw 
Bayou; took part in the battle of Arkansas 
Post, and in the siege of Vicksburg. He 
was then detailed for hospital service at 
Young's Point, where he remained for some 
time, and from March until July, 1863, he 
served on a hospital boat on the river. On 
account of illness he was then discharged 
and returned home, where he remained un- 
til he had somewhat regained his lost 
strength. 

The following year Mr. Clark began 
farming upon rented land and continued to 
follow that occupation for a few years. He 
then removed to St. Charles, where he pur- 
chased a lot and erected his present resi- 
dence in 1876, while he engaged in teaming 
for some years. After his father's death he 
bought the interests of the other heirs in 
the old homestead and to agricultural pur- 
suits again turned his attention, successfully 
operating the farm until 1892, when he 
rented it and returned to St. Charles, where 
he is now living retired. Upon the farm he 
has made a number of useful and valuable 
improvements. 

On the 22d of October, 1863, in Kane 
county, Mr. Clark was united in marriage 
with Miss Amanda A. Wood, a native of 
Erie county, Pennsylvania, who, when a 
child of three years, was brought to Illinois. 
Her father, William Wood, was a pioneer 
of Kane county, first locating in Blackberry, 
and later in Batavia, where he spent his 
last years. Mrs. Clark grew to woman- 
hood and was educated in Kane county. 

The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Clark 
are as follows: Hattie A. died at the age of 
twenty-two years; Mabel A. is the wife of 
S. W. Durant, formerly of St. Charles, but 



3 86 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



now of Huntley, Illinois; William Edward 
married Clara Bennett, of St. Charles, a 
daughter of A. A. Bennett, whose sketch 
appears elsewhere in this volume. They 
are both connected with the Boydton Mis- 
sionary School, at Boydton, Virginia, where 
Mrs. Clark is serving as a teacher and Mr. 
Clark as an editor and publisher. They 
are well educated and both were formerly 
teachers. Mary J., the next of the family, 
was for a time matron of the Boydton 
School, but is now at home; Joseph O., 
Anson I. and Ruth Ellen are all at home. 

The Republican party finds in Mr. Clark 
a stanch supporter of its principles, and he 
has voted for every presidential nominee of 
the party since casting his vote for John C. 
Fremont in 1856. Although he has never 
sought office, he was elected and acceptably 
served as collector of St. Charles for four 
or five years. Mrs. Clark, her oldest sons 
and two daughters, are members of the 
Congregational church, the services of which 
Mr. Clark also attends, although not a 
member, and to its support he contributes 
of his means. As a citizen he has always 
been true and faithful to every trust reposed 
in him, so that his loyalty is above ques- 
tion, being manifest in days of peace as 
well as when he followed the old flag to 
victory on southern battle fields. As an 
nonored pioneer and representative man of 
the community he is also worthy of the 
high regard in which he is. uniformly held. 



REV. CALEB FOSTER, who resides at 
No. 93 South Fourth street, Aurora, 
Illinois, has been a minister of the Gospel 
for sixty-one years and in that time has 
been instrumental in bringing many into the 
kingdom, and has left the impress of his 



mind upon the minds and hearts of thou- 
sands of persons where he has broke the 
bread of life. He was born February 14, 
1812, near Franklin, Venango county, 
Pennsylvania, and is the son of John and 
Mary (Martin) Foster, both of whom be- 
came residents of the Keystone state, in 
early life accompanying their respective 
parents from Baltimore, Maryland, during 
the last century. 

John Foster was a farmer by occupa- 
tion, owning a farm on the banks of the 
Allegheny river, where he and his wife re- 
sided until his death, the former in 1837, 
at the age of fifty-one years, though natu- 
rally a healthy man. When Caleb Foster 
was four months old his father was drafted 
into the war of 1812 being drafted a sec- 
ond time. His wife survived him many 
years, dying at the age of eighty-four. 
They were the parents of seven children, 
who reached maturity: Ross; James, who 
is still living in Pennsylvania, at the age of 
eighty-nine years; Caleb, now in his eighty- 
seventh year; Mary, who married William 
De Woody, and raised a large family of 
children, most of whom grew to be men 
and women, is still living in Pennsylvania 
at an advanced age; John; Julia Ann, who 
married John Temple; and Eliza, the young- 
est of the family, who married Seth Tem- 
ple, all of Pennsylvania. 

Caleb Foster began his education in 
the common subscription schools of his 
state, where it was often found difficult to 
support the schools for lack of funds. He 
afterwards attended Allegheny College, at 
Meadville, Pennsylvania, during parts of 
1834-5-6. He entered the ministry of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and received 
an appointment July, 1846, at the organiza- 
tion of the Erie conference at Meadville, 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



387 



Bishop Soule, presiding, and Bishop Morris 
by his side. From that organization he 
was transferred to the Pittsburg conference 
and was assigned to Florence circuit, Alle- 
gheny county, then Kittanning circuit, then 
Somerset, then Fish Creek Mission in Vir- 
ginia, then Harrison circuit, West Virginia, 
Lewis circuit, West Virginia, and from there 
he was transferred back to his native state 
and assigned to Blairsville, where he formed 
the acquaintance of Miss P. J. Waterman, 
who afterward became his wife, and from 
there to the Pittsburg Wesleyan Chapel. 

Mr. Foster was married in October, 
1843, to Miss Parmelia Jane Waterman, 
daughter of Lyman and Parmelia Wat- 
erman, of Blairsville, Pennsylvania, her 
father at that time being a wholesale 
merchant at Blairsville. Subsequently 
removing to Pittsburg, he continued in 
the same line of business for some time. 
The year after his marriage, our sub- 
ject removed to East Liberty circuit, 
where he remained two years; then to 
Chartier circuit, near the city of Pittsburg, 
one year; then to Asbury Chapel, Pittsburg, 
two years. While here he was a member 
of the committee on publication of the Pitts- 
burg " Advocate. " He was next assigned to 
Brownsville, two years; then to Mononga- 
hela City, two years; then back to Asbury 
Chapel, one year. In 1854 he was trans- 
ferred to the Rock River conference, and 
was stationed at Peoria, Illinois, one year, 
and was then at Canton, Illinois, two years. 
Rock River conference being divided at that 
time, he fell in with the southern division, 
and took his certificate of location and 
moved to Ottowa, Illinois, where he spent 
one year, at the end of which time he was 
re -admitted to the Rock River conference 
at Waukegan and sent to Mendota, where 



he remained two years, and was then as- 
signed Sandwich for two years and Oswego 
one year. While there, in September, 1863, 
he received the appointment of agent for 
Clark's, now Jennings' seminary at Aurora, 
in which he was engaged for three years, 
and so active were his exertions that in that 
time he raised by voluntary contributions 
the sum of eighteen thousand dollars to 
apply to the benefit of the seminary. 

In the fall of 1866 Mr. Foster retired 
from that work, and being quite worn out 
by his excessive labor, sought needed rest, 
but for a brief period only, as the limited 
state of his finances urged further active 
exertions. His many friends ill-advisedly 
counselled him to take a supernumerary re- 
lation to the church, which he tried without 
much reward, turning his attention to vari- 
ous occupations, until February, 1871. In 
that year he was invited to enter into the 
American Bible work, a position he accepted, 
and has ever since been actively engaged in 
it with most gratifying success, and al- 
though eighty-six years of age, is as vigorous 
and energetic as most men who are thirty 
years his junior. 

To Mr. Foster and wife were born seven 
children, five of whom are now living, as 
follows: Mary Emma, Parmelia A., Ly- 
man W., Ada J. and Robert N. Parmelia 
A. is now the wife of Rev. W. H. Burns, 
D. D., of Oak Park, Cook county, Illinois. 
Mr. Foster is the oldest member, as well as 
being the oldest man, on the board of trus- 
tees of Jennings seminary, and has been 
trustee a longer period than any man ever 
connected with the position. He is widely 
known and respected by all who have the 
pleasure of his acquaintance, and he pos- 
sesses a wonderful retentive memory of 
people and events of the past, and his mind 



388 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



is no less active on those of the present. A 
good conversationalist, genial and pleasant 
with all, he finds pleasure in his work and 
health in the active exercise pertaining 
thereto. At his own request his relation to 
the conference is now that of superanuate. 
In politics he is a Republican. 



DUANE B. BALDWIN, a farmer re- 
siding on section 24, Hampshire town- 
ship, traces his ancestry back to Joseph 
and Elizabeth Baldwin, his great, great- 
grandparents, who were natives of New 
England, the former dying January 9, 1808, 
at the age of seventy-nine years, and the 
latter March 13, 1808, at the age of sixty 
years. Their son, Thomas Baldwin, was 
born in April, 1784, probably in Connecti- 
cut. He was a blacksmith and tool-maker 
by trade, and during dull seasons of the 
year would take his tools that he had manu- 
factured and sell them through the coun- 
try. On the 1 9th of April, 1817, in Con- 
necticut, he married Polly Lanfear, who 
was born in 1798, and who was the daugh- 
ter of John and Mary Lanfear. Shortly 
after their marriage they moved to Dorset, 
Vermont, where he died July 4, 1854, 
she surviving him, dying in 1872. 

Lucian Baldwin, son of Thomas and 
Polly Baldwin, was born at Dorset, Ver- 
mont, March 29, 1819. He there grew to 
manhood and married Maria J. Lanfear in 
May, 1843. She was born at Ticonderoga, 
New York, and in childhood made the old 
fort a playground. Her father, David Lan- 
fear, was a soldier in the war of 1812. He 
married a Miss Phillips and came west with 
Mr. Baldwin, later went to California, 
where he died in 1870, at the residence of 
a daughter. Lucian Baldwin came to Kane 



county, Illinois, in July, 1843, and settled 
on the farm now owned by our subject. It 
was all in timber at the time, and he 
cleared the land, split rails to fence it, built 
the log house in which our subject was 
born, there lived for some twenty years, 
and, in 1872, built the present large frame 
house. He died January 29, 1889. To 
Lucian and Maria J. Baldwin, four chil- 
dren were born Charles H., who lives at 
Pingree Grove; Duane B. , our subject; 
Ella J., wife of Scott Phillips, an employee 
of the watch factory in Elgin; and Anna 
M., wife of Silas E. Crane, a carpenter 
living on section 25, Hampshire township. 
Duane B. Baldwin, was born on the farm 
on which he now resides, November 22, 
1849. His education was obtained in the 
district schools of Hampshire township, sup- 
plemented by two terms at the Elgin Acad- 
emy. The first school he attended was in 
an old log house with puncheon floor and 
puncheon benches. He attended school 
until about nineteen years old, in the mean- 
time assisting in the cultivation of the 
home farm. In 1869 he took charge of the 
farm, and continued its cultivation until 
1873, with the exception of a short time 
in 1870, when he operated a sawmill in 
Kansas City, Missouri. In 1873, ne went 
to California and at Truckee, Nevada coun- 
ty, engaged in the lumber and wood busi- 
ness. He remained in California until 
1876, a part of which time he was working 
in the interest of the Bank of California, 
getting out timber and lumber at Virginia 
City. Returning home, from 1876 to 1891, 
he was engaged in farming, then moved to 
the village of Hampshire, where he en- 
gaged in cultivating land near there, and 
also in bailing hay and other occupations. 
On the ist of March, 1898, he returned to 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



389 



the home farm which comprises one hun- 
dred and sixteen acres, and is used for 
dairy purposes. He keeps about twenty- 
five head of cows and ships the product to 
Chicago. 

Mr. Baldwin has been twice married, 
first in Elgin, February 11, 1879, to Mi ss 
Etta Allen, daughter of John A. and Pa- 
tience (Bowen) Allen, by whom he had one 
child, Emory D., who is with a relative op- 
erating a steamer on Lake Michigan. The 
second marriage of our subject was at Co- 
lumbiana, Ohio, December 30, 1885, when 
he wedded Verana Sinsel, a -daughter of 
Henry and Caroline Sinsel. By this union 
four children have been born Ethel M., 
Eva, Walter and Iva. 

Fraternally, Mr. Baldwin is a member 
of Hampshire lodge, No. 443, A. F. & A. 
M. Politically he is a Republican. For 
years he served as assessor of his township, 
and has served as road commissioner and 
school director for several terms each. He 
is a wholesouled, genial man, very popular, 
and has many friends throughout Kane and 
adjoining counties. 



/~>EORGE FREAR, who is living a re- 
V_J tired life in Aurora, was for many 
years one of the trusted employees of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad 
Company, and also a contractor and build- 
er, having charge of the erection of a num- 
ber of the substantial buildings of the city. 
He has been a resident of Aurora since 
April, 1856. A native of Canada, he was 
born in Quebec, February 4, 1821. His 
father, Joseph Frear, was born in North- 
umberland county, England, April 2, 1777. 
In coming to America, he was nine weeks 



in crossing the Atlantic. He first settled in 
Oswego, New York, but remained there 
only a short time, moving to Quebec, Can- 
ada. He married Eleanor Lee, also a na- 
tive of Northumberland county, England. 
By trade he was a cabinet-maker, joiner 
and wheelwright, having served an appren- 
ticeship in the old country. In Quebec he 
worked at his trade, and also for a time was 
engaged in merchandising. In 1828 he re- 
turned to the states, locating in the city of 
New York, where he worked at his trade a 
number of years. In 1839 he moved to 
Ulster county, New York, and purchased a 
farm of one hundred acres, and for ten 
years was engaged in farming. He later re- 
moved to Binghamton, New York, and 
there died, January 2, 1851. His wife 
passed away April 17, of the same year. 

George Frear is the youngest and only 
surviving child of Joseph and Eleanor 
Frear. While residing in New York city 
he attended St. John's Academy, where he 
received a liberal education. He there 
learned the carpenter and joiner's trade, but 
had previously worked three years at wood 
carving. With his father he went to Ulster 
county, New York, and took charge of the 
farm. He also removed with him to Bing- 
hamton, and there worked at his trade. 

While residing in Ulster county, Mr. 
Frear was married November n, 1847, to 
Miss Jane demons, a native of New York, 
where she was reared and educated, and a 
daughter of Ira demons, a farmer of Ulster 
county. By this union they became the 
parents of four children, as follows: Mary 
Anna, now the wife of E. W. Shepherd, a 
soldier of the late war, but now a machinist 
of Aurora; Eleanor L. , who for some years 
was a successful teacher in the public 
schools of Aurora; George William, who 



39 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



died in early childhood; and Maria Emily, 
who died at the age of four years. 

After residing nearly five years in Bing- 
hamton, Mr. Frear moved back to Ellen- 
ville, Ulster county, New York, where he 
engaged in contracting and building for two 
years. In 1856, he came west, located in 
Aurora, then a town of less than two thou- 
sand inhabitants. Here he also engaged in 
contracting and building for a little more 
than two years, and in 1859, went into the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad 
shops, working in various departments, 
principally as a pattern maker, and also in 
the construction and the repair of coaches. 
He continued with the road some five years, 
and then purchased a farm in Cook county, 
to which he removed, and where he re- 
mained but eleven months. Selling out he 
returned to Aurora and went back into the 
shops, where he remained about twenty -five 
years. 

Politically Mr. Frear was first a Whig, 
then an AbolitiDnist, and on the organiza- 
tion of the Republican party, became iden- 
tified with it. His first presidential ballot 
was cast for General Winfield Scott, and 
his first Republican ballot for John C. Fre- 
mont. He has never desired or held public 
office, with the exception of being a mem- 
ber of the school board for three years, dur- 
ing which time he used his influence in se- 
curing good schools. Religiously he is a 
member of the Presbyterian church, in which 
he has been an elder lor a number of years. 
Mrs. Frear is also a member of that church, 
and both take a lively interest in whatever 
tends to promote the Master's cause. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frear celebrated their 
golden wedding November n, 1897, at 
which time a large number of their friends 
congregated and gladdened the hearts. 



They were the recipients of a number of 
presents, showing the friendship and esteem 
in which they are held. The session of the 
church presented him with a gold-headed 
cane on that occasion. In the forty-two 
years of their residence in Kane county, Mr. 
and Mrs. Frear have made many warm 
friends, who esteem them for their Christian 
character. 



LOUIS A. CONSTANTINE, postmaster 
of Aurora, was born in Buffalo, New 
York, March 13, 1853, and is the son of 
Louis A. and Fannie (Case) Constantine, 
the former born about 1800, in Berlin, Ger- 
many, while his father was a member of the 
French Legation. He came to the United 
States in the '303, where he lived for some 
time and where his death occurred in 1865. 
On coming to this country, he adopted the 
principles of the Whig party, and later be- 
came a Republican. His wife, Fannie (Case) 
Constantine, was born in Devonshire, Eng- 
land, and came with her parents to Canada, 
when she was eleven years of age. She died 
in 1892, at Davenport, Iowa, where she was 
visiting her daughter. Louis A. and Fannie 
Constantine were the parents of eight chil- 
dren, four of whom are yet living: Sidney 
M., an attorney at Three Rivers, Michigan; 
Alice, now Mrs. Charles Stephens, of 
Davenport, Iowa; Louis A., our subject; 
and Benjamin F., manager of the "Post," 
Aurora. The deceased are William, Carrie, 
Maria, and Mary. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
public schools at Buffalo, N. Y., and Grand 
Rapids, Michigan. He then entered a print- 
ing office as an apprentice, serving through 
all the grades and was then transferred to 
the business office. His first work was in 




LOUIS A. CONSTATINE. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



393 



the office of the "Republican," at Dowa- 
giac, Michigan, then the Grand Rap- 
ids "Eagle," the Jackson "Citizen" 
and the "Gazette" at Davenport, Iowa, 
and the Chicago "Daily News." From the 
" News" he came to Aurora, in November, 
1877, and bought the "Post," which he has 
since published. This paper is a daily, 
seven-column folio, and devoted to the in- 
terest of the Republican party. It has been 
a prosperous paper since it was started, and 
has absorbed the "Democrat," "Times," 
" The Journal " and " Blade," weekly news- 
papers of Aurora. 

Mr. Constantine was united in marriage 
March 27, 1882, at Aurora, with Miss Lil- 
lian Loomis, daughter of William and Isabel 
(Seeley) Loomis. She is a native of Aurora, 
and her parents were natives of Erie coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania. They had three children 
William, deceased; Mary, now the wife 
of Dr. Douglas Long, of Detroit, Michigan; 
and Lillian. Mr. and Mrs. Constantine are 
members of the Peoples church, Aurora. 

Since attaining his majority, Mr. Con- 
stantine has been actively engaged in poli- 
tics, and, as a Republican, has been a leader 
in the councils of his party. He was clerk 
of the senate committee two terms, and 
was private secretary pf President Bogardus, 
of the senate. For two years he was in the 
internal revenue service, in Chicago, under 
Christian Mamer. On the 1 3th of January, 
1898, he was appointed by President Mc- 
Kinley, postmaster of Aurora, commissioned 
on the 2Oth and took possession of the office 
February i, 1898. He has served as delegate 
to many county, district and state conven- 
tions, has been chairman of the city exec- 
utive committee, and chairman of the sena- 
torial committee. He is president of the 
Republican press association, of the eighth 



congressional district, and state organizer 
of the Illinois Republican League. A man 
of action, pleasing manners and good ad- 
dress, he has many friends, not only in 
Kane county, but throughout the state. 



DR. WILLIAM A. PRATT, proprietor 
of the Cedarside Stock Farm, and 
breeder of Holstein-Friesian cattle, section 
i, Elgin- township, has the reputation of 
being one of the best breeders in the state 
of Illinois, his stock being found in nearly 
every state and territory irT the Union. He 
was born in Naperville, Du Page county, 
Illinois, October 25, 1843, and is the son 
of Dr. Philomen Brown and Mary (Grimes) 
Pratt, the former a native of Brattleboro, 
Vermont, born in 1815, and the latter of 
Genesee Valley, New York, born in 1818. 
Her uncles on both sides participated in the 
war of 1812. Dr. Philomen B. and Mary 
(Grimes) Pratt, were early settlers : of Du- 
Page county, and- he was one of the first 
dentists in Illinois, beginning practice in 
Chicago, in 1850. On the discovery of 
gold in California, he made a trip to the 
new Eldorado, but only remained one year, 
returning to engage in the practice of his 
profession, having previously studied under 
his brother, D. Amos Pratt. In early life 
he was politically a Whig, and later a 
stanch Republican. 

When our subject was but six years of 
age, the family moved to Batavia, Illinois. 
Young as he was he drove three head of 
cattle twelve miles, on foot. After living 
in Batavia, they moved to his present farm, 
where he since continued to reside, a period 
of forty-seven years. He came soon after 
a railroad was built to Elgin, and when 
wolves and foxes were yet seen in the vicin- 



394 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ity. His education was received in the com- 
mon schools of Batavia and Elgin, supple- 
mented by an attendance at Wheaton Col- 
lege, then under the presidency of the elder 
Blanchard. At the age of twenty-one he 
began the practice of dentistry with his 
father at Elgin, at which he continued 
eight years. 

Since discontinuing the practice of den- 
tistry, Dr. Pratt has given his entire atten- 
tion to stock raising. At first he raised 
only Jersey cattle, but soon changed to Hos- 
stein-Friesian and is now one of the largest 
individual breeders in America of that stock. 
He has been in the business since 1880, 
and has three farms stocked with registered 
cattle. The home farm consists of one 
hundred and fifty acres, partly lying in 
Cook county. He has one hundred and 
sixty acres near Gilbert and one hundred 
and thirty-five acres near Spaulding. The 
following are some of the noted strains that 
he has on hand in the spring of 1898: 
Pauline Paul, Nierop, Coronet, Duchess of 
York, Mathilda K., Ondine, Empress, 
Snowflake, Queen Bess, ZuiderZee, Astrea, 
Countess of Flanders, Maid of Twisk, Echo, 
Aaggie, Netherlands, Cliftons, Minks and 
Mercedes. 

Dr. Pratt has been twice married, his 
first union being with Miss Mattie Patrick, 
born in Bloomingdale, Illinois, and a daugh- 
ter of Hiram Patrick. After her death he 
married Katie Gibbons, daughter of John 
and Mary (Prendergast) Gibbons, by whom 
he has six children Walter, Matie, Alice, 
Ada, Alpha, and William A. The first two 
died in infancy. 

Dr. Pratt is a scientific and expert 
breeder and is an acknowledged authority 
on cattle. Cedarside farm, which adjoins 
the corporate limits of Elgin, is one of the 



best known farms in this section of the 
state. His dwelling house, which is of the 
Italian style of architecture, occupies an ex- 
ceedingly fine location, with fine groves sur- 
rounding the house and cedars lining the 
roadside. Soon after electric roads were 
built to Dundee, the Doctor laid out a fine 
park of thirty-five acres, which he gave the 
name of Trout Park, making of it a fine 
summer resort. All kinds of outdoor 
amusements are provided for its patrons in 
the summer and Trout Lake is well stocked 
with brook trout secured from Seth Green. 
Politically Dr. Pratt is aRepublican and fra- 
ternally a member of Lochiel lodge, No. 
105, K. of P., of Elgin. 



BRYANT DURANT.-- Years of quiet 
usefulness and a life in which the old- 
fashioned virtues of sincerity, industry and 
integrity are exemplified have a simple 
beauty that no words can portray. Youth 
has its charms, but an honorable and hon- 
ored old age, to which the lengthening years 
have added dignity and sweetness, has a 
brighter radiance, as if some ray from the 
life beyond already rested upon it. Mr. 
Durant, one of the oldest residents of St. 
Charles, is also one of the honored pioneers 
of Kane county, where he has made his 
home since May, 1837, and it is safe to say 
that no citizen of the community is held in 
higher esteem than he. 

In the town of Ware, Hampshire coun- 
ty, Massachusetts, Mr. Durant was born 
December 14, 1807, and is of the eighth 
generation of the family in this country. 
His ancestors were among the earliest set- 
tlers of the old Bay state, making their 
homes in Boston and Newton, and arrtong 
their number were several who participated 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



395 



in the Revolutionary war, aiding the col- 
onies in their struggle for independence. 
Our subject's grandfather, Denny Durant, 
was born in Newton, near Boston, of French 
extraction, and the father, John Durant, 
was a native of the same place. The latter 
engaged in merchandising in early life, but 
later turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits. He married Abigail Ward, also a 
native of Massachusetts, and a daughter of 
Elijah Ward, another representative of one 
of the first families of that state, and a 
Revolutionary soldier. In 1849 John Du- 
rant joined our subject in St. Charles, where 
he spent his last days, and now he and his 
wife, who survived him about two years, 
sleep side by side in the cemetery at that 
place. 

The subject of this sketch attended the 
public schools of his native state to a limited 
extent, but is principally self-educated and 
is a well-informed man. During his youth 
he learned the bricklayer's trade, at which 
he worked at Cambridge, Brighton and 
Newton for about sixteen years, and also 
engaged to some extent in farming in Mas- 
sachusetts. In 1837 he came to Illinois, by 
way of the lakes to Chicago, where his 
brother James engaged in merchandising for 
many years. He arrived in that city in 
March, and the following May came to Kane 
county, where, in company with his brother 
and another gentleman, he bought a claim 
of .one thousand acres, which he at once 
began to open up and improve. After fol- 
lowing agricultural pusuits for two years, he 
had the farm operated by others while he 
worked at his trade in St. Charles and in 
different sections throughout Kane county 
for some years, though he still continued to 
live upon the farm. When the property 
was divided he obtained two hundred acres, 



on which he erected a substantial brick res- 
idence, good barns and other outbuildings, 
and made many other valuable improve- 
ments. The place is pleasantly located only 
two miles from St. Charles. About 1881 he 
rented the farm and removed to St. Charles, 
where he has since lived retired, enjoying 
the rest he has so well earned and so richly 
deserves. 

At Genoa, DeKalb county, Illinois, Mr. 
Durant was married in 1842, to Miss Jerusha 
Shurtliff, who was born and reared in 
Lowell, Massachusetts Her father, David 
Shurtliff, was born in Plymouth, that state, 
and belonged to one of its earliest families. 
Mr. and Mrs. Durant have six children, 
namely: Julia is the wife of J. W. Johnston, 
of St. Charles; Henrietta is the widow of 
Frank Herrington and now resides in Ober- 
lin, Ohio; William H. is a business man of 
Chicago; Emma is the widow of Dr. Lane, 
who was a leading physician of St. Charles 
for some years, and she now resides with 
her parents, while she is successfully en- 
gaged in teaching in St. Charles, being a 
lady of superior education; Abbie is the 
wife of Henry Allen, of Iowa; and Charles 
is married and engaged in farming in 
Kansas. 

Since the election of General Jackson to 
the presidency, Mr. Durant has always been 
found at the polls on each election day, sup- 
porting first the candidates of the Whig 
party, and since the organization of the 
Republican party has been one of its earnest 
advocates, voting for John C. Fremont in 
1856. He attended the convention that 
nominated Abraham Lincoln for the presi- 
dency, and was always a warm admirer of 
the martyr president and his policy. Be- 
lieving that a protective tariff is best suited 
to the needs of the American people, he 



396 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



gives it his hearty support, and he is also a 
stanch supporter of the gold standard of 
currency. With the Congregational church 
he and his wife hold membership. Although 
their lives have been quiet and unassuming, 
they have made hosts of friends throughout 
Kane county, and by all who know them 
they are held in high regard. 



HORACE J. SEYMOUR, a well-known 
contractor and builder residing at No. 
40 Jefferson avenue, Elgin, is a native of 
Illinois, born in Cook county, February 10, 
1851, and is a representative of one of the 
oldest and most distinguished families of the 
United States, its members being well 
represented in the early wars of the coun- 
try. On the paternal side he traces his an- 
cestry back to ' Richard Seymour, who 
came to the New World about 1635, ar >d 
was the first mayor of Hartford, Connect- 
icut, his name appearing on the monument 
erected to the first settlers of that place, 
in Center church burying ground. His son 
Thomas was the father of Captain Matthew 
Seymour, whose son, Captain Thomas Sey- 
mour, took an active and prominent part in 
the French and Indian war. The son of 
the last named, Ebenezer Seymour, was 
born May 16, 1729, near Greenwich, Con- 
necticut, and married Ruth Scribner, who 
was born in 1730 and died in 1820. Their 
son Jesse, who was the great-grandfather 
of our subject, was a commissary in the 
war of the Revolution, and emptied his 
private purse to pay for food for the sol- 
diers. He married Mercy Fancher, of 
Dutchess county. New York, and to them 
were born fifteen children. 

John Seymour, our subject's grand- 
father, married Elizabeth Wright, who was 



born November, 1794, and was one of a 
family of six children, whose parents were 
Ephraim and Martha Wright, the former 
born February 6, 1766, the latter April 8, 
1770. Her grandparents were John and 
Elizabeth Wright, the former born Decem- 
ber 25. 1736, the latter May 2, 1746. John 
Wright was a son of John and Ruth Wright, 
the former born April 5, 1703, a son of 
Gideon and Margaret W. Wright. Gideon 
Wright was born in Germany, January 8, 
1675, and was the founder of the branch of 
the family in America. To John and Eliz- 
abeth (Wright) Seymour were born the 
following children: Samuel, Susan, Wright, 
and Ephraim, all deceased; Hannah, who 
is still living; Elizabeth and Frederick, 
both deceased; and Harvey, Joseph, John 
W.', Cordelia, deceased, and Deziah, all 
living. The mother of these children died 
September 28, 1816, aged sixty-six years, 
nine months and twenty-seven days, and 
the father passed away at the home of John 
Seymour, in Elgin, aged ninety-seven years, 
nine months and seven days. Both were 
laid to rest in the cemetery at Barrington, 
Cook county. 

Our subject's father, Joseph B. Sey- 
mour, was born near Dundee, Steuben 
county, New York, and on coming west in 
1844 located upon a partially improved 
farm in Barrington township, Cook county, 
where he engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until his removal to Aurora in 1867. There 
he still continues to reside at the age of 
seventy-four years.. He married Mary S. 
Haven, who was born in Carthage, Jeffer- 
son county, New York, November 28, 1832, 
a daughter of Samuel and Lydia (Strong) 
Haven. Her mother was born in Stafford, 
New Hampshire, August 22, 1799, and died 
November 22, 1874. Mrs. Seymour is one 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



397 



of a family of seven children, of whom only 
two are now living, the other being Martha 
Malvina, who was born in Carthage, New 
York, July 9, 1836. The parents of our 
subject are both earnest and consistent 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and are held in high regard by all who know 
them. 

Horace J. Seymour was reared upon the 
home farm in Cook county, and after the 
removal of the family to Aurora continued 
his education, taking a miscellaneous and 
business course. He is the only child 
of his parents. After his marriage he en- 
gaged in farming for three years in Cook 
county, and for the following four years was 
employed as clerk and driver by the Amer- 
ican Express Company at Aurora. He then 
engaged in fanning near Kankakee for three 
years, after which he lived in that city for 
two years, and in 1884 came to Elgin in 
time to vote for James G. Elaine for presi- 
dent. Having learned the carpenter's 
trade in early life, he has successfully en- 
gaged in contracting and building in Elgin, 
erecting residences principally. He has also 
been interested to some extent in the real- 
estate and mercantile business, and in his 
undertakings has met with a fair degree of 
success. 

On the 2Oth of March, 1872, Mr. Sey- 
mour was united in marriage with Miss R. 
Jennie Smith, a daughter of Reuben B. 
Smith, of Lament, Cook county. Her great- 
grandmother, a Mrs. Streator, of Washing- 
ton county, New York, lived to the extreme 
old age of one hundred six years. Her seven 
brothers all went as volunteers in the Con- 
tinental army during the Revolutionary war, 
while the sisters were left at home to carry 
on the farm. Mr. and Mrs. Seymour have 
two children: Hattie and Fred Wesley. 



The former is now the wife of H. T. Pix- 
ley, of Marion, Iowa, and has two children: 
Merle Seymour and Ira A. 

Our subject, his wife and children all 
hold membership in the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, and Mrs. Seymour is a teacher 
in the Sunday-school. She is a graduate 
of the Aurora high school, and for several 
years successfully engaged in teaching in 
that city. Mr. Seymour is a charter mem- 
ber of and active worker in the Modern 
Woodmen Society of Elgin, of which he was 
treasurer for several years after its organi- 
zation, and is at present a member of the 
sick committee, which during the past year 
dispensed about two thousand dollars for 
the relief of the sick. Politically he is an 
ardent Republican, and has rilled the office 
of assistant supervisor, but cares nothing for 
political honors. As a business man and 
citizen he enjoys the esteem of the entire 
community. 



T ESTER M. BURROUGHS, M. D., is 
I/ one of the oldest and most successful 
practitioners in Kane county, and has been 
a resident of Batavia since 1861. He is a 
native of Ohio, born in Shalersville, Portage 
county, September 25, 1820. His father, 
Daniel Burroughs, Jr., was born in New 
Hampshire, but reared in Williamstown, 
Vermont, while his grandfather, Daniel Bur- 
roughs, Sr., was a native of Connecticut, 
born in May, 1755, and was a faithful soldier 
in the Revolutionary army. The family 
are of English descent. 

In 1810 Daniel Burroughs, Sr., accom- 
panied by his father's family, located in 
Portage county, Ohio, and were among the 
earliest settlers of that locality. In that 
county Daniel Burroughs, Jr., married Miss 



398 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Abigail Hine, a native of Connecticut, whose 
father, Daniel Hine, was also a native of 
that state. He located in Trumbull county, 
Ohio, in 1808. By trade Daniel Burroughs, 
Jr., was a brick and stone mason, but in 
later life followed fanning. He was a sol- 
dier in the war of 1812, and at Detroit was 
among the number surrendered to the en- 
emy by General Hull, but was soon after 
paroled. In 1836 he moved to Illinois and 
located in Kendall county, where he en- 
gaged in farming. His last years, however, 
were spent at Batavia, and his death oc- 
curred at the residence of his son in 1866. 
His wife passed away in Kendall county in 
1863. 

The subject of this sketch came to Illi- 
nois with his parents at the age of sixteen 
years. His literary education commenced 
in the common schools of Ohio, and com- 
pleted in the public schools of Illinois. In 
early life he conceived the idea that he 
would make the medical profession his life 
work. Purchasing some books he com- 
menced reading, and later entered the office 
of Dr. Gardiner, of Blackberry, Illinois, and 
under his instruction continued his studies. 
He then took a special course of lectures in 
the medical college at Cleveland, Ohio, and 
later spent one year in the medical college 
at Kenosha, Wisconsin. After some three 
or four years' study he commenced the prac- 
tice of medicine. Soon after he commenced 
practice, he was called to attend a small- 
pox patient, and before his patient recov- 
ered he was called to treat sixty-nine other 
cases. 

While residing in Blackberry, Dr. Bur- 
roughs was united in marriage, November 
24, 1849, with Miss Almira Wheeler, a na- 
tive of Troy, New York, who came with her 
parents to Kane county, Illinois, in 1838. 



Her father, David Wheeler, was a promi- 
nent man in Troy, and there served as post- 
master eight years under General Jackson. 
After his removal to Blackberry he served 
in like capacity for ten years. In the war 
of 1812 he was taken prisoner by the Brit- 
ish, and held at Barbados for some time. 
He married Judith Pearson, of Newberry- 
port, Massachusetts, in 1815. He reared a 
family of eight sons and one daughter. In 
Kane county he was quite a prominent man 
until his death. 

In 1 86 1, Dr. Burroughs located at Bata- 
via, where he has since continued in active 
practice, although nearing his four score. In 
the early days he was an Abolitionist, and 
was one of the conductors on the under- 
ground railroad, assisting fugitives who were 
fleeing to a free land. His first presidential 
ballot was cast for James G. Birney. Believ- 
ing that the desires of his heart might the 
sooner be gained, on the organization of the 
Republican party, he identified himself with 
it and has voted for each of its presidential 
candidates from Fremont to McKinley. 
While always taking an active interest in 
political affairs, his professional duties have 
prevented his holding official position. 

To the Doctor and Mrs. Burroughs, two 
daughters were born. Mary B. is now the 
wife of William K. Coffin, a banker of Wis- 
consin, and president of the Bankers' Asso- 
ciation of that state, and Nellie May, who yet 
resides at home. Fraternally Dr. Burroughs 
is a Master Mason and is also a member of 
the Odd Fellows. In the subordinate lodge 
of that order he has passed all the chairs, 
and in the encampment he has likewise 
filled all the offices. For sixty-two years 
he has been a resident of the state of Illi- 
nois, the greater part of which time he has 
been engaged in his professional duties, and 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



399 



the good that he has done in the alleviation 
of human suffering can never be known. 
Few men have more friends throughout 
Northern Illinois than has the subject of 
this sketch. 



WILLIAM KLICK, section 10, Hamp- 
shire township, is descended from an 
old German family, whose ancestors came 
to America prior to the Revolutionary war. 
His grandfather,, Conrad Klick, was prob- 
ably born in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, 
the family being well known pioneers of that 
section, the great-great-grandfather there 
being killed by the Indians. Conrad Klick, 
who was a farmer by occupation, married 
Elizabeth Weidmeyer, also of an old colonial 
family. His death occurred when he was 
about sixty-five years old. 

John Klick, the son of Conrad and 
Elizabeth Klick, was born in Lebanon 
county, Pennsylvania, in December, 1806, 
and was reared in his native county. When 
a young man he worked in a mill, but fol- 
lowed the occupation of a farmer the greater 
part of his life. In 1847, he came west, 
driving through from Pennsylvania to Kane 
county, Illinois, with horse teams, and was 
five weeks on the way. He settled in sec- 
tion ii, Hampshire township, where he 
purchased one hundred and twenty acres of 
timber land, a very small part of which had 
been cleared. He went to work and cleared 
most of the land and there resided until his 
death. He was a thrifty man and a good 
farmer and was fairly successful in life. 
Before leaving his Pennsylvania home he 
married Katherine Decker, a native of Berks 
county, Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Jacob 
was Elizabeth (Brandt) Decker. Her father 
was a carpenter by trade, and died when she 



was quite young. Her paternal grandfather 
was in the Revolutionary war, and was 
markedby a bullet wound on the forehead, the 
scar of which remained until his death. To 
John and Katherine Klick ten children 
were born, of whom nine are living, as fol- 
lows: William, our subject; Elizabeth, who 
married Moses Reams, and lives on section 
ii, Hampshire township; Anna, who mar- 
ried Ephraim Reams and lives in Iowa; 
Susanna, wife of Rev. Henry Shoemaker, 
of Elgin; John Henry, a resident of the vil- 
lage of Hampshire; Jonathan, engaged in 
farming in Iowa; Mrs. Lucetta Gift, of 
Hampshire township; Catherine, widow of 
Christian Schiller; and Henry, residing 
in Iowa. Amanda died in young woman- 
hood. 

William Klick was born in Bethel town- 
ship, Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, No- 
vember 17, 1829. He attended the common 
schools of his native county until thirteen 
years of age, and worked on a farm until he 
came west in 1847. Here he remained un- 
der his father's roof and assisted in the 
cultivation of the farm until his marriage, 
when he rented the farm and began life for 
himself. Some four or five years later he 
purchased twenty acres, which he worked 
in connection with his father's farm, and 
subsequently bought eighty acres of prairie 
land, lying three miles west. The two 
places being so far apart made it incon- 
venient to work them, so he sold both in 
1865, and September 13, of that year,, 
bought his present farm of seventy-five 
acres, in sections 10 and 15, on which was 
a log house and barn. He improved the 
house, covering the outside with siding and 
lathing and plastering the inside, making it 
a comfortable house, in which he resided 
with his family for some years. Later he 



400 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



built a neat frame house, good, commodious 
barns and other outbuildings, and placed 
the farm under a good state of cultivation. 
He planted an orchard, which for years 
bore a large amount of fruit. In addition 
to general farming, he is engaged in dairy- 
ing in a small way, selling milk to the fac- 
tory in Hampshire. From his dooryard, a 
fine view is obtained across the country 
west, the village of Genoa being distinctly 



seen. 



Mr. Klick was married in Hampshire 
township, June i, 1850, to Caroline Reams, 
born in Union county, Pennsylvania, and a 
daughter of Samuel and Salome (Aurand) 
Reams, the latter being a daughter of John 
and Catherine (Young) Aurand. The 
mother of Samuel Reams attained the age 
of eighty-eight years, and her brothers, Pe- 
ter and Henry, lived to be eighty-eight and 
eighty-sixyears respectively. Both served in 
the Revolutionary war. Samuel Reams 
left Union county, Pennsylvania, in 1834, 
and moving to Ohio, there resided eleven 
years. In 1845 he came to Kane county, 
Illinois, coming through with ox teams and 
bringing also four cows; he was four weeks 
on the road, camping each night by the 
wayside. He arrived in Kane county in 
July, bought a farm in Hampshire township, 
and there resided until his death at the age 
of seventy-three years. 

To our subject and wife six children 
were born, of whom Ira and Nathan are de- 
ceased, the living are: (i) William Frank- 
lin, who married Lydia Marshall, by whom 
he has three children, Carrie, Lydia and 
Daniel. They lived in Elgin a number of 
years, but in 1894 went to Chicago: (2) 
Aaron, who married Ellen Williams, by 
whom he has eight children, Alonzo, Emma, 
Samuel, Rosa, William, Wilbur, Clarence 



and Malinda; of these, Emma is now de- 
ceased. (3) Elias.who makes his home with 
his parents, is an expert carpenter and cab- 
inet maker, very ingenious, manufacturing 
various sweet-toned musical instruments. 
(4) Samuel, who is employed on neighbor- 
ing farms, makes his home with his parents. 
Politically Mr. Klick is a Republican 
and has been honored with several town- 
ship offices including school director, road 
commissioner and constable. In the first 
named office he served for. thirteen years. 
Our subject well remembers pioneer days 
in Kane county. There were yet wolves 
and deer here when the family came and he 
remembers on one occasion that his dog 
bringing a deer at bay, and endeavoring to 
shoot it his gun failed to discharge. Some 
hunters who were chasing it soon came up 
and pursued it to its death. 



NATHANAEL J. THOMAS, city elec- 
trician of Aurora, was born in Greene 
county, Ohio, April 7, 1838, and is the son 
of Henry and Susannah (Bayliff) Thomas. 
The father was a native of Virginia, born 
March 14, 1803, and was the son of Jacob 
Thomas. By occupation Henry Thomas 
was a farmer, and he removed to Ohio with 
his parents, when a small boy, and where 
he resided for many years. He came to Ill- 
inois, locating in Bureau county. In 1862, 
he removed to Iowa, locating in Pocahontas 
county, where he purchased a farm, and car- 
ried on farming until his death, October 25, 
1 88 1. In religion he was a Methodist, and 
politically was originally a Henry Clay Whig, 
and later a Republican. His wife, Susannah 
Bayliff, was born February 15, 1808, and 
died February 20, 1883. She was a con- 
sistent member of the Methodist Episcopal 




NATHANAEL J. THOMAS. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



403 



church. They were the parents of eleven 
children, nine of whom grew to mature 
years. They were Daniel, now living in 
Washington; Jacob, deceased; Lydia, who 
married Jeremiah Young, and is living in 
Washington; Joshua, deceased; Benjamin, 
who died in infancy; Joel B., of Oklahoma; 
Nathaniel J., our subject; William A., who 
died in the army, was a member of Com- 
pany B, Ninety-third Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry; Ellen, who married Barney Hanshire, 
living in Iowa; Henry H., who died in 
infancy, and Sally A., who married George 
Strong, and after his death, married Mr. Brice 
and is in living in Washington. 

Our subject was in his twelfth year, 
when his parents left Ohio and came to Ill- 
inois. He was reared on the home farm, 
where he assisted his father, and attended 
the country schools as the opportunity was 
afforded him. On the I2th of August, 
1862, at Dover, Illinois, he enlisted in Com- 
pany B, Ninety-third Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, and went into camp in Chicago, on 
duty at Camp Douglas, guarding Shiloh 
prisoners. The regiment remained there until 
Novemberber gth, and was then ordered to 
Memphis, Tennessee, and was with Grant on 
the Holly Springs expedition. Returning to 
Memphis they remained until they went out 
against Vicksburg. The regiment was in 
the Third Brigade, under command of Gen- 
eral McPherson, which formed a part of the 
Seventh Division, of the Seventeenth Army 
Corps. Mr. Thomas took part in all that 
siege, until the surrender. He was next on 
the expedition against Johnston, on the Big 
Black river, after which he was transferred 
to the Veteran Reserve Corps, February 14, 
1864. He was then sent to Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, where they had a recruiting 
camp, and was there until ordered to Little 

19 



York, Pennsylvania, where he remained two 
months. From Little York they went to 
Scranton, Pennsylvania, and was there seven 
months, then to Philadelphia, and Chester, 
Pennsylvania, where he remained until mus- 
tered out, July 8, 1865. He came out of 
the service without a scratch. 

After being mustered out, Mr. Thomas 
returned to Bureau county, and February 
i, 1866, went to Mendota, and there en- 
tered the telegraph service of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy railroad company until 
December, 1886. Early in 1887. he re- 
signed from the service of the company, and 
entered the service of the city of Aurora, in 
charge of its electric lights. 

Mr. Thomas was married August 12, 
1862, to Miss Mary E. Barr, a native of 
Coshocton, Ohio, and daughter of Hezekiah 
and Hannah Barr. By this union was one 
child, which died in infancy. Mrs. Thomas 
died July 18, 1871, and Mr. Thomas mar- 
ried his second wife, Adaline Warner, Oc- 
tober 1 1, 1874. She was a native of Proph- 
etstown, Illinois, where her parents now 
live. She died December 23, 1876. The 
third marriage was to Miss Libbie M. Evans, 
who was born in Aurora, and was a daugh- 
ter of Griffith and Elizabeth (Welden) 
Evans, both of whom are natives of Penn- 
sylvania. She died February 27, 1897. 

In politics, Mr. Thomas is a Republican, 
and a stalwart member of the party. He is 
a charter member of Charlemagne lodge, 
No. 245, K. P., and of the Mendota lodge, 
No. 293, I. O. O. F. He is also a member 
of the Aurora post, No. 20, G. A. R., of 
which he is past commander, and has 
served as delegate to the state encampments, 
also a member of Greusel Garrison, No. 
143, Knights of the Globe. For his serv- 
ices during the late war, he is now receiving 



404 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a pension. In political matters he has 
always taken an active part, and is regarded 
very highly as a citizen, and as an official. 
In him the city has a faithful and a capa- 
ble officer in charge of their electric system, 
and one in whom they can rely as always 
being ready, and at his post of duty. 



EBENEZER .DENNEY, one of the old 
and much respected citizens of Aurora, 
and president of the board of public works, 
was born in Yorkshire, England, August 15, 
1840, and is the son of Joseph and Jane 
(Spur) Denney. His father came to the 
United States in 1855, located in Aurora; 
he was a cabinet maker and followed his 
trade in this country for a time, and then 
retired from active business. His death oc- 
curred in 1878, at Aurora. Politically he 
was a Republican, and religiously a mem- 
ber of the First Congregational church. He 
was a man of medium size, solid built, of 
strong character, but generous with all. His 
wife, Jane Denney, was a native of Not- 
tinghamshire, England, and was also a mem- 
ber of the Congregational church. She 
died in 1861. They were the parents of 
seven children, and those living are Thomas, 
residing in Aurora; Joseph, Hallifield and 
our subject, all residing in Aurora. 

Ebenezer Denney, our subject, attended 
the schools of Yorkshire, and worked with 
his father at the cabinet maker's trade. In 
1850, his brothers, William and Joseph, 
came to the United States and engaged in 
cabinet making at Aurora. On their recom- 
mendation, the remainder of the family 
came also to this country, and our subject 
went into the business with his brothers. 
William died in 1861. Our subject enlisted 
to serve his adopted country, and was mus- 



tered into the service on his birthday, in 
1862, at Chicago, as a member of Com- 
pany G, Seventy-second Regiment Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry. From Chicago they 
went to Cairo, and from there to Padu- 
cah, Kentucky, thence to Columbus, at 
which place the regiment joined Grant's 
army, and took part in the siege and reduc- 
tion of Vicksburg. He was with the force 
of sappers and miners, whose duty was 
night work in the mines and fortifications. 
His regiment was one of the first to march 
into Vicksburg, after the surrender. 

Mr. Denney was detached from the Sev- 
enty-second Regiment and made quarter- 
master sergeant of the Fiftieth Regiment, 
United States Colored Troops. He was 
with that regiment for a few months, when 
he received a commission as second lieuten- 
ant of Company E, of that regiment. After 
remaining at Vicksburg for some time, he 
went with the regiment on the Mobile expe- 
dition, and was in the great attack on Fort 
Blakeley. They then returned up the Mis- 
sissippi and was stationed at Jackson, Mis- 
sissippi, when he was finally mustered out. 
In 1864, he was promoted to first lieuten- 
ant, after which he was on staff duty, on 
the staff of General M. F. Force, who was 
a great friend of his. While at Jackson, a 
singular thing occurred, Lieutenant Den- 
ney for one day being in command of the 
department, General Force having turned 
the command over to him when he was 
mustered out. 

After his being mustered out Lieutenant 
Denney was sent to Vicksburg, where he 
was paid off and discharged. He then re- 
turned to Aurora, and took up his business 
again. In 1882, he formed a partnership 
with his brothers, Joseph, Thomas and Hal- 
lifield, the firm being known as the Denney 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



405 



Brothers. In March, 1894, Albert Denney, 
son of Joseph Denney, and our subject, pur- 
chased the interest of the other members 
of the firm, and the firm name is now Den- 
ney & Denney. They carry a general stock 
of furniture, and undertaking supplies, and 
their large warerooms are full of all kinds 
of goods in the line of their trade. They 
do their own upholstering, and manufacture 
mattresses, etc. 

Lieutenant Denney was married Sep- 
tember 10, 1861, to Mary Elliott, daughter 
of W. T. and Rebecca (Pierce) Elliott, who 
were numbered among the early settlers of 
Kane county, and who were natives of New 
York. The mother is still living on the old 
homestead in Aurora township, the farm 
being the one purchased frprn the general 
government. Mrs. Denney was born on 
that farm. Her death occurred in 1862, 
ten months after her wedding day. On the 
7th of November, 1865, Lieutenant Denney 
was again married, his second union being 
with Miss Mary Mix, at Raymond, Missis- 
sippi. Thus something was done toward 
bringing the two factions together. Not 
having any children of their own, they 
adopted George Burton Denney, when the 
child was but two years old. He is now 
twenty-two years old and is associatedwith his 
father in the business. In the public schools 
of Aurora, he was liberally educated, and 
was then sent to the conservatory of music, 
at Chicago, to perfect his musical educa- 
tion. He has fine musical talent, and plays 
several instruments. He is a member of 
the Aurora cornet band, and gives instruc- 
tions on the clarionet, piano and guitar. 

Mr. and Mrs. Denney are members of 
the Congregational church of Aurora, and 
in politics he is a Republican. He has 
served in the city council two terms, and 



has been on the hospital board, the library 
board and is now on the board of the Old 
Ladies' Home. For a number of years he 
was secretary of the Building and Loan As- 
sociation, and is now its president. In 1897, 
he was appointed by Mayor Holden, pres- 
ident of the board of public works, the du- 
ties of which office he fills in the most sat- 
isfactory manner. While a member of the 
city council, he was chairman of the com- 
mittee on public lights, and the present 
splendid electric light plant, which is now 
owned by the city, and its fine system, dates 
back to the time when Mr. Denney took 
hold of the subject and to the city's owner- 
ship. He is a member of the Masonic or- 
der, Jerusalem Temple and of the chapter. 
He is also a member of the Odd Fellows, 
the United Workmen, Knights of the Globe 
and Aurora post No. 20, G. A. R. , of which 
he past commander, and by reason of his 
position, has been delegate to the state and 
national encampments. 



JOHN ADAM SCHOEBERLEIN, the 
efficient chief of the fire department of- 
Aurora, is a native of the city, born March 
3, i86i| and is the son of John A. and Bar- 
bara (Pfeifer) Schoeberlein, both of whom 
were born in Bavaria, but were married in 
this country. The father was born in 1813, 
and came to the United States in 1854, lo- 
cating in Aurora, where he followed his 
trade of blacksmithing until 1873, when he 
engaged in the coal business, which he con- 
ducted for sixteen years. His death oc- 
curred at Aurora, January 27, 1892. He 
was a member of the German Methodist 
church, and was the founder of that denomi- 
nation in Aurora, and continued one of its 
main pillars until his death. Politically he 



406 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was a Republican, and a strong advocate of 
the principles of that party. His father, 
also named John Adam, was by occupation 
a farmer, and lived and died in Bavaria. 
His wife is still living in Aurora, and is a 
worthy member of the church founded by 
her husband. They were the parents of 
eight children, of whom three grew to ma- 
turity Fred, who was at one time an alder- 
man in the city of Aurora, and the youngest 
person ever holding that position in the 
city council, died April 17, 1888; Sabilla, 
died at the age of fifteen years. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in 
Aurora, and received his education in the 
public schools. He was but sixteen years 
of age when he commenced the grocery 
business at the corner of New York and 
Union streets, which business he carried on 
for twelve years, when he sold out. He 
was in partnership with his brother. In 
June, 1892, he was appointed by W. S. 
Frazier, then mayor of the city, chief of 
the fire department, serving for two years, 
when a change of government took place. 
In June, 1897, he was again appointed to 
the position by Mayor Holden, and is still 
holding that place. His administration has 
been satisfactory and he is making a good 
officer, as is demonstrated by the efficiency 
of the fire department. 

Mr. Schoeberlein was married March 
15, 1883, to Miss Mary Peetz, a native of 
Aurora, and a daughter of Jacob and Mary 
Peetz. By this union are three children 
Ella May, Earl and Mate. Religiously Mr. 
and Mrs. Schoeberlein are members of the 
German Methodist church. In politics he 
is a Republican, and fraternally is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias. 

John A. Schoeberlein, the father, erected 
the Schoeberlein block, a three-story brick 



structure, on Fox street, which he gave to 
our subject before his death. Chief Schoe- 
berlein has a good substantial home which 
he erected for himself and family on the 
corner of State and New York streets, and 
where he resides, respected by all who 
know him. 



JOHN ALLEN, deceased, was for some 
years one of the leading farmers in 
Hampshire township, residing on section 23. 
He was born at Louisville, St. Lawrence 
county, New York, September 10, 1809, 
and was the son of Elijah and Susan 
(Edson) Allen, both of whom were natives 
of Vermont. The former died at about the 
age of eighty-two years in Beaver, Craw- 
ford county, Pennsylvania. The latter 
died at about the age of eighty years. 
Elijah was the son of Aaron, who served 
through seven years'of the Revolution, while 
he served in the war of 1812. 

In 1829 our subject moved to Burton 
county, Ohio, and in 1833 moved to Craw- 
ford county, Pennsylvania. While residing 
in the latter county he married Jane De 
Wolf September 26, 1852, born in the 
town of Corinth, Saratoga county, New 
York, January 26, 1826, and who removed 
with her parents to Crawford county, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1838. She is the daughter of 
Charles and Betsy (Putnam) DeWolf, both 
natives of Chester county, Vermont. Her 
grandfather, Edward DeWolf, was a soldier 
in the Revolutionary war, while her father 
served in the war oi 1812. By this union 
were five children Edna Jane and Edwin 
John, twins, the latter being deceased; 
Charles C., deceased; Adelbert and John E. 
Politically Mr. Allen was originally a Whig, 
and later a Republican. Religiously he was 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



407 



a member of the Wesleyan Methodist 
Church. 

In 1865 Mr. Allen moved west, with a 
view of bettering his condition in life. He 
arrived in Kane county, Illinois, April 14, 
of that year, and bought one hundred and 
thirty acres of land on section 23, Hamp- 
shire township, known as the old Doty 
farm. In 1883 he bought eighty acres ad- 
joining on the east, on which was a fine 
large house and large barns. In this house 
the family has resided for some years, the 
old house having burned. After a long and 
useful life Mr. Allen was called to his re- 
ward May 28, 1895. His residence of 
thirty years in Kane county had brought 
him somewhat prominently before the peo- 
ple, and he was well known in Kane and 
McHenry counties. 

Adelbert Allen, son of John and Jane 
Allen, grew to manhood on the home farm, 
and married Minnie Howe, November 14, 
1894, who was fourth in a family of eight 
children born to William J. and Johanna 
(Benke) Howe. Her father, was born in 
the village of Baenkenhaven, province of 
Pomerania, Prussia, April i, 1842, and her 
mother born April 11, 1842, was reared in 
Germany, and came to America in 1868, 
embarking October 15, at Hamburg, on a 
sailing vessel. The voyage was a stormy 
one and required eleven weeks and four 
days. They landed at New York, Decem- 
ber 2t, a memorable Christmas day and 
came direct to Dundee, Kane 'county, Illi- 
nois, where Mr. Howe secured work until 
spring. He first worked for Dr. Crabtree 
and later farm work near Harmony, in Mc- 
Henry county. After working as a farm 
hand for seven years, he rented a farm 
near Harmony for one year, then rented 
in Hampshire township two years and again 



one year more in McHenry county, and 
for five years on the farm of William 
Willetts, in Hampshire township, and later 
two years in Rutland township. He bought 
his present farm of eighty acres in Decem- 
ber, 1883, to which he moved January I, 
1884. William J. Howe was a son of 
Christian Howe, born in Pomerania, about 
1810, and then died about 1854, when Will- 
iam was a boy. The grandfather, John 
Howe, was a farmer in Germany, where his 
entire life was spent. Christian Howe mar- 
ried Mary Miller, now living in McHenry 
county, at the age of eighty-three years. 
Her father was a shepherd in the old coun- 
try. William J. Howe married Johanna 
Benke, in the village of Giescehn, Pomer- 
ania, December 10, 1867. She is a daugh- 
ter of Joseph Benke, a farmer who lived and 
died in the old country. To Adelbert Allen 
and wife one child has been born, Walter 
Raymond, born September 28, 1895. 



JOSEPH SANFORD FERRY, of Au- 
J rora, Illinois, has spent sixty years of 
his life in the Prairie state, almost within 
hailing distance of Aurora. He is a native of 
Washington county, New York, born Octo- 
ber 1 8, 1829. His father, Sylvanus Ferry, 
was a native of Massachusetts, born in 1800, 
and there grew to manhood, moving from 
thence to Washington county, New York, 
in company with his brother, Homer Ferry. 
He married, in Washington county, Miss 
Rhoda Wilson, a native of that county and 
state, and a daughter of James Wilson, also 
born in the same county. By trade Sylva- 
nus Ferry was a tanner and currier, and 
followed that occupation during his entire 
life. In 1836 he moved to Terre Haute, 
Indiana, where he remained about one and 



408 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a half years. In 1838 he moved west to 
Du Page county, Illinois, locating in Naper- 
ville township, where he purchased a claim 
and where his death occurred two years 
later. His wife survived him many years, 
and passed away at the advanced age of 
eighty-seven years. Our subject was the 
youngest and only survivor of their three 
children. His brother, Melancthon Ferry, 
grew to manhood, married and farmed for 
some years, later removed to Aurora, where 
he lived retired, and where his death oc- 
curred. The sister, Louisa, died a single 
lady. 

Our subject was but nine years of age 
when he came west with his parents to Du 
Page county, and on the home farm grew 
to manhood, and, as the opportunity was 
afforded him, attended the district school a 
few weeks in the winter months. He mar- 
ried in Du Page county, November 25, 
1855, Miss Sophronia Keny